627 episodes

Decoder is a show from The Verge about big ideas — and other problems. Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks to a diverse cast of innovators and policymakers at the frontiers of business and technology to reveal how they’re navigating an ever-changing landscape, what keeps them up at night, and what it all means for our shared future.

Decoder with Nilay Patel The Verge

    • Business
    • 4.1 • 2.7K Ratings

Decoder is a show from The Verge about big ideas — and other problems. Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks to a diverse cast of innovators and policymakers at the frontiers of business and technology to reveal how they’re navigating an ever-changing landscape, what keeps them up at night, and what it all means for our shared future.

    The videos that don’t work on YouTube and the future of the creator business, with Nebula CEO Dave Wiskus

    The videos that don’t work on YouTube and the future of the creator business, with Nebula CEO Dave Wiskus

    One of our recurring jokes at The Verge is that every YouTuber eventually makes a video where they talk about how mad they are at YouTube. Whether it’s demonetization or copyright strikes or just the algorithm changing, YouTubers have to contend with a big platform that has a lot of power over their business, and they often don’t have the leverage to push back. 
    On this episode of Decoder, I’m talking to Dave Wiskus, the CEO of two really interesting companies: one is called Standard, which is a management company for YouTubers, and the other is Nebula, an alternative paid streaming platform where creators can post videos, take a direct cut of the revenue, and generally fund work that might get lost on YouTube. 
    What really stood out to me here is that Dave is in the business of making things: this conversation was really grounded in the reality of the creator business as it exists today and how that real business can support real people. You’ll hear it when we talk about Web3 and NFTs a little bit — Dave just thinks that stuff is b******t, and he says so because it’s not a business that exists now. That’s an important dynamic to think about — and one for more platforms to take seriously.

    Links:
    Dave's subscriber tweet
    Nebula

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22840704

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 15 min
    Vergecast: Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Google I/O 2022

    Vergecast: Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Google I/O 2022

    Google I/O was this week and Nilay Patel and David Pierce had a chance to sit down with Google CEO Sundar Pichai to talk about the event and the products that were announced. This interview was recorded for The Vergecast, another podcast from The Verge. You can listen to The Vergecast wherever you get your podcasts – or just click here.

    We hope you enjoyed the interview. Decoder will be back again on Tuesday with an all new episode. See you then.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 32 min
    UiPath CEO Daniel Dines thinks automation can fight the great resignation

    UiPath CEO Daniel Dines thinks automation can fight the great resignation

    Today Nilay Patel talking to Daniel Dines, the founder and CEO of UiPath, one of the biggest automation companies in the world. But not the automation you might think; UiPath sells software automation, or what consultants call “robotic process automation” so they can sound fancy and charge higher fees. UiPath and other software automation companies have a different approach to solving issues with your legacy software: just hire another computer to use software for you. Seriously: UiPath uses computer vision to literally look at what’s on a screen, and then uses a virtual mouse and keyboard to click around and do things in apps like Excel and Salesforce. The automations can be mundane, like generating lists of people to contact from public records, or intensely complicated: UiPath can actually monitor how different software is used throughout a company and suggest automations. Huge companies like Uber, Facebook, Spotify, and Google all use UIPath.

    Links:
    The robots are coming for your office
    UiPath AI Computer Vision

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22828061

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 10 min
    How big companies kill ideas — and how to fight back, with Tony Fadell

    How big companies kill ideas — and how to fight back, with Tony Fadell

    Tony Fadell was instrumental in the development of the iPod and iPhone at Apple and then co-founded Nest Labs, which kicked off the consumer smart home market with its smart thermostat in 2011. Tony sold Nest to Google for $3.2 billion in 2014 and eventually left Google. He now runs an investment company called Future Shape. 

    Links:
    Inside the Nest: iPod creator Tony Fadell wants to reinvent the thermostat
    General Magic - Trailer
    Inside Facebook’s metaverse for work
    Silicon Graphics
    Google is reorganizing and Sundar Pichai will become new CEO
    Fire drill: can Tony Fadell and Nest build a better smoke detector?
    Google purchases Nest for $3.2 billion
    Twitter accepts buyout, giving Elon Musk total control of the company
    Nest is rejoining Google to better compete with Amazon and Apple
    Apple Music Event 2005 - Motorola Rokr E1 / iTunes Phone
    Activision Blizzard hit with another sexual harassment lawsuit
    Nest buying video-monitoring startup Dropcam for $555 million
    What matters about Matter, the new smart home standard
    ZIGBEE ON MARS!

    Directory:
    Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple
    Andy Grove, former CEO of Intel
    Pat Gelsinger, current CEO of Intel
    Sundar Pichai, current CEO of Alphabet
    Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, SpaceX, and The Boring Company
    Jeff Williams, COO of Apple
    Matt Rogers, Nest co-founder
    Jeff Robbin, VP of consumer applications at Apple
    Steve Hoteling, former CEO gesture recognition company Finger Works
    Jon Rubinstein, senior VP of the iPod division at Apple
    Steve Sakomen, hardware engineer and executive at Apple 
    Avie Tavanian, chief software technology officer at Apple
    Scott Forstall, senior VP of iOS software, Apple
    Jony Ive, chief design officer, Apple

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22817673

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 17 min
    The executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation on government surveillance, Elon Musk, and free speech

    The executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation on government surveillance, Elon Musk, and free speech

    Cindy Cohn is the executive Director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, or EFF. If you’re an internet user of a certain age like me, you know the EFF as the premiere civil liberties group for the internet. The EFF has fought pitched battles against things like government surveillance, digital rights management for music and movies, and government speech regulations that would violate the First Amendment. These fights were important, and shaped the internet as we know it today.

    Links
    Electronic Frontier Foundation
    How to fix the Internet: Podcast by the EFF
    How the EU is fighting tech giants with Margrethe Vestager
    Apple pushes back on iPhone order, says FBI is seeking ‘dangerous power'
    Here’s why Apple’s new child safety features are so controversial
    Viacom vs YouTube
    Texas passes law that bans kicking people off social media based on ‘viewpoint’
    Santa Clara Principles
    Carterfone
    Decoder interview with YouTube chief product officer Neal Mohan
    Computer Fraud and Abuse Act
    Facebook v. Power Ventures

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22805290

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 52 min
    A former Foxconn executive tries to explain what went wrong in Wisconsin

    A former Foxconn executive tries to explain what went wrong in Wisconsin

    Alan Yeung is a professor of entrepreneurship at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the former head of the Foxconn project in Wisconsin. If you don’t quite remember, the Foxconn project in Wisconsin was announced in 2017 as a massive deal to build the first “Generation 10.5” LCD factory in North America. It was also one of the first big moments in the Trump presidency, complete with President Trump holding a golden shovel at a lavish groundbreaking ceremony where he said the factory would be “the eighth wonder of the world.”
    But it turned out that while Foxconn was putting on a great show, no LCD factory was actually getting built, even though Foxconn kept saying it was happening.

    Links
    We're nominated for a Webby! Vote for Decoder!
    The award winning story from Josh Dzieza - The 8th wonder of the world

    Wisconsin's $4.1 billion Foxconn factory boondoggle
    Foxconn’s $100M deal with the University of Wisconsin has students worried
    What a new governor means for Wisconsin’s controversial Foxconn factory
    Foxconn and the village: the $10B factory deal that turned one small Wisconsin town upside down
    No one seems to know what Foxconn is doing in Wisconsin
    After a ‘personal conversation’ with Trump, Foxconn says it will build a factory in Wisconsin after all
    Foxconn is confusing the hell out of Wisconsin
    Foxconn promised a ‘correction’ about empty buildings in Wisconsin two weeks ago, and it hasn’t said a word since
    With Foxconn chief’s Trump meeting, the Wisconsin project gets even more political
    One month ago, Foxconn said its innovation centers weren’t empty — they still are
    Foxconn’s delays might finally give Wisconsin the upper hand
    One year after Trump’s Foxconn groundbreaking, there is almost nothing to show for it
    Even fixing Wisconsin’s Foxconn deal won’t fix it, says state-requested report
    Foxconn’s first announced product for its Wisconsin factory is an airport coffee robot
    Foxconn releases and immediately cancels plans for a giant dome in Wisconsin
    Foxconn's giant glass dome in Wisconsin is back, baby
    Exclusive: documents show Foxconn refuses to renegotiate Wisconsin deal
    Foxconn’s buildings in Wisconsin are still empty, one year later
    Exclusive: Wisconsin denies Foxconn tax subsidies after contract negotiations fail
    The 8th wonder of the world
    Exclusive: Wisconsin report confirms Foxconn's “LCD factory” isn't real
    Foxconn tells Wisconsin it never promised to build an LCD factory
    Intel selects Ohio for ‘largest silicon manufacturing location on the planet’

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22794506

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 9 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
2.7K Ratings

2.7K Ratings

Andelpink ,

Great Podcast but…

Nilay is a great host, he does a superb job interviewing people. Decoder has some of of the most interesting people in the tech and business worlds on regularly. Im excited to see who they have an each week. Having said that, it’s evident that this show is heavily influenced by liberal ideology. I question if Nilay truly believes in some of the principles he advocates for on the show. I have a feeling that the people writing his checks are influencing that aspect of the show. That’s why I only give it four stars.

SWUtah ,

One of my favorites

Excellent interviewer and interesting subjects and guests.

Chill Baby ,

Awesome and informative!

One of the best pod casts I have listened to in the last year. Extremely informative! Great lineup of guests. Host is great at questioning the guest. Listening to all the shows I have missed.

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