500 episodes

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

Philosophy Talk Starters Philosophy Talk Starters

    • Education
    • 4.1 • 49 Ratings

Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

    478: Authority and Resistance

    478: Authority and Resistance

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/authority-and-resistance.

    Authority can refer to people or institutions that have the political power to make decisions, give orders, and enforce rules. It can also refer to a certain kind of expertise or knowledge that we might defer to. Sometimes we respect authority, and sometimes we resist it or even revolt against it. But where exactly does authority come from, and when, if ever, ought we defer to it? How do we challenge authority? What makes an authority figure authoritarian? And can there be anarchist forms of authority? Josh and Ken authorize a conversation with James Martel from San Francisco State University, author of "Subverting the Leviathan: Reading Thomas Hobbes as a Radical Democrat."

    • 10 min
    526: (End of) Summer Reading List 2021

    526: (End of) Summer Reading List 2021

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/summer-reading-list-2021.

    As some parts of our lives return to some kind of normal, Josh and Ray ask authors and philosophers about what's been on their summer reading lists.

    • Cory Doctorow on "Making Hay," his short story in "Make Shift: Dispatches from the Post-Pandemic Future"
    • Helen De Cruz from Saint Louis University, co-editor of "Philosophy Through Science Fiction Stories: Exploring the Boundaries of the Possible"

    Plus Michaela Bronstein from the Stanford English deparment on Richard Wright's recently-published "The Man Who Lived Underground."

    • 16 min
    530: The Ethics of Awesomeness

    530: The Ethics of Awesomeness

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/ethics-awesomeness.

    The word “awesome” once meant inspiring extreme fear or dread. Nowadays it’s mostly used as a general purpose exclamation of approval. So when we describe a person as awesome, are we saying that they exemplify some general form of excellence? Or are awesome people those who break specific social norms to generate moments of creative expression and social connection? Would the world be a better place if we all aimed to be more awesome and less sucky? Josh and Ray stand in awe of Nick Riggle from the University of San Diego, author of "On Being Awesome: A Unified Theory of How Not to Suck."

    • 10 min
    473: Envy – Vice or Virtue?

    473: Envy – Vice or Virtue?

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/envy-vice-or-virtue.

    Bertrand Russell said that envy was one of the most potent causes of unhappiness, and it's well known as one of the seven deadly sins. But is envy always a bad thing? Is it simply a petty emotion we should try to avoid, or could envy help us understand ourselves more? Is envy rooted in unhealthy comparison with others, or does it come from our own vision of excellence? Could envy even be used to improve ourselves? Josh and Ken consider whether to envy their guest, Sara Protasi from the University of Puget Sound.

    • 10 min
    529: Microaggressions

    529: Microaggressions

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/microaggressions.

    Microaggressions are small comments or questions that may be insulting or hurtful to another person because of their race, gender, sexuality, and so on. Some people consider microaggressions to be a phantom symptom of political correctness and a further sign that society has become “soft,” while others see them as a problematic way of normalizing bigotry. So how do microagressions compare to other types of moral harms? Do they add up to structural oppression, and if so, how are we to assign individual culpability? Josh and Ray engage calmly with Lauren Freeman from the University of Louisville, co-editor of "Microaggressions and Philosophy."

    • 11 min
    469: The Creative Life

    469: The Creative Life

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/creative-life.

    Parents and students alike often think that a college major defines possible career options. Yet what distinguishes today's work world from bygone times is that it's quite common for adults to have a variety of different careers in a single lifetime. So what can students do now to ensure happiness and fulfillment in all possible future careers? Are there some majors that cultivate greater creativity in our career choices? And what unique life skills can an education in the humanities offer those about to embark on adult life? Josh and Ken get creative with Scott Forstall, inventor of the iPhone and a Tony award-winning Broadway producer, in a program recorded live at Stuyvesant High School in New York City.

    • 9 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
49 Ratings

49 Ratings

idamae poopsnatch ,

Here is the reason you must pay $

I, too, was irked by these teaser shorts. I was even more irked to learn one must subscribe and pay $ to hear full podcasts and access archives. However, I emailed the show and received an explanation: Stanford U doesn’t pay a cent to support this show. Further, there is a restriction on advertising because the show is recorded on the campus. Thus, their only choice was to make it available by subscription. The cost is reasonable in the Scheme of All Things, about $6 to $8 monthly depending on the length you choose. I have blown a lot more on worse things.

Jason S Woodrow ,

Couple Minutes Not Worth It

It hurts me to rate this so poorly. I get that you have to make money and are restricted on advertising. But, c’mon! Find a way to get it done so you can put a full episode up and not just a few minutes. Is the restriction because you record on campus? Then record off campus. Or whatever works. This method of putting up a couple minutes and then wanting us to search elsewhere for a paid download is awful. It adds so much friction to the process that it grinds to a halt. It could be a really interesting podcast, but I’m afraid I’m so discouraged with this process that I’m just deleting it from my playlist. Again, it’s painful because I think the content can be excellent. But I have about ten minutes a week to download a few hours of podcasts, and there’s just too much quality stuff out there that requires a single click and is frictionless.

1sinawhile ,

why no full episodes?

Phil Talk is superb -- but why can't full episodes be downloaded. The short segments are teases.

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