23 episodes

Presenting the people and stories behind medical education at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine and our community of learners.

The Spark UCSF School of Medicine

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

Presenting the people and stories behind medical education at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine and our community of learners.

    Special Episode - Dr. Lee Jones

    Special Episode - Dr. Lee Jones

    In this episode, Mihir Joshi interviews Dr. Lee Jones, then-Associate Dean for Students at the UCSF School of Medicine. Dr Jones will join Georgetown University’s School of Medicine as the Dean of Medical Education later this summer.  
    *Please excuse any background noises as our interviewers & interviewees are speaking remotely via video chat. 
    Music by Podington Bear. Licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0. 

    • 40 min
    A Tale of Two Reopenings (Part 2)

    A Tale of Two Reopenings (Part 2)

    (Recorded in Fall 2020) This episode is part 2 of 2 in our "Tale of Two Reopenings" miniseries. Dan Cummins first speaks with Drs. Alan Shindel, MD and Tami Rowen, MD, each faculty with UCSF, about what is has been like to be parents of young children and busy physicians during COVID-19, educational and broader inequalities underscored by the virus, and the prospect of returning to in-person schooling. Dan then speaks with Hyun "Honey" Kim, a teacher at East Side Union High School in San Jose, about the difficulties of remote education and the concerns many teachers have, both for remote education and returning to in-person classes.
    Music: "Sneaker Chase" and "Operatives" by Podington Bear. Licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0.

    • 28 min
    A Tale of Two Reopenings (Part 1)

    A Tale of Two Reopenings (Part 1)

    This episode is part 1 of 2 in our "Tale of Two Reopenings" mini-series. Dan Cummins speaks with Xavier 'Abe' Cortez, a third-year medical student reflecting on his experiences returning to the clinical wards after being removed during the Covid-19 pandemic. Then, Mihir Joshi speaks with Fiona Miller, a second-year medical student and mother of three, speaking on the process of stopping and starting school both for herself and her children.
    Music: "Sneaker Chase" and "Operatives" by Podington Bear. Licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0.

     

    • 43 min
    Gender in Medicine

    Gender in Medicine

    For much of medicine’s history as a profession, it was a crime for women to be doctors. While women gained the right to study and practice medicine in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, by 1965 less than 10% of medical school graduates were women. That changed dramatically in the 1970s with the Equal Rights Amendment and Title IX. Today, more women than men are enrolled in medical school but have we reached equity? And how do other identities such as race intersect with gender? Host Tessnim Ahmad (resident) is joined by Dr. Urmimala Sarkar (Professor of Medicine) and Dr. LaMisha Hill (Director of the Multicultural Resource Center).
    Some of the data on leadership is from Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic's book, Why Do So Many Incompetent Men Become Leaders? (And How to Fix It). Special thanks to Sarah Ahmad, neurology fellow at UCSF, whose research on microaggressions helped spur the creation of this episode.
    Music: Sneaker Chase by Podington Bear. Licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0.

    • 25 min
    Climate and Health: A Busy Two-Way Street

    Climate and Health: A Busy Two-Way Street

    Host Tessnim Ahmad (MS4) discusses the health and health-system impacts of climate change with Dr. Katherine Gundling, Clinical Professor Emerita and former practice chief for the Allergy/Immunology faculty practice; Dr. Seema Gandhi, Associate Clinical Professor in the department of anesthesia; and MS3s Colin Baylen and Nuzhat Islam, who helped found the Human Health and Climate Change student group.

    • 23 min
    The Spark, Episode 18 - Burnout (Part 2)

    The Spark, Episode 18 - Burnout (Part 2)

    Burnout is part of the American vernacular. It refers to the emotional exhaustion brought on by chronic work-related stress, and can manifest as cynicism and feeling like your work lacks meaning. The term was coined in the 1970s by psychologist Herbert Freudenberger. He volunteered in a free clinic for patients with drug addiction and he used “burnout” to describe the exhaustion suffered by workers in helping professions, such as medicine, which carry rigorous demands and high ideals. While the term has been applied to other professions, burnout is particularly high in healthcare: a report released last month from the National Academy of Medicine describes rampant burnout, with up to half of doctors feeling it. There are many causes such as demanding work schedules and little autonomy. System changes have also created burdensome administrative tasks and new care models, leading some to feel the emphasis is on documentation billing and performance metrics instead of patient care. Like clinicians, trainees also suffer burnout – an estimated 60%. The path to medical school and then residency and fellowship is long and challenging, and it's becoming more competitive. The average test scores at most medical schools are rising, even while medical advances mean there's much more to learn now to be a competent physician. Host Tessnim Ahmad (MS4) is joined by Nikhil Rajapuram (MS4) and Dr. Lee Jones, Associate Dean for Students.
    Get in touch with Nikhil: Nikhil.Rajapuram@ucsf.edu
    Burnout Survey: http://bit.ly/31U5qBj
    Transcript: http://tiny.ucsf.edu/uYNXk2
    Music: Sneaker Chase by Podington Bear. Licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0.

    • 20 min

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