11 episodes

Fork U(niversity)
Not everything you put in your mouth is good for you.

There’s a lot of medical information thrown around out there. How are you to know what information you can trust, and what’s just plain old quackery? You can’t rely on your own “google fu”. You can’t count on quality medical advice from Facebook. You need a doctor in your corner.

On each episode of Your Doctor’s Orders, Dr. Terry Simpson will cut through the clutter and noise that always seems to follow the latest medical news. He has the unique perspective of a surgeon who has spent years doing molecular virology research and as a skeptic with academic credentials. He’ll help you develop the critical thinking skills so you can recognize evidence-based medicine, busting myths along the way.

The most common medical myths are often disguised as seemingly harmless “food as medicine”. By offering their own brand of medicine via foods, These hucksters are trying to practice medicine without a license. And though they’ll claim “nutrition is not taught in medical schools”, it turns out that’s a myth too. In fact, there’s an entire medical subspecialty called Culinary Medicine, and Dr. Simpson is certified as a Culinary Medicine Specialist.

Where today's nutritional advice is the realm of hucksters, Dr. Simpson is taking it back to the realm of science.

Fork U with Dr. Terry Simpson Terry Simpson

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.9 • 31 Ratings

Fork U(niversity)
Not everything you put in your mouth is good for you.

There’s a lot of medical information thrown around out there. How are you to know what information you can trust, and what’s just plain old quackery? You can’t rely on your own “google fu”. You can’t count on quality medical advice from Facebook. You need a doctor in your corner.

On each episode of Your Doctor’s Orders, Dr. Terry Simpson will cut through the clutter and noise that always seems to follow the latest medical news. He has the unique perspective of a surgeon who has spent years doing molecular virology research and as a skeptic with academic credentials. He’ll help you develop the critical thinking skills so you can recognize evidence-based medicine, busting myths along the way.

The most common medical myths are often disguised as seemingly harmless “food as medicine”. By offering their own brand of medicine via foods, These hucksters are trying to practice medicine without a license. And though they’ll claim “nutrition is not taught in medical schools”, it turns out that’s a myth too. In fact, there’s an entire medical subspecialty called Culinary Medicine, and Dr. Simpson is certified as a Culinary Medicine Specialist.

Where today's nutritional advice is the realm of hucksters, Dr. Simpson is taking it back to the realm of science.

    Collagen Supplements: Powders, Liquids, Potions, & Scams

    Collagen Supplements: Powders, Liquids, Potions, & Scams

    Common Collagen Claims (taken from actual websites selling collagen supplements):
    “improves skin elasticity,”
    “support bone and joint health,”
    “strengthen hair, skin, and nails,”
    “may benefit the bodies cellular structure,”
    “support healthy skin, bone, and joints.”
    “will feed your skin health”
    “will improve nail appearance and strength”
    “lead to a noticeable hair thickness”

    Collagen as a supplement is not regulated by the Drug division of The Food and Drug Administration
    If you look at the bottom of the websites, or on the bottles, you will see a disclaimer that the claims “have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. ” More telling is “these products are not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease.” Such a disclaimer is provided by the lawyers because if one claims to cure, treat, or diagnose an actual medical condition then it must have passed a rigorous FDA approval. To be clear, there have been no FDA studies that show collagen as a supplement treats any disease.
    Supplements commonly will use “support xyz health” – where you can fill in the blank with hair, nails, joints, skin – in the case of collagen.
    One of the main issues with supplements is “If the composition and quality of ingredients cannot be reliably ensured, the validity of research on dietary supplements is questionable. Moreover, the health of the US public is put at risk.”
    Starr RR. Too little, too late: ineffective regulation of dietary supplements in the United States. Am J Public Health. 2015;105(3):478-485. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302348
    As such, even when you look at the studies which promote collagen, or collagen byproducts, they do not meet the most basic of studies which are done to evaluate pharmaceuticals. In order to have an evaluation of a pharmaceutical you must have three phases in the trial:
    phase one is determining the dose for safety. While the supplement industry is happy if you think all supplements are good and all pharmaceuticals are evil – everything, every drug, every chemical from water to salt to formaldehyde has a toxic dose
    phase two is to test the drug for efficacy and side effects. Some people will react poorly to a supplement just as they will a drug. WE need to know what those side effects are. With a supplement people who don’t feel well often just stop it – or, like my cousin, die (yes, I had a cousin who died from a supplement).
    phase three testing is to determine if there is truly efficacy, what is the effectiveness and what is the safety.
    phase four is post-marketing surveillance in the public because even though you have gone through trials with a number of phases and under strict supervision when a drug is released to the public you have the chance to see millions of reactions.

    Thalidomide, for example, was released in Europe and even had two drug trials in the United States but was NEVER approved in the United States by the FDA because of insufficient data.
    Vioxx was a drug used worldwide and was taken off the market in 2004 because of the risk of a fatal heart attack, but was taken off after it had passed multiple drug tests previously.
    FDA testing is rigorous and specific, with the highest standards in the world. Collagen has NEVER had such rigorous testing performed. These tests have not risen to the level and in 2022 one report noted “More research is needed to establish knowledge of the effects and physiologic mechanism of collagen supplementation. Dermatologists should be aware of the unsubstantiated proclamations of collagen made by companies and in social media, as well as what evidence is established thus far, to be equipped to discuss collagen supplementation with patients.”
    Rustad AM, Nickles MA, McKenney JE, Bilimoria SN, Lio PA. Myths and media in oral collagen supplementation for the skin, nails, and hair: A review. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2022 Feb;21(2):438-443. doi: 10.1111/jocd.14567. Epub 2021 Oct 25. PMI

    • 13 min
    Bill Lagakos and The Trouble With Diets

    Bill Lagakos and The Trouble With Diets

    Diets. They work for some, but not for others. "You're just not on the right diet," purveyors of the latest trend will tell you. "You're just not on the right diet for your blood type, ethnicity, age, hair color," says another set of true believers.
    So what's right and what's wrong?
    Today on Fork U, a conversation between Dr. Terry Simpson, weight loss physician, and https://twitter.com/CaloriesProper (Dr. Bill Lagakos), nutritional biochemist and physiologist, where they expose the truth behind diets and why they may, and may not, work for you.
    And check out Bill's book, https://twitter.com/CaloriesProper (The Poor Misunderstood Calorie).
    TRANSCRIPT:Terry Simpson: Bill, there are a lot of weight loss programs out there. The one that I'm hearing the most about most often is the Keto movement, which says that they're going to cure everything from heart disease and cancer.
    Bill Lagakos: I think from a 30,000-foot view, Keto works for a lot of people. So does low fat. I like some of the recent work, the studies showing it's more about the level of processing of the food.
    So you can have a vegan diet or you can have a Ketogenic diet and as long as it is excluding a lot of processed foods, it tends to not be over eaten. And people that tout the magical benefit effects of any of these diets, 99% of the time it's due to weight loss.
    Terry Simpson: We actually had an experiment with Evo, who you met. He uhh did it several years, three or four years in a row for one month, Evo would go on a beer and sausage diet, rigorously kept his calories to 1500. We measured his liver function tests, his lipid panel.
    Every year he lost weight, kept it off, and every year his liver function was fine, surprising with the number of beers he had a day, which was limited to six. But it was, he had weight loss and he had sustained weight loss over the year with a, kind of this funky diet we sort of made up.
    Bill Lagakos: Well, that's terrific. And that's an awesome diet. I'm jealous.
    But, uh, yeah, that, that basically proves the point. I mean, even if it's not a lot of weight he lost, I think a weight loss is a major driver in a lot of the health improvements that people like to attribute to particular dietary trends.
    Terry Simpson: There doesn't seem to be a lot of long-term data in these diets. When I look at the sort of metadata, I see that if you eat really high on the low-fat side, you have a little lower lifespan. If you eat really high on the high-fat side, you have a little lower lifespan. If you have your carbs at about 55%, you seem to have a little longer lifespan.
    Is there much good data saying one diet versus another, other than the Mediterranean, has great long-term results?
    Bill Lagakos: I don't think so. I don't think it comes down to macros at all. I think that there's the confounding in those studies is so deep that I don't think the macronutrient composition of your diet is going to be what kills you in the end.
    Terry Simpson: Part of your job is helping people lose weight. What are sort of the big messages you try and get through to people?
    Bill Lagakos: One of the biggest things is the importance of adherence, which is why I try to say, you know, what do I know that, that you can adhere to 100%? It's what you've been doing because you've been doing it. So let's try and find the lowest hanging fruit that we can change so it doesn't turn your whole world upside down, which is something that would probably never work.
    Terry Simpson: So in other words, you're not going to change a Keto into a vegan or a vegan into a Keto.
    Bill Lagakos: Correct. However, I don't like to put those two at odds because there is, there have been a few studies on the vegan Ketogenic diet.
    Terry Simpson: So give me an example of some of the things for our audience, some of the things that they can do to incorporate it in their life now to help them lose weight and just feel a little better about themselves.
    Bill Lagakos: Well,

    • 26 min
    Is It The Mediterranean Diet Or The Mediterranean Lifestyle?

    Is It The Mediterranean Diet Or The Mediterranean Lifestyle?

    In science, we don’t look to confirm what we know; we want to find out something that we don’t know. We love it when science proves us wrong.
    If your doctor told you that you have heart disease, were pre-diabetic, or said you should eat healthier, they likely will tell you to follow the Mediterranean Diet.
    When I introduce the Mediterranean Diet to my patients I get a response like this:
    “Sounds great! Who doesn’t love red wine, olive oil, and fresh Italian tomatoes?”
    This is followed by asking for a recommendation of a book of recipes from the Mediterranean.
    The Mediterranean Diet seems to invoke sitting on a rooftop restaurant in Positano sipping wine while munching on fruit and waiting for pasta. The food and wine are part of the lifestyle, as is relaxing and breathing in the surroundings. You might not be on a rooftop restaurant in Positano (lucky if you are). You might be looking in your yard and seeing a squirrel or rabbit or flowers, and taking in that time to breathe and relax and maybe the glass of wine and thus transporting that lifestyle to your home.
    Which do you think is better for your heart and your brain: rushing home from a stressful day at work, grabbing a martini and letting the alcohol calm you or going outside, taking a deep breath of fresh air, maybe having a glass of wine?
    In the original Greek, the word “diata” was used to describe how one should live, what one should eat, how to maintain a healthy body. It is from diata that our word “diet” derives. There is no doubt what you eat impacts your health.
    While the origin of the Mediterranean Diet is what ‘some’ people in the Mediterranean ate, but that isn’t what we (doctors, scientists, registered dieticians) mean today. Over the last fifty years over 150 foods have been studied to see their effect on humans, for better or for ill.
    Years of research, studied on millions of people, and yet most people have the view of the Mediterranean lifestyle as hummus and fish. So let me introduce this diet, and this lifestyle to you, and why it may be the most important lifestyle you should understand.
    In spite of all the noise on the internet about low carb/keto, vegan, or other diets/lifestyles you will find that the Mediterranean Diet is consistently ranked as the number one or two diet in the United States.
    That is based on many studies showing how the diet leads to a decrease in heart disease, lower blood pressure, better control of diabetes, fewer strokes, and lowering the risk of dementia.
    The Mediterranean diet is neither low carbohydrate (it is about 50% carbohydrate) nor low fat (it is about 30% fat). It is not high protein (it is about 20% protein). Improvement in your health comes from eating certain foods, and not from counting macros (proteins, carbs, fats, and alcohol). Weight loss and better health are both touted from those who profess “low carb” or “low fat” and yet weight loss with the Mediterranean lifestyle is equal to or better than the low fat or low carb “diets”.
    Those who claim low-carbohydrate diets are the best for diabetes are often stunned that the Mediterranean diet provides superior long-term results for diabetes and insulin resistance. While they rightly point out that a diet rich in whole grains and fruits, will produce transient spikes in blood glucose levels, the long-term results from the Mediterranean lifestyle are superior to avoiding those foods – providing better control for diabetes.
    Back to those categories: Vegetables, Fruit and nuts, legumes, whole grains, meats, dairy, fats and oils, fish, and alcohol.
    Each one of those categories is worth a point, so you have a chance to get nine points total. For some categories, you get a point for eating a given quantity of food (more for some, less for others). We determine adherence to the diet based on how many points a day a person gets on average. The closer to nine points a person has on a daily basis, the healthier they are over...

    • 8 min
    Wine: Terroir Tales and Fables, You Can't Taste the Soil

    Wine: Terroir Tales and Fables, You Can't Taste the Soil

    In Vino, Veritas – or In Wine, Truth – by Pliny the Elder
    When the Holy Roman Empire was forming Charlemagne gave lands to the monks in order for them to plant vineyards to make wine for the Eucharist. Those first vineyards, planted by Benedictine monks, make some of the classic wines of all time. Wine was in France centuries prior to Charlemagne, but it was those monks that we have a provenance of today’s wine. It was also from those Monks that we got the concept of terroir.
    Today terroir is the “in” thing that wine sommeliers will talk about. One of the myths is that you can taste the soil of the wine. This traces back to those monks who would taste the soil in order to determine where the best wines would come from. What those monks didn’t know was that the vines get their ingredients from carbon dioxide and sunlight.
    Wine geology is complex, and recently Alex Maltman, a distinguished professor emeritus of geology, published a book about the geology of wine. His book: Vineyards, Rocks, and Soils The Wine Lover’s Guide to Geology is a reference guide for those who want to know more about the geology of the wines they are drinking.
    Dr. Maltman was also a guest on the podcast where we talked about wine geology and dispelled the myth about tasting the soil.
    Dr. Maltman notes that the chalk of Champagne is the soil, and the soil is important to drainage of the vine, but the plant doesn’t take up chalk (which is a silicate compound), and when the inorganic compounds of chalk are broken down, and some of those minerals are taken up they are tasteless.
    What people taste are the many organic compounds that the plant makes from the carbon from carbon dioxide through photosynthesis and coded on the vineyards DNA. You also taste the byproducts of fermentation – as those compounds are put through yeast, bacteria. Where the confusion lies is that some of the organic compounds of the soil smell like some of the products of fermentation of the wine.
    The monks didn’t know about photosynthesis, nor did they know about DNA encoding for the proteins and organic chemicals, nor did they understand the complex chemistry of fermentation. They just knew wine is delicious- and sometimes the soil tastes a bit like the wine, so they assumed that the vine took up the soil and put it into the grape (the wine takes up the water, not the soil).
    Today Sommeliers everywhere love to talk about the geology of where the wine you are buying came from. They love telling you a story – because we love stories about our food. As Maltman points out, we love to know the provenance of our food, and in an era of large multinational corporations, wine is one of the few places you can know about where a grape was grown, harvested, what were the conditions that year, what is the makeup of the land – even what side of the mountain that wine came from.
    But what you cannot taste, is the soil from the rocks. That, my friends, is not only impossible because of how and what the plant takes from the soil (water and ionic forms of inorganic compounds, as Maltman points out in his book) but ignores the most glorious and complex part of wine.
    In our conversation, Maltman talks about the grapes that no one has heard of that are making a comeback in Greece, Croatia, and Eastern Europe.
    Oh, and we bust the myths of resveratrol and people who want to add this as a supplement for weight loss, long life, etc.
    -----
    http://forku.com (Fork U) is part of the https://your-doctors-orders.captivate.fm (Your Doctors Orders network of podcasts) and is hosted by noted physician and surgeon Dr. Terry Simpson.
    https://www.tiktok.com/@drterrysimpson? (Follow Dr. Terry Simpson on TikTok) for bite-sized content on healthy eating
    Visit https://terrysimpson.com/ (TerrySimpson.com) for additional details on Dr. Simpson
    https://twitter.com/drterrysimpson?lang=en (Follow @DrTerrySimpson on Twitter) for skepticism, travel, and much more.

    Fork U is produced by...

    • 26 min
    Ten Day Holiday Diet - Again!

    Ten Day Holiday Diet - Again!

    This episode originally aired for the holidays in 2018. But it's solid advice, so we're playing it again, Sam!
    Diet season is soon upon us, but what happens if we have a system where you can lose weight during the times when you are most vulnerable: holidays, vacations, new relationships.
    Not a “lifestyle” or “long term” diet - but a simple ten-day plan to lose weight during the times when you need it.
    Full details: https://www.yourdoctorsorders.com/2018/12/10-day-holiday-diet/
    -----
    Produced and distributed by Simpler Media
    Follow Dr. Terry Simpson on Twitter

    • 9 min
    Microplastics in Fish, in Fruit, in Water

    Microplastics in Fish, in Fruit, in Water

    The term "microplastics" was originally described in 2004 for plastic particles that are less than 5 millimeters in diameter, originally being seen on beaches. But everywhere scientists have looked on planet earth, they have been found. From fruit, vegetables, nuts, beer, baby bottles, in the air, in our water.
    Some have estimated that we ingest 100,000 microplastic particles per day or the equivalent of a credit card of microplastic in a year. That number will only increase, as we are producing over 400 million tons of plastics a year, and we have over 5 billion tons of plastics in landfills. Plastic degrades over time, from sunlight, from ocean water, from wind. Some of those plastics become so small they cross the blood-brain barrier in humans.
    These plastics come in all shapes and sizes. As they are exposed to the environment and degrade, they become smaller and smaller. They come with different types of plastics with different reactions, but mostly we don't know.
    The problem is we don't know what these plastics are doing to us. We don't know what the toxic levels of microplastics are. We don't know what, if any, physiological systems that microplastics would interfere with. We don't know if they increase cancer, heart disease, auto-immune disease, dementia, liver cirrhosis - we just don't know. We don't know if they inhibit the growth of children if they cause the loss of fetuses in women who are pregnant.
    We do know on larger levels; plastics cause issues with marine mammals. Shopping bags in the water look like the turtle's favorite feast, a jellyfish, and they will consume those, and those plastics become stuck in the turtle's digestive system clogging up their intestines and leading to their death. Most have seen the turtle whose nose was stuffed with a plastic straw. What we don't know is what happens when the small microplastics enter into cells, or cross the blood-brain barrier, or land in our lungs. Those finds led to the laws to decrease plastic one-use bags and plastic straws, but that is just the tip of what might be a more serious problem.
    We know that mice fed microplastics had lower sperm counts, smaller offspring, but again, mice are not men. We also don't know what the different types of microplastics will do - one type might be harmful, another type might be benign.
    Some plastics might pass through us like fiber, indigestible matter that has no consequence other than moving stool along.
    What can you do if you are worried? If you feed your child formula, use bottles instead of plastic. If you use your microwave, don't reheat food in plastic containers. Try not to use plastic containers for storage, and don't dispose of them so quickly. Water bottles - well, time to use reusable water bottles made of metal or glass.
    For now, we can do a small part, but it isn't the entire part. It is a problem that may be a larger problem or less of a problem. But it probably is an issue. We already know that some plastics do cause endocrine disruption, and those products have been outlawed.
    But it isn't just a marine problem; whether you are a vegan, pescatarian, vegetarian, omnivore, or carnivore, there will be plastics in everything you eat.
    -----
    http://forku.com (Fork U) is part of the https://your-doctors-orders.captivate.fm (Your Doctors Orders network of podcasts) and is hosted by the noted physician and surgeon Dr. Terry Simpson.
    https://www.tiktok.com/@drterrysimpson? (Follow Dr. Terry Simpson on TikTok) for bite-sized content on healthy eating
    Visit https://terrysimpson.com/ (TerrySimpson.com) for additional details on Dr. Simpson
    https://twitter.com/drterrysimpson?lang=en (Follow @DrTerrySimpson on Twitter) for skepticism, travel, and much more.

    Fork U is produced by http://simpler.media (Simpler Media) and is recorded in the studios of https://myproducergirl.wixsite.com/producergirl (ProducerGirl Productions).

    • 3 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
31 Ratings

31 Ratings

slebsn ,

Knowledge is power

Dr Simpson pulls no punches when giving you the facts but delivered in a way that is interesting with heaping scoops of wit and humor.

world Extreme chef ,

Great stuff here! Or not stuffed

Great podcast Terry appreciate your myth busts always learning

KatrinaGS ,

Love this food podcast!

If you're an avid fan of all things food, biology and science - this is a GREAT podcast. Not only is the host a Doctor - but if you look deeper - he's a bariatric surgeon - which really helps with his view on how food works within our bodies - not just tastebuds! I especially LOVE the food myths he continually busts! A true and verified show - with not just some "host" but a man who's gone to the University of Chicago, and backs all his facts with anotated notes - love it.

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