7 episodes

Whose Stories? is a podcast about children’s books, diversity, and the role of archives, brought to you by Newcastle University and Seven Stories: The National Centre for Children’s Books. In the first season of our podcast, we’re exploring the story of children’s books and Black Britain. You’ll hear from authors, illustrators, and changemakers in the world of children’s literature, including the multi-award-winning writers John Agard, Valerie Bloom, and Beverley Naidoo. You’ll be introduced to Seven Stories’ unique collection of archival material and learn about why building a truly representative national archive of children’s books is so critical, and we’ll draw on the expertise of researchers at Newcastle University to put a spotlight on issues of diversity and representation in children’s literature and its history within these contexts. Ultimately, we’ll show you what we can gain from making children’s books more inclusive – and what’s lost when the UK’s children don’t find themselves reflected in the words (and worlds) they find on the page. Subscribe and stay tuned.

Whose Stories‪?‬ Seven Stories

    • Arts

Whose Stories? is a podcast about children’s books, diversity, and the role of archives, brought to you by Newcastle University and Seven Stories: The National Centre for Children’s Books. In the first season of our podcast, we’re exploring the story of children’s books and Black Britain. You’ll hear from authors, illustrators, and changemakers in the world of children’s literature, including the multi-award-winning writers John Agard, Valerie Bloom, and Beverley Naidoo. You’ll be introduced to Seven Stories’ unique collection of archival material and learn about why building a truly representative national archive of children’s books is so critical, and we’ll draw on the expertise of researchers at Newcastle University to put a spotlight on issues of diversity and representation in children’s literature and its history within these contexts. Ultimately, we’ll show you what we can gain from making children’s books more inclusive – and what’s lost when the UK’s children don’t find themselves reflected in the words (and worlds) they find on the page. Subscribe and stay tuned.

    S1 Ep. 3: "If we could change where we are, how would we change it and what would we do?"

    S1 Ep. 3: "If we could change where we are, how would we change it and what would we do?"

    In the past two episodes of Whose Stories?,  we’ve explored the history of Black  British children's literature, spoken to authors about their writing experiences, and dug deep into the Seven Stories archive. But in this episode, we’re looking towards the future and discussing the barriers that stand in the way of achieving a truly diverse publishing industry, and we’ll be speaking with some of the individuals who are driving change.

    • 41 min
    Sneak Peek: Episode 3

    Sneak Peek: Episode 3

    In this sneak peek of Episode 3, Dr. Lucy Pearson (Newcastle University) talks about the strengths and weaknesses of the Carneige Medal, one of the most prestigious prizes for children's literature, which has only twice been awarded to book athored by a person of colour. 

    • 2 min
    S1 Ep. 2: "We write what we know, we write what's important to us."

    S1 Ep. 2: "We write what we know, we write what's important to us."

    In the second episode of Whose Stories?, we’re digging deep into the history of Black British children’s literature and the careers of some of the leading authors and illustrators whose work is being saved for future generations at Seven Stories. We’ll hear about the experiences that inspired them, examine challenges within the publishing industry, and explore the history of Black Britain through the lens of Seven Stories’ unique collection of manuscripts and archives.

    • 51 min
    Sneak Peek: Episode 2

    Sneak Peek: Episode 2

    In this sneak peek of the second episode of Whose Stories?, we hear author and illustrator Errol Lloyd talk about prejudice, culture shock, and the ways in which children's literature can offer new ways into understanding these issues.

    • 3 min
    S1 Ep. 1: "I wasn't in books, so why should I read them?"

    S1 Ep. 1: "I wasn't in books, so why should I read them?"

    With the help of storytellers, publishers, the Seven Stories archives, and experts from Newcastle university, the first episode of Whose Stories? explores why it’s so important for children to read diverse books and why we need more Black Brits in every aspect of children’s literature. We’ll head over to Seven Stories Museum to talk about their aim to curate a truly representative national archive of children’s books, and we’ll discuss the fact that - while children growing up in the UK today come from a broad variety of cultures, families and backgrounds - the stories written about and for them don’t reflect the diverse reality of the nation we’re living in. And that lack of representation matters, because when children and young people see themselves in the books they read, they are empowered. And when they don’t see themselves, that absence negates the fundamental sense of belonging which every child needs - and deserves - to thrive.

    • 40 min
    Whose Stories?

    Whose Stories?

    Introducing Whose Stories?, a podcast about children’s books, diversity, and the role of archives, brought to you by Newcastle University and Seven Stories: The National Centre for Children’s Books. In the first season of our podcast, we’re exploring the story of children’s books and Black Britain. You’ll hear from authors, illustrators, and changemakers in the world of children’s literature, including the multi-award-winning writers John Agard, Valerie Bloom, and Beverley Naidoo. You’ll be introduced to Seven Stories’ unique collection of archival material and learn about why building a truly representative national archive of children’s books is so critical, and we’ll draw on the expertise of researchers at Newcastle University to put a spotlight on issues of diversity and representation in children’s literature and its history within these contexts. Ultimately, we’ll show you what we can gain from making children’s books more inclusive – and what’s lost when the UK’s children don’t find themselves reflected in the words (and worlds) they find on the page. Subscribe and stay tuned.
    This trailer was produced for the Vital North Partnership by Better Lemon Creative Audio. It was written, produced, and narrated by Rufaro Faith Mazarura. Editing and Executive Production by Hannah Hethmon.

    • 3 min

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