334 episodes

I believe anyone can share a message to change the world, and podcasting is the BEST way to spread that message! I'm Daniel J. Lewis and this is where I give you the guts and teach you the tools to launch or improve your own podcast for sharing your passions and finding success! I cover all things podcasting: audio gear, video equipment, editing software, WordPress and plugins, social media promotion tools, marketing, and more with understandable in-depth information and easy-to-follow steps. If you want to know how to podcast or grow the show you already have, this show is for you! Have a podcasting question or suggestion? Email Feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com or call (903) 231-2221. Please subscribe and I will give you THE AUDACITY to podcast!

The Audacity to Podcast Daniel J. Lewis

    • Technology
    • 4.7 • 356 Ratings

I believe anyone can share a message to change the world, and podcasting is the BEST way to spread that message! I'm Daniel J. Lewis and this is where I give you the guts and teach you the tools to launch or improve your own podcast for sharing your passions and finding success! I cover all things podcasting: audio gear, video equipment, editing software, WordPress and plugins, social media promotion tools, marketing, and more with understandable in-depth information and easy-to-follow steps. If you want to know how to podcast or grow the show you already have, this show is for you! Have a podcasting question or suggestion? Email Feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com or call (903) 231-2221. Please subscribe and I will give you THE AUDACITY to podcast!

    7 Ways to Improve Your Podcast and Promotion with Jarvis AI

    7 Ways to Improve Your Podcast and Promotion with Jarvis AI

    Do you want to improve the content on your podcast? Jarvis (also known as “Conversion AI”) can help! It uses artificial intelligence and machine learning to generate blog post ideas, headlines, phrases, captions for images, and more.







    How good is it? That first paragraph was generated using Jarvis's “Blog Post Intro Paragraph” template! And all the italicized text in this article was generated or enhanced by Jarvis with little to no tweaking from me.







    Click here to try Jarvis yourself with a FREE 5-day trial!







    (As an affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases through this link. But I recommend products I truly believe in, regardless of earnings.)







    Unless otherwise noted, the following input descriptions and text were provided by my email subscribers.







    1. Improve your podcast descriptions







    Jarvis is a nifty little tool that will take your podcast description and make it the best you've ever seen. With just three clicks, Jarvis automatically finds all of those perfect words to fit in there without any effort on your part!







    Jarvis offers multiple frameworks to help market products:







    * AIDA: attention ➜ interest ➜ desire ➜ action* PAS: problem ➜ agitate ➜ solution* BAB: before ➜ after ➜ bridge







    I ran the same podcast title and description through all three of these frameworks to demonstrate the different results you can get.







    Podcast: ExtraVirgin Food and TravelDescription: ExtraVirgin is a podcast for gourmands who love to travel and travellers who love good food. Join your hosts, food and travel journalist Natascha Mirosch and bon vivant Samantha Donsky, who between them have eaten their way around more than 60 countries, as they meet the passionate people who make wandering the world so rewarding and so delicious.AIDA framework:Join us on our journey as we explore the world and all of its delicious food.We’ve eaten our way around more than 60 countries, meeting passionate people who make wandering the world so rewarding and so delicious.You won't want to miss out on this podcast that will make you hungry while also making you laugh!Subscribe now to get all our episodes free!PAS framework:Traveling can be a lonely and stressful experience, especially when you are constantly surrounded by unfamiliar food.The best way to combat this is to learn about the local cuisine so you know what ingredients to look out for at the supermarket. But it's also important to meet people who live there, not just tourists. You need locals as your guide through their culture and customs.That's where ExtraVirgin Food & Travel comes in! We'll help you understand how locals eat and travel in different countries around the world while sharing our tips on how we've made these experiences even better with our own hacks! Join us as we explore new cultures together from a traveller’s perspective while eating some of the most amazing food that each country has to offer!BAB framework:You love to travel, but you also love good food. However, finding the best restaurants and local eateries is always a challenge.Imagine having a podcast that tells you about the best places to eat in every city you visit. It's like having your own personal tour guide who knows all of the hidden gems and where to find them!Join Natascha Mirosch and Samantha Donsky as they take on the world one bite at a time with ExtraVirgin Food & Travel!







    2. Brainstorm episode topics







    I've spoken before on ways to brainstorm episode ideas for your podcast. But this AI can make it much easier!

    • 37 min
    Labeling Podcasters: Amateur vs. Skilled

    Labeling Podcasters: Amateur vs. Skilled

    How serious are you about improving and growing your podcast?







    In this miniseries, I'll explore the different labels used to describe podcasters.







    The labels “amateur” and “skilled” do indicate quality. So while it's okay to stay in one group and own it with pride, I do encourage you to seek to move into the “skilled” group.







    What are amateur podcasters?







    The late Steve Jobs once referred to podcasts as “amateur hour” in one of his last Apple keynotes. But don't let the term “amateur” be demeaning. Instead, consider it a way to describe where you might be now, but not where you're staying.







    1. Amateur podcasters accept where they are







    They may not be content with where their podcasts are, but they often don't consider how they need to improve and grow themselves.







    2. Amateur podcasters have vague or no goals







    If an amateur podcaster has goals, they're often rather vague, such as growing or monetizing.







    Vague goals look for vague successes.







    For example, if an amateur podcaster says merely, “I want to grow my audience.” Then if they get even one more person listening, then they accomplished their goal. But did they really want only one additional listener?







    Or if they say merely, “I want to monetize my podcast,” and they make 3¢. Then they monetized their podcast.







    3. Amateur podcasters ask broad questions







    I often see the same overly broad questions asked in online podcasting groups. For example, “How do I grow my podcast?” “What's the best microphone?” “Who is the best podcast host?”







    4. Amateur podcasters say “good enough”







    There are big differences between being resourceful under limitations and quitting when something seems “good enough.”







    When something is “good enough,” it probably actually isn't.







    5. Amateur podcasters want free options







    Yes, there are many budget constraints on podcasters of all types. There's nothing wrong with using free options. But I think looking for only free options can indicate commitment levels.







    For example, Anchor currently hosts almost half of all valid podcast feeds in Apple Podcasts, but more than half of those shows have 3 or fewer episodes. And there are more 1-episode shows on Anchor than the total number of shows any other podcast-hosting provider hosts. [Private data via My Podcast Reviews.]







    The first time I revealed this data in “What New Data Suggests about Podcast-Hosting Customers” from December 2018, I suggested that the tool itself is not creating dead shows, but the extremely low barriers to entry (and with very little education) was probably making it easier for low-commitment people to start podcasts.







    Does simply paying for something help you be more committed? Perhaps. Or maybe more-committed people are already willing to pay for stuff.







    6. Amateur podcasters are jealous of others' success







    Spotify has been making some big moves in the podcasting industry. They started getting disruptive with the recent announcement that The Joe Rogan Experience will soon become exclusive to Spotify—not simply be on Spotify, but be only on Spotify and nowhere else: not Apple Podcast...

    • 31 min
    Labeling Podcasters: Independent vs. Corporate

    Labeling Podcasters: Independent vs. Corporate

    Who has the final say for your podcast?







    In this miniseries, I'll explore the different labels used to describe podcasters and encourage you to own your label with pride!







    An aside before diving in, I never liked the term “procasters” because it made it seem like indie podcasters couldn't be professionals at what they do.







    How are independent and corporate podcasters similar







    Independent (or “indie”) podcasters and corporate podcasters share the same similarities I shared in my previous episode about hobbyist vs. professional podcasters. Here's that list for your convenience.







    * Both can have excellence* Both can have passion* Both can have audiences of any size* Both can “PROFIT”







    So let's jump to what sets them apart!







    What are indie podcasters?







    1. Indie podcasters make their own decisions







    “The buck stops here” for an indie podcaster! They make their own decisions, big and small. They might involve their cohosts, community, or other collaborators. But everything about their podcast is their own to choose.







    2. Indie podcasters are agile







    On a whim, indie podcasters can change technology, launch a donation system, create a new product, redesign their branding, and much more. There's no approval process and usually the only delays are in how much time it takes to implement something, or how long it takes for that delivery to arrive.







    3. Indie podcasters made the podcasting industry







    Don't let anyone mislead you! No broadcast company or executive invented podcasting—it was indies: Dave Winer (who created RSS) and Adam Curry. And the foundations of podcasting are very much “pirate radio.”







    4. Indie podcasters are resourceful







    Indie podcasters are used to working with what they have or very limited resources. They're well-acquainted with recording in a closet or under a blanket, using pantyhose for a pop filter, or hacking things together.







    5. Indie podcasters are the majority







    Of the nearly 1.1 million podcasts at this time, I estimate there are only a couple or few thousand podcasts (under 1%) are hosted by corporate podcasters. The rest are the indies!







    6. Indie podcasters reach the niches







    There's almost no niche too small! You can find a podcast on almost anything and usually hosted by people passionate about and highly experienced in those topics.







    7. Indie podcasters want (and deserve) to be involved in the podcasting industry







    No matter the direction the industry goes, I think no one cares more about it than the independent podcasters. Sometimes, it even seems like podcasting is a way of life to an indie.







    If you're an independent podcaster, please get involved in The Podcast Academy to ensure the indie majority is represented.







    What are corporate podcasters?







    1. Corporate podcasters are subject to external oversight







    “Design by committee” is a phrase that makes almost any designer cringe. Corporate podcasters have committees, executives, corporate interests, sponsors, and even legal regulations often dictating what can and can't be done.







    2. Corporate podcasters move slowly and deliberately

    • 29 min
    Labeling Podcasters: Hobbyist vs. Professional

    Labeling Podcasters: Hobbyist vs. Professional

    Do you podcast for the fun or art of it, or to build a business?







    In this miniseries, I'll explore the different labels used to describe podcasters and encourage you to own your label with pride!







    How are hobbyist and professional podcasters similar?







    1. Hobbyists and professionals can have excellence







    Neither label indicates quality levels. It's possible for hobbyists to rival “professional quality,” and it's also possible for professionals to sound like “amateur hour.”







    2. Hobbyists and professionals can have passion







    No one has exclusivity on passion in podcasting. Pardon the pun, but anyone can be “on fire” for anything.







    3. Hobbyists and professionals can have audiences of any size







    Whether a narrow niche or a broad topic, there are no upper or lower limits for hobbyists or professionals.







    4. Hobbyists and professionals can “PROFIT”







    Podcasting PROFIT™ is popularity, relationships, opportunities, fun, income, and tangibles. These are all attainable for hobbyists and professionals. Neither has a monopoly on success.







    What is a hobbyist podcaster?







    1. A hobbyist podcaster focuses on the experience







    Satisfaction is often the main goal of a hobbyist podcaster, regardless of their topic. That satisfaction could come from laughing, talking about your favorite subjects, inspiring people, and more.







    2. A hobbyist podcaster has few pressures







    Hobbyists are often not burdened by many deadlines, expectations, bills, and such.







    3. A hobbyist podcaster reserves podcasting for “nights and weekends”







    Like most other hobbies, podcasting for a hobbyist is probably something they do when the more important things are done. Podcasting comes after the job, after family time, and after household responsibilities.







    4. A hobbyist podcaster spends for bills or pleasure







    Usually, a hobbyist is spending money on the necessities of podcasting, or simply enjoying any kind of extra income they get.







    What is a professional podcaster?







    1. A professional podcaster focuses on the outcome







    For a professional, podcasting needs a return on their investment; it needs to grow a business or market something.







    2. A professional podcaster is running a business







    Like other parts of running a business, podcasting income and expenses will be tracked, reported, and deducted for budgeting and taxes.







    3. A professional podcaster integrates podcasting into their strategy







    Podcasting is part of the “day job” for a professional podcaster.







    4. A professional podcaster invests in returns







    When a professional podcaster PROFITs, they reinvest that into the business. That could be investing in people or resources to make podcasting easier or better. It could be investing into marketing to grow the podcast or business.







    What are you? Are you a hobbyist podcaster, or a professional podcaster?







    Need podcasting help?







    If you need one-on-one help, or you haven't launched your podcast, yet, click here to request a personal coaching and consulting session and we'll connect you with a podcasting expert we trust!

    • 26 min
    7 Kinds of Podcast Images for Marketing and Branding

    7 Kinds of Podcast Images for Marketing and Branding

    Even though podcasting is usually an audio-only experience, attractive images can enhance your podcast branding and help you promote your podcast better! Here are suggestions to consider for podcast-level and episode-level images.







    How images help your podcast







    Establishing and reinforcing visual branding







    Are Disney's movies Frozen and Frozen II related to Pixar's movie Onward?







    Many of the 5by5 podcast network's cover art shares the same style, making the relationship obvious.















    Marketing your episodes







    Artwork makes your podcast look a lot better when shared in social networks like Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn.







    Having images, especially for each episode, can help enable you to promote your podcast in visual-only platforms, like Pinterest and Instagram.







    Engaging your audience







    Look at No Agenda‘s art generator.







    Communicating without words







    “A picture is worth 1,000 words.”







    1. Square image for podcast apps and Instagram















    2. Crop-friendly wide image for video and social















    * 16:9 for video* 1,200 × 628 for Facebook and Twitter







    3. Crop-friendly tall image for Pinterest















    * 2:3 for Pinterest* 9:16 for video stories







    4. Thumbnail image for your website















    I suggest you design for a square crop but with margin for different ratios.







    Here's what square episode images look like on The Audacity to Podcast's homepage.







    5. Background image for creativity















    What I love being able to use background images in SecondLine Themes as my WordPress theme! You can easily add a color overlay, style effects, and even blur your images.







    Ensure it doesn't conflict with text over it.







    How this episode's background image looks, thanks to Tusant from SecondLine Themes.







    6. “Open” image for audiograms















    Headliner and Wavve are great tools for making audiograms.







    7. Show images for profile branding







    Visit Sprout Social's guide to social-media image sizes.







    How to make these images







    Hire a professional







    * Mark Des Cotes from Podcast Branding* DesignCrowd* a href="https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/99designs" title="Logo Design,

    • 41 min
    Are There Too Many Podcasts?

    Are There Too Many Podcasts?

    On Friday, April 17, 2020, Apple Podcasts surpassed 1 million valid podcasts in their catalog. So have we reached “peak podcast”? Is it too late to start a podcast? Will your podcast only be lost in the sea of over 1 million other podcasts?







    Short answer: NO!







    Here's why.







    1. Saturation is a matter of perspective







    Listen to “There Are Now More than 800,000 Podcasts and More Industry Stats” for more information behind my Podcast Industry Statistics site.







    According to the top results in Google searches:







    * There are more than 31 million YouTube channels* There are more than 97 million songs* There are more than 140 million books* There are more than 600 million blogs







    2. Not all podcasts are active







    3. Not all podcasts are consistent







    4. Your niche is much smaller







    5. Your podcast could do what others don't, can't, or won't







    6. There will always be ways to innovate

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
356 Ratings

356 Ratings

Gfish BYU!!!! ,

I love this podcast

I love this podcast Because it has helped me a lot on my podcast “ What’s That”
I have had that podcast for about a year and a half and this podcast still finds ways to help me be better

Plz give me a shout out or leave a review on my podcasts
Thanks

Daniel J. Lewis ,

Will be back someday!

Thank you, everyone, for the support!

randellwmartin ,

Wow! This podcast is just what I needed to hear!

As I’m prepping for my own podcast, I’ve been listening to the Audacity to Podcast. It is an excellent source of great information on the subject. Thank you for what you do Mr Lewis!
- Randy Martin (soon to be) host of the IRSProb.com podcast “Helping Good People with IRS Problems”

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