10 episodes

This course is a single-quarter, focused follow-up to the yearlong Mini Med School course sequence offered in 2009–10 by Stanford Continuing Studies and the Stanford Medical School. The course focuses on diseases of the heart and cardiovascular system, the leading cause of death and disability for both men and women as well as the most common cause of serious birth defects. Addressing these challenges, the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute catalyzes a unique collaboration among clinicians, translational and basic scientists, and engineers, fostering the development of novel approaches to diagnosing, treating, and ultimately preventing cardiovascular disease.

Featuring a dozen distinguished faculty from Stanford’s Cardiovascular Institute, this course offers students a dynamic introduction to the world of cardiovascular biology, health and disease, and the groundbreaking changes taking place in medical research right here at Stanford.

The course begins with an overview of how the cardiovascular system works, setting the stage for more in-depth talks by experts on topics such as: how heart disease affects men, women, and children; the role genes play in cardiovascular disease; how we can mend a broken heart through new surgical approaches, technologies, and bioengineering (including stem cells); the cardiovascular risks and benefits associated with performance athletics; new innovations in heart imaging; and more.

Mini Med School: The Heart Stanford

    • Health & Fitness
    • 3.9 • 25 Ratings

This course is a single-quarter, focused follow-up to the yearlong Mini Med School course sequence offered in 2009–10 by Stanford Continuing Studies and the Stanford Medical School. The course focuses on diseases of the heart and cardiovascular system, the leading cause of death and disability for both men and women as well as the most common cause of serious birth defects. Addressing these challenges, the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute catalyzes a unique collaboration among clinicians, translational and basic scientists, and engineers, fostering the development of novel approaches to diagnosing, treating, and ultimately preventing cardiovascular disease.

Featuring a dozen distinguished faculty from Stanford’s Cardiovascular Institute, this course offers students a dynamic introduction to the world of cardiovascular biology, health and disease, and the groundbreaking changes taking place in medical research right here at Stanford.

The course begins with an overview of how the cardiovascular system works, setting the stage for more in-depth talks by experts on topics such as: how heart disease affects men, women, and children; the role genes play in cardiovascular disease; how we can mend a broken heart through new surgical approaches, technologies, and bioengineering (including stem cells); the cardiovascular risks and benefits associated with performance athletics; new innovations in heart imaging; and more.

    • video
    1. Mending a Broken Heart (September 27, 2011)

    1. Mending a Broken Heart (September 27, 2011)

    Daniel Bernstein gives an introduction to the course as well as briefly discussing the heart and some of the diseases that will be discussed during the quarter. (September 27, 2011)

    • 1 hr 49 min
    • video
    2. Keeping the Beat: New Technologies to Treat Heart Rhythm Disorders (October 4, 2011)

    2. Keeping the Beat: New Technologies to Treat Heart Rhythm Disorders (October 4, 2011)

    Paul Wang and Anne Dubin talk about the risks of heart rhythm disorders both in adults and young children and the common methods used to combat such diseases. (October 4, 2011)

    • 1 hr 36 min
    • video
    3. Innovations in Cardiovascular Surgery (October 11, 2011)

    3. Innovations in Cardiovascular Surgery (October 11, 2011)

    Robert Robbins and Alan Yeung talk about recent advances in cardiovascular surgery, what it means for patients, and how the envision the field advancing in the future. (October 11, 2011)

    • 1 hr 30 min
    • video
    4. Bioengineering Tools for Cardiovascular Applications (October 18, 2011)

    4. Bioengineering Tools for Cardiovascular Applications (October 18, 2011)

    Beth Pruitt discusses her work in human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiac myosites and future opportunities to use heart cells for regenerative therapy. (October 18, 2011)

    • 1 hr 53 min
    • video
    5. Mending a Broken Heart: Will Stem Cells Be the Answer for Cardiac Repair (October 25, 2011)

    5. Mending a Broken Heart: Will Stem Cells Be the Answer for Cardiac Repair (October 25, 2011)

    Joseph Wu explains how stem cells may be the answer to repairing hearts that have failed. Some of his research has been focused on techniques to push cardiovascular medicine forward. (October 25, 2011)

    • 2 hr 2 min
    • video
    6. The Athletic Heart: Cardiovascular Risks/Benefits in Performance Athletics (November 1, 2011)

    6. The Athletic Heart: Cardiovascular Risks/Benefits in Performance Athletics (November 1, 2011)

    Euan Ashley gives a presentation on some of the typical cardiovascular symptoms of high performing athletes. He discusses both the risks that they face, as well as the benefits they gain. (November 1, 2011)

    • 1 hr 25 min

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

Sbaggett ,

Beautiful

All of the lectures that I watched (1, 5, 6, 10) were very informative, and the speakers were equally effective at conveying the information. However, I do emphasize watching Lecture 6 (Though, I must admit I am massively bised toward the topic).

WORMPIPE1 ,

I HAVE JUST BEEN TOLD I HAVE HEART DISEASE. BUT I HJAVE ALSO BEEN TOLD THAT I AM AT HIGH RISK FOR SD

AS YOU MIGHT HAVE SEEN ON T V ADDS, ASKING FOR PEOPLE TO WORK FOR THE V.A.. I STARTED ASKING FOR HEART TESTING SIX (6) YEARS AGO. WELL TYHE DOCTOR NEVER HAD TAKEN EVEN ONE TEST IN OVER 3 YEARS. I WAS TAKEN BY AMBULANCE FROM MY HOME TO A VERY REPUTABLE HOSPITAL HERE IN BOSTON, MA. THAT HOSPITYAL RAN A BATTERY OF TEST THAT TOOK ONLY ONE DAY. NOW WHY COULD,NT THE V.A.M.C. DOCTOR RUN ANY TTEST AT ALL? I WILL NEVER KNOW. BUT WAITING FOR ANY RESULTS FROM THE V.A. HAS NOW MADE MY CONDITION MUCH WORSE. I HAVE READ AND STUDIED ALL ASPECTS OPF MY HEART. AND THIS HAS TAKEN MUCH TIME AND EFFORT ON MY PART. SO WHY IS THAT DOCTOR STILL WORKING? I DO INTEND TO REPORT HIM TO THE BOARD OF REGISTRY IN MEDICINE SHORTLY. BEFORE HE KILLS SOMEONE. YES, I DO HAVE EVEIDENCE. THANK YOU. I CAN HONESTLY SAY THAT I AM NO LONGER A LAYPERSON. I HAVE LEARNED MORE THAN I CATRE TO MENTION, AGAIN THANK YOU.

Cheko_Sk8r ,

Great lectures

Not only were the lectures very informative but the audio and video quality were great!

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