230 episodes

For The Wild is an Anthology of the Anthropocene; Focused on land based protection, co-liberation and intersectional storytelling rooted in a paradigm shift from human supremacy towards deep ecology.

For The Wil‪d‬ For The Wild

    • Philosophy
    • 4.9 • 710 Ratings

For The Wild is an Anthology of the Anthropocene; Focused on land based protection, co-liberation and intersectional storytelling rooted in a paradigm shift from human supremacy towards deep ecology.

    QUEER NATURE on Reclaiming Wild Safe Space /223 ⌠ENCORE⌡

    QUEER NATURE on Reclaiming Wild Safe Space /223 ⌠ENCORE⌡

    How can queerness guide us as we move through this liminal time period? How can queer ecology radically change our way of knowing? This week’s episode, initially aired in December of 2018, acknowledges that in order to expand ourselves to our fullest capacity, we must bend beyond the cultural and gender binaries that dominant society projects amongst us, to begin this process we need not look further than what has always been. Guided by culturally informed queer ancestral futurist dreams, Pinar and So Sinopoulos-Lloyd of Queer Nature explore how queering our awareness can dismantle the supremacist, ecocidal, and genocidal story we have found ourselves in. Queer Nature is an education and social sculpture project based on Arapaho, Ute, and Cheyenne territories that actively dreams into decolonially-informed queer ‘ancestral futurism’ through mentorship in place-based skills with awareness of post-industrial/globalized/ecocidal contexts. Co-envisioned by Pinar and So Sinopoulos-Lloyd, Queer Nature designs and facilitates nature-based workshops and multi-day immersions intended to be financially, emotionally, and physically accessible to LGBTQ2+ people and QTBIPOCs.

    Music by Y La Bamba and Elisapie.

    Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

    JENNY ODELL on the Attention Economy

    JENNY ODELL on the Attention Economy

    Our attention has operated as currency for the past couple of decades, but with the invasiveness of social media and technology, our ability to exit and enter the attention economy has been severely hindered. As we feel pressure to post and comment on everything for an unknown audience, do we inherently limit our capacity for complexity and vulnerability? And what are the extended ramifications of becoming illiterate in complexity? How does this ripple out into all of our relationships? In lieu of the demanding world buzzing inside our devices, guest Jenny Odell shares the brilliance of doing “nothing”, tending to the ecological self, and growing deeper forms of attention through a commitment to bioregionalism. Jenny Odell is a writer, artist, and enthusiastic birdwatcher based in Oakland, California. She is the author of How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy. Odell teaches digital art at Stanford University.

    Music by Harrison Foster, Bosques Fragmentados, Samara Jade, and Kritzkom.

    Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

    DAVID HOLMGREN on a Quiet Boycott

    DAVID HOLMGREN on a Quiet Boycott

    As so-called powerful “industrial civilizations” continue to decline into dysfunction, unable to care for the vast majority, the call to localize, reinvest in household economies, and strengthen our capacity for self-reliance is becoming emphatic. Amongst failing institutions and the remnants of exploitative wealth, this week’s guest, David Holmgren, encourages us to lean into crisis as a temporary portal that allows us to focus on the potential of all that lies around us. In conversation David explores creative reuse, salvage economies, ethical relationships, permaculture, and the intricacies of mass movements that are trying to override a system that is deeply committed to a machination of consumerism and debt. David Holmgren is the co-originator of the permaculture concept following publication of 'Permaculture One', co-authored with Bill Mollison in 1978. His most recent book, 'RetroSuburbia: The Downshifter’s Guide to a Resilient Future' shows how people can downshift and retrofit their homes, gardens, communities and above all, themselves to be more self-organised, sustainable and resilient into an uncertain future. Music by Roma Ransom and Jody Segar. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

    VIJAY PRASHAD on Capitalism’s Erosion of Morality

    VIJAY PRASHAD on Capitalism’s Erosion of Morality

    Emboldened by the rapid development of technology, a cultural ethos of rugged individualism, globalization, and the monopolization of our media, the era of efficiency in the so-called Global North has significantly altered our communal symbiosis. For many, acts of service that would have once been fulfilled by neighbors and community have now been replaced by apps and gig workers, ultimately commodifying most of our social relations in one form or another. This week on the podcast, we are joined by guest Vijay Prashad to explore how societies take care of themselves, what true public action looks like in crisis, and how movements across the world have resisted the privatization of life and the devaluation of care that we have become accustomed to. Vijay Prashad is the Director of Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research, Chief Editor at LeftWord Books and Chief Correspondent for Globetrotter. His most recent book is Washington Bullets, just out from Monthly Review Press with a preface by Evo Morales Ayma.

    Music by Nathan Keck, Lizabett Russo, Sidi Touré, and Jonathan Yonts.

    Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

    Dr. CUTCHA RISLING BALDY on Land Return and Revitalization

    Dr. CUTCHA RISLING BALDY on Land Return and Revitalization

    In the United States, land ownership is dishonorable no matter how you frame it. For example, 60% of land in the U.S. is owned privately and 30% is owned by the federal government, comparatively tribal nations own about 2.5% of their land. Meanwhile, the Gates family recently became the largest owners of American farmland, owning a total of 260,000 acres of land across 19 states, with 242,000 acres being characterized as “farmland.” In today’s episode, we are joined by guest Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy to explore what land ownership means across the United States, how to begin seeding the concept of land return in mainstream consciousness, and the grave injustices we perpetuate when we continue to draw upon Traditional Ecological Knowledge for climate mitigation and adaptation without working towards land rematration simultaneously. Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy is an Associate Professor and Department Chair of Native American Studies at Humboldt State University. Her research focuses on California Indians, Indigenous feminisms, social & environmental justice, and decolonization. Dr. Risling Baldy is Hupa, Yurok, and Karuk and an enrolled member of the Hoopa Valley Tribe in Northern California. In 2007, she co-founded the Native Women's Collective, a nonprofit organization that supports the continued revitalization of Native American arts and culture.

    Music by Aisha Badru, Holy River, and Theresa Andersson.

    Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

    TOM BUTLER on the Complexities of Large-Scale Conservation

    TOM BUTLER on the Complexities of Large-Scale Conservation

    Currently, less than 15% of terrestrial land exists in some form of protected area, the percentage of marine protected areas is significantly lower. It’s undeniable that protecting some of the last vestiges of wild places from industrial decimation is a critical and worthy cause. However, large-scale land conservation projects have also historically displaced many populations and distressed communities that have relied upon pasture and forest for their livelihoods because of previous colonial impositions. In this episode, we explore the complex world of large-scale land conservation and wildlife restoration through the work of Tompkins Conservation with guest Tom Butler. A writer and conservation activist, Tom Butler is author, volume editor, or co-editor of more than a dozen books including Wildlands Philanthropy, Plundering Appalachia, and Overdevelopment, Overpopulation, Overshoot, and ENERGY: Overdevelopment and the Delusion of Endless Growth.

    Music by Jeffrey Silverstein and Galen Hefferman.

    Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
710 Ratings

710 Ratings

ALMoon2020 ,

Very well spoken and easy listening

I recommend this podcast for anyone who like listen to something interesting and that well spoken. Also very diverse and cultural. A great way to travel the world without leaving home.
All the questions are inquisitive and thought out while being kindly ask without interrupting the interviewees.
All the interviewees and informative stories they tell are very passionate and inspiring. Thank you for the podcast. Highly recommended!

pendejaaa ,

THIS!

If nothing else, THIS!

faithrine ,

Beautiful podcast

It’s deeply beautiful and affirming to listen to these conversations. I love the music breaks, it allows me to take time to reflect on the discussion. I am so grateful to have found this podcast.

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