487 episodes

A former sommelier interviews incredibly famous and knowledgeable wine personalities in his tiny apartment. He gets them to talk candidly about their lives and work, and then shares the conversations with you. To see new episodes sooner and to see all of the hundreds of back episodes in your feed, it is important to FOLLOW or SUBSCRIBE the show. It is free to do either, the show is free.

Contact info-

Email leviopenswine@gmail.com

Instagram @leviopenswine

Twitter @drinktothatpod

Website illdrinktothatpod.com

I'll Drink to That! Wine Tal‪k‬ Levi Dalton

    • Food
    • 4.8 • 915 Ratings

A former sommelier interviews incredibly famous and knowledgeable wine personalities in his tiny apartment. He gets them to talk candidly about their lives and work, and then shares the conversations with you. To see new episodes sooner and to see all of the hundreds of back episodes in your feed, it is important to FOLLOW or SUBSCRIBE the show. It is free to do either, the show is free.

Contact info-

Email leviopenswine@gmail.com

Instagram @leviopenswine

Twitter @drinktothatpod

Website illdrinktothatpod.com

    IDTT Wine 486: George Skouras and the New Old World

    IDTT Wine 486: George Skouras and the New Old World

    George Skouras is the owner and winemaker at Domaine Skouras, located in the Peloponnese of Greece.

    • 1 hr 12 min
    IDTT Wine 485: Robert Vifian and Stories from the Tan Dinh Wine Cellar

    IDTT Wine 485: Robert Vifian and Stories from the Tan Dinh Wine Cellar

    Robert Vifian is the chef and co-owner of Tan Dinh Restaurant, located in Paris, France.




    Robert was born in Vietnam in 1948, and lived in Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City) as a child, experiencing the effects of the Tet Offensive firsthand. He and his family are French, and he moved to Paris, eventually joining his parents there. Robert's mother founded Tan Dinh Restaurant in 1968, and later Robert joined her in the kitchen there. Robert then took over as Chef of that restaurant in 1978. As the 1970s moved in the 1980s, the restaurant became popular with artists, actors, and other cultural types, and became both a chic spot to dine and a destination for wine aficionados.




    Robert became interested in both cuisine and wine, and was soon searching out rare bottles, organizing private tastings, teaching in a wine school, and visiting cellars in Burgundy and Bordeaux. He visited producers such as Domaine Coche-Dury each year for many years, and developed a lot of familiarity with the wines of Domaine Comtes Lafon, Domaine Georges Roumier, and Domaine Hubert Lignier, tasting every vintage of each for several decades. He shares his reflections and thoughts about this producers in the interview. He also discusses Henri Jayer and Anne-Claude Leflaive, and their wines.




    Robert also developed a lot of familiarity with Right Bank Bordeaux, specifically Pomerol. And Robert had close friendships with oenologists like Jean-Claude Berrouet and Michel Rolland, as well as wine critics like Robert Parker, Jr., and those friendships lended support to his experiences of Bordeaux. He recalls those relationships in the interview, and shares his views on each person. He also discusses aspects of what he learned about Pomerol over the years.




    Robert had a friendship and a working relationship with the late Steven Spurrier during the time that Spurrier lived in Paris. Robert recalls the friendship and his different experiences with Spurrier in this interview. He also discusses the California wines that he learned about as a result of his acquaintance with Spurrier, dating back to The Judgement of Paris tasting in 1976.




    This interview follows the Paris wine scene from the 1970s until the present, and encompasses thoughts on both benchmark wine regions of France and key producers from those places, across the same decades.




    This episode also features commentary from:




    Steven Spurrier, formerly a Consulting Editor for "Decanter" Magazine

    Becky Wasserman-Hone, Becky Wasserman & Co.

    Christian Moueix, Etablissements Jean-Pierre Moueix

    • 1 hr 16 min
    IDTT Wine 484: Erin Scala Looks Deep Into Lake Garda

    IDTT Wine 484: Erin Scala Looks Deep Into Lake Garda

    Erin Scala explores the long history and many recent changes in the area around Lake Garda and in the Bardolino wine zone, in the northeastern Italy.




    Erin speaks with a number of different winemakers and specialists to clarify the situation around the evolution of winemaking in the Bardolino zone, from Roman times to the present day. She addresses the shift in the area in recent years towards rosé production, and explores both why this has occurred as well as the historical precedents for it. She enunciates how the wineries in the area vary in their choice of technique, and describes the different styles of the resulting wines. Erin examines both the shifting cultural and climatic settings for the wine production of this area. She explains how this Lake area - now well within Italy - was once at the border with Austria, as well as the recent effects of climate change there. She discusses the typical foods of the place, as well as the microclimate created by its defining feature: the lake. Erin also looks ahead to what wine styles may become more prevalent in the zone in the future.




    If you have not kept up with the rapid changes for wine within the Bardolino zone in recent years, this episode is a complete and crucial overview of the situation on the ground.




    This episode features commentary from:




    Gabriele Rausse, Gabrielle Rausse Winery

    Luca Valetti, Cantina Valetti

    Roberta Bricolo, Gorgo

    Francesco Piona, Cavalchina

    Marco Ruffato, Le Ginestra

    Matilde Poggi, Le Fraghe

    Daniele Domenico Delaini, Villa Calicantus

    Andreas Berger, Weingut Thurnhof

    Fabio Zenato, Le Morette

    Franco Christoforetti, Villa Bella

    Giulio Cosentino, Albino Piona

    Angelo Peretti, author of the book "Il Bardolino"

    Katherine Cole, journalist and author of the book "Rosé All Day: The Essential Guide to Your New Favorite Wine"




    Special Thanks To:




    Irene Graziotto

    • 48 min
    IDTT Wine 483: Listen to Françoise Vannier and Never Look At Burgundy the Same Way Again

    IDTT Wine 483: Listen to Françoise Vannier and Never Look At Burgundy the Same Way Again

    Françoise Vannier is a geologist who has studied and mapped the vineyards of Burgundy for multiple decades. She is based in France.




    Françoise discusses how she began her study of the vineyards of the Côte d'Or, and the surprising results that emerged from her research. She touches on both broad themes and specific, individual instances in her analysis of the rock types and rock weathering in the Côte. For example, she explains how the Côte de Nuits differs from the Côte de Beaune in broad terms, and then gives examples from specific vineyards and villages that illustrate those divergences. She emphasizes the importance of the both the parallel and vertical faults that exist in the Cote d'Or, and explains how the vertical faults are often where combes have developed, which are breaks in the slope (like valleys). Françoise highlights the importance of these combes to understanding the rock distribution of the Côte d'Or. This then plays into her contention that village names are not as helpful as one might think for understanding the vineyards of the area, as it is the combes that are the actual markers of where the rock distribution changes in the Côte d'Or.




    Françoise also emphasizes the difficulty and complexity of the topic of Côte d'Or geology, enunciating a number of nuances to the different rock types, and how they weather. She also points out that multiple rock types may be found within a single vineyard, as faults do not fall only at the borders of vineyards. Furthermore, the rock types do not nicely match up with the hierarchy of perceived quality of the vineyards, as the same type of rock may be found under both a villages vineyard and a Grand Cru. These realizations prompted Françoise to examine the historical, cultural, or climatic reasons why certain vineyards are in more esteem than others today, and she shares in this interview her thoughts on those subjects.




    Françoise speaks about numerous areas of the Côte d'Or in some depth, including areas within the boundaries of Marsannay, Gevrey-Chambertin, Morey-Saint-Denis, Chambolle-Musigny, Pommard, and Meursault. She dispels common myths about the topic of Burgundy geology, and she gives examples of specific crus to illustrate many of her points. She also provides an examination of how human activity, in the form of quarries, house building, and clos (walled vineyard) construction has altered the Côte d'Or. Lastly, Françoise describes how the Côte d'Or differs from other areas of France which also feature calcium carbonate deposits, such as Champagne and St. Émilion.




    Anyone who wishes to understand Burgundy better will benefit from listening to this episode multiple times.




    This episode also features commentary from:




    Brenna Quigley, geologist and vineyard consultant

    Christophe Roumier, Domaine Georges Roumier

    • 1 hr 40 min
    IDTT Wine 482: Lorenzo Accomasso and Barolo from the War Until Now

    IDTT Wine 482: Lorenzo Accomasso and Barolo from the War Until Now

    Lorenzo Accomasso is a vintner in the La Morra area of Italy's Piemonte region. He has been releasing Barolo and other wines under the Accomasso label for several decades.




    Lorenzo discusses the increased interest in Barolo and in the wines of the Piemonte that has occurred over the last couple of decades, as well as the increased planting of vineyards in La Morra. Lorenzo talks about helping his parents at the winery in the post-World War II years. He contrasts the current situation for the wines with the period of the 1960s, when people were leaving the countryside to find jobs in factories. He also recalls the difficult growing conditions of the 1970s, and the changes in attitude towards topics like green harvesting and fruit sorting that have occurred over time.




    Lorenzo is clear about his winemaking stance as a Traditional producer, and touches on some of the techniques that separate his winemaking from those who operate in a Modern style. He talks about the changes in popularity for Modern and Traditional wines from the Piemonte, and how those categories have been perceived in the market over time. He also touches on the difficulty of changing one's winemaking style once it has been set. Vineyard work is discussed, and Lorenzo makes a distinction between his different Barolo vineyards (Rocche, Rocchette, and Le Mie Vigne). He contrasts the different attributes of those vineyard sites.




    Vintage evaluations are given for many years, stretching back to the 1970s. Lorenzo gives his frank opinions of many vintages, and at times gives his thoughts on ageability as well. Then he discusses some of the difficulties he has experienced when making wines from the Dolcetto grape variety, in contrast to Nebbiolo.




    This is a rare opportunity to hear from a Piemonte vintner who lived through World War II, and with that in mind, this episode begins with a history of Italy and of the Piemonte in the later years of that war and after. That was a time when fighting between Fascists and Partisans took a huge human toll, with many deaths. The capsule history then transitions into a discussion of the changes the Piemonte experienced in the second half of the 20th century, as emigration and industrialization changed the environment for wine production. Italian cultural commentators Mario Soldati and Luigi Veronelli are also talked about, as are the changes in winemaking that increasingly began to take hold in the late 1970s and into the 2000s. Those changes gave rise to different winemaking camps in the Piemonte, which are discussed. Eventually the market for the Piemonte wines begins to change, and at the same time there arrives a belated realization that climate change has altered the realities for vine growing in the Piemonte.




    This episode also features commentary from:




    Martina Barosio, formerly of Scarpa

    Nicoletta Bocca, San Fereolo

    Beppe Colla (translated by Federica Colla), the ex-owner of Prunotto

    Luca Currado, Vietti

    Umberto Fracassi Ratti Mentone, Umberto Fracassi

    Angelo Gaja, Gaja

    Gaia Gaja, Gaja

    Maria Teresa Mascarello, Cantina Bartolo Mascarello

    Danilo Nada, Nada Fiorenzo

    Giacomo Oddero (translated by Isabella Oddero), Poderi Oddero

    Federico Scarzello, Scarzello

    Aldo Vaira (translated by Giuseppe Vaira), G.D. Vajra

    Aldo Vacca, Produttori del Barbaresco

    Michael Garner, co-author of Barolo: Tar and Roses

    Victor Hazan, author of Italian Wine




    Thank You to...

    Robert Lateiner and Gregory Dal Piaz for the use of the recording of Lorenzo Accomasso

    Carlotta Rinaldi and Giuseppe Vaira for their translation work

    Chris Thile for voiceover

    Bodhisattwa for the whistling of "Bella Ciao"

    • 1 hr 33 min
    IDTT Wine 481: Wine Before and After the Genocide

    IDTT Wine 481: Wine Before and After the Genocide

    Zorik Gharibian is the founder of the Zorah winery, in the Vayots Dzor region of southern Armenia.

    Zorik discusses the long history of wine production in Armenia, referencing evidence that wine was made in Armenia in the Copper Age (about 6,000 years ago). He talks about the grape remnants and clay storage jars that have been found from that time. And he discusses other wine related finds in Armenia, in both the pre-Christian era and later. Zorik then explains why a hundred year gap occured in the dry wine production of Armenia, and he talks about the situation for wine as he found it in Armenia in the late 1990s.

    Zorik explains his rationale for beginning his own winery in Armenia, and talks about the different winemaking regions of Armenia. He gives special emphasis to the area that he chose to base his production in, Vayots Dzor. He talks about the native grape family of that region, which is known as Areni, and his experiences with planting a new Areni vineyard. That is contrasted with his comments about a much older vineyard of Areni, which he also works with. Both vineyards are own-rooted, as phylloxera is not present in the region.

    Zorik also talks about the amphora clay containers that housed wine in Armenia in ancient times, and which he uses today as well. He gives his explanation for why he chose to mature his Areni wine in amphora - known as Karas in Armenia - as opposed to wooden barriques. And he relates details about his search to find amphora that were already existing in Armenia and which he could use, as well as to develop production of new amphora there today. He further gives a summary of the drinking habits of his surrounding region in Armenia, and an outlook on what it is like working in Armenia today.

    This episode also features commentary from:

    Katherine Moore, Union Square Wines

    Lee Campbell, Early Mountain Vineyards

    Conrad Reddick, Monterey Plaza Hotel and Spa

    • 56 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
915 Ratings

915 Ratings

HenkelPartyof6 ,

Excellent podcast

As a winemaker and wine lover I am thankful for that Levi makes this show. Every guest is different from the last, and his interviews are both informative and soulful.

meredithhu ,

Best of its kind

Spent a lot of time re listening to and taking notes on these podcasts esp those with vintners/authors with the extra time from the pandemic. Some episodes are just so precious (eg with those that had sadly passed away), informative, and inspirational that I haven’t found any other podcast/forum/anything that could hold a candle to. Thanks so much and keep going!

Pod Love ,

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