31 episodes

Welcome to all English language learners and teachers to languagecaster.com and its free football podcast. Every week a new soccer show complete with language support for students who wish to improve their English language skills.

Learn English Through Football languagecaster.com

    • Education

Welcome to all English language learners and teachers to languagecaster.com and its free football podcast. Every week a new soccer show complete with language support for students who wish to improve their English language skills.

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2021 Copa Libertadores Final Palmeiras vs Flamengo

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2021 Copa Libertadores Final Palmeiras vs Flamengo

    In this football language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game, we look at some words and phrases from the final of the 2021 Copa Libertadores between Palmeiras and Flamengo. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2021 Copa Libertadores Final Palmeiras vs Flamengo

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    DF: Hello again everyone, this is Damian from the Languagecaster.com team and we hope you are all well. Now, on this extra football language podcast we feature some of the language used to describe the 2021 Copa Libertadores Final between two Brazilian sides Palmeiras and Flamengo which took place in the Estadio Monumental in Montevideo, the capital of Uruguay this weekend. And so to do this, we use reports on the game from The Guardian (here in the UK) (November 27 2021) and from the BBC.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Greek).

    See off/After Extra Time/Retain the title

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    This is how the Associated Press reported on the final in their headline. The first verb is ‘to see off‘ which is another way of saying to defeat a team; so to see off someone or something is to overcome or beat an opponent; so in this example, Palmeiras defeated Flamengo in the final. The headline goes on to add information about this victory – it happened in extra time after the two sides drew 1-1 after 90 minutes and also the phrase ‘retain the title‘ which means to win the title for the second year running – Palmeiras defeated Santos in the 2020 final.

    Pounce on an error/Slot the winner

    • 3 min
    Head Off The Line – Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2021 Champions League Man City vs PSG

    Head Off The Line – Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2021 Champions League Man City vs PSG

    In this football language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game, we look at some of the words and phrases from the Champions League group game between Manchester City and Paris Saint Germain and we use a report from the Guardian newspaper to do this. You can read a transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

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    Head off the line – Learning English Through Football Podcast: 2021 Champions League Man City vs PSG

    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Languagecaster.com team here in a rather cold London – we might even have snow this weekend! I hope you are all doing well and that you enjoyed the football this week. The fifth set of fixtures in the Champions League took place and there were some big results, including AC Milan winning away at Atlético Madrid, former West Ham striker Sébastien Haller scoring his ninth Champions League goal of the season as Ajax won their fifth straight game; something that Liverpool also did after defeating Porto 2-0 – no doubt Damon will be happy with that result. He of course is in Tokyo – I wonder did he get up in the middle of the night to watch the game live?

    OK, on this podcast we take a look at another one of the big games from the Champions League, perhaps the biggest in fact, as beaten finalists Manchester City took on Paris Saint Germain to see which side would top the group. We use a Guardian newspaper match report to help us look at some of the language used to describe the win for the Manchester side.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Thai).

    Head off the line & Goal line clearance

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    Manchester City started the game well and created some early chances and in this description, the reporter describes how their winger Riyad Mahrez tried to curl or bend the ball around the PSG goalkeeper Navas. He did this by cutting inside a defe...

    • 7 min
    Interim Manager: Learning English Through Football

    Interim Manager: Learning English Through Football

    In this short football language podcast we take a look at the phrase ‘interim manager‘ which has been in the news this weekend due to Ole Gunnar Solskjær’s departure from Manchester United. There is a transcript with this listening activity along with some vocabulary practice and you can also check out our football glossary and football cliches pages for hundreds more explanations of the language of soccer. If you have questions or comments about this or any other phrase then email us at: admin@languagecaster.com.

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: Interim Manager

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    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Learning English Through Football team. I hope we are all doing well and that we have enjoyed the football this week. Now, the big story here in the UK this weekend is Ole Gunnar Solskjær’s departure from Manchester United after five defeats in the past seven games and a general poor level of performance over the season. The club sacked Solskjær and are now looking for a new manager so they have appointed an interim manager in the meantime while they continue this search. And so this phrase ‘interim manager‘ will be the focus of this short podcast.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Swahili).

    Don’t forget we also have a transcript to go with this podcast, while if you have any questions or comments about any of the football language in this report then you can contact us at: admin@languagecaster.com or ask a question on our football language forum.

    Interim Manager

    With the sacking of Ole Gunnar Solskjær over the weekend, Manchester United are looking for a new manager. However, as they don’t have anyone lined up (or ready) to take over they have decided that former assistant manager Michael Carrick will oversee the team – so, hell be in charge, while they search for an interim manager who will look after the club until the end of the season. So an interim boss is a manager who will look after the club until a new permanent manager has been chosen. The word ‘interim‘ is connected to time and generally means the time between one action and another; so it is something temporary. An interim manager, therefore, is not expected to be in charge for a long time but maybe only a few m...

    • 4 min
    Learn English Through Football Podcast: World Cup 2022 – European Qualifiers

    Learn English Through Football Podcast: World Cup 2022 – European Qualifiers

    In this football language post we look back at some of the language that was used to describe some of the drama in the European qualification matches for the 2022 World Cup. We will focus on some of the newspaper headlines from these matches and look at phrases such as ‘leapfrog‘; ‘to confirm‘; ‘to secure‘ and ‘demolition‘. There is a transcript with this listening activity along with some vocabulary practice and you can also check out our football glossary and football cliches pages for hundreds more explanations of the language of soccer. If you have questions or comments about this or any other phrase then email us at: admin@languagecaster.com.

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: World Cup 2022 – European Qualifiers

    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Learning English Through Football team. I hope we are all doing well and enjoying the football. Did you watch any of the recent World Cup qualifiers? How did your side do? Well, my country Ireland were already eliminated from the tournament – they could not qualify for the finals next year – but it was still nice to see them pick up four points and two clean sheets in matches against Luxembourg and Portugal – more on them later!

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (Irish fan).

    OK, so the latest set of World Cup qualifying games is over and what an action-packed set of fixtures it has proved to be, particularly in the European section where the final group matches have now all been completed. The ten group winners have been decided but to find out the remaining three sides who will play in the 2022 finals, we will have to wait until next March when a series of play-offs take place. Now, the play-off route will be a tricky one – teams will have to win a semi-final and a final in one-off games which meant that finishing second in their qualifying groups would not be ideal.

    So in this football language podcast we take a look at how newspaper headlines have described some of these final group matches that decided which teams would qualify for Qatar 2022, which ones would go into the play-offs and which ones would be eliminated.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (French fan).

    Now, don’t forget there is of course a transcript to go with this podcast – it’s great for teaching and learning English – and if you have any questions or comments about any of the football language in this report then you can contact us  at: admin@languagecaster.com or ask a question on our a href="https://languagecaster.

    • 9 min
    Acres of Space – Football Language Podcast: Season 2021-22

    Acres of Space – Football Language Podcast: Season 2021-22

    This football language podcast focuses on the phrase acres of space, which is used to talk about a player’s position. The transcript for this podcast is available below, and you can also access our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions please contact us at admin@languagecaster.com or leave a question or comment on our forum. (DB=Damon)

    Acres of Space – Football Language Podcast: Season 2021-22

    DB: You’re listening to languagecaster.com’s football language podcast. Hello there. Thanks for dropping by. My name’s Damon, one half of the langaugecaster team. The other half is Damian, who is across the world from me in London. I, meanwhile, am in a beautiful, autumnal Tokyo. This podcast series and our site is a great place to come if you want to improve your English while also talking about the beautiful game of football.

    On today’s short football language podcast, we’ll take a look at the phrase ‘acres of space‘ and some other phrases connected to it. Before we do that, if you like what we do here at languagecaster, please show us by leaving comments, sharing our podcasts and posts, and maybe also by leaving a donation to help keep us up and running.

    ** Click below to donate to languagecaster.com and keep the football language coming! **



    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Portuguese).

    Acres of Space

    DB: Yes, you are listening to languagecaster.com and that message was in Portuguese – thank you Akiko!

    OK, to be in acres of space. Let’s take a look at this phrase. First of all, we have acre, which is a measure of area, like hectare or square metres. An acre is roughly the size of two football pitches – actually 1.75 football pitches, but two is easy to remember.

    It is an Old English word and has been largely replaced by metric measures like metres and hectares. But football, with its roots in British history, still uses a lot of old measurements: for example, the six-yard area; the penalty spot is 12 yards from the goal-line etc.

    Back to the phrase, if you say a player is in acres of space, you mean there is no opponent near them. They are standing in a lot of space – acres of space.

    Here’s an example from Marca:

    Manchester United shifted the ball from left to right and that meant Bruno Fernandes had acres of space on the right-hand side of the box, but he fired his shot high and wide of Alisson’s goal.

    Here the verb is have, or had: Fernandes had acres of space.

    The Freedom of the Park

    Another way to say a player has a lot of space, or too much space if you are the defending team, is to say they have the freedom of the park. When you use this phrase or acres of space, you are criticising the defending team for not being tight enough, close enough, to the player with the ball.

    Here’s an example from a game last year between Leicester and Liverpool on 90mins.in:

    With Leicester more or less camped inside their own third, the 21-year-old had the freedom of the park, firing characteristically inviting crosses into the box.

    The opposing team can also ‘give’ a playe...

    • 5 min
    Learning English Through Football Podcast: Ronaldo’s Late Goals

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: Ronaldo’s Late Goals

    In this football language post we look at some of the language used to describe some of Ronaldo’s recent late goals for Manchester United in the Champions League. We’ll be looking at many phrases including, ‘trademark header‘; ‘volleyed in‘; ‘breathless‘ and ‘bundle home‘. There is a transcript with this listening activity along with some vocabulary practice and you can also check out our football glossary and football cliches pages for hundreds more explanations of the language of soccer. If you have questions or comments about this or any other phrase then email us at: admin@languagecaster.com.

    Learning English Through Football Podcast: Ronaldo’s Late Goals

    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Learning English Through Football team. I hope we are all doing well and enjoying the football. How did your favourite team get on this week? Did you watch any of the European matches that took place this week? Congratulations on the four teams who qualified for the Champions League knock-out stages: Ajax, Bayern Munich, Juventus and Liverpool – no doubt Damon will be happy! My team Tottenham are involved in the Europa Conference League – that’s the third tier of European football – and we defeated Dutch side Vitesse 3-2 in a rollercoaster of a game – so it’s going up and down. Some moments it was great; others it wasn’t so good. But of course that wasn’t the big news coming out of Tottenham this week because we now have a new manager as former Inter and Chelsea boss Antonio Conte has joined the club after Nuno was fired or sacked last weekend. A week in football is a long time indeed.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (Dutch fan).

    Now, one of the big games in Europe this week was the Champions League qualifier between Atalanta and Manchester United which ended in a 2-2 draw thanks to Man United’s Cristiano Ronaldo who scored an equaliser in the 91st minute. And as this was not the first time the Portuguese superstar has done this in the Champions League this season we thought we’d look at how some of the UK press described some of these late Ronaldo goals.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (Spanish fan).

    Now, don’t forget there is of course a transcript to go with this podcast – it’s great for teaching and learning English – and if you have any questions or comments about any of the football language in this report then you can contact us here at: admin@languagecaster.com. OK, let’s look at some of the language used to describe these late goals from Cristiano Ronaldo.

    • 8 min

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