22 episodes

The American Chemical Society (ACS) gives more than 60 national awards to honor accomplishments in chemistry and service to chemistry. Prized Science strives to give people who may have no special scientific knowledge, the opportunity to watch, listen, and discover how the chemistry behind ACS’ awards transforms life for the better.

Prized Science American Chemical Society

    • Science
    • 1.0 • 2 Ratings

The American Chemical Society (ACS) gives more than 60 national awards to honor accomplishments in chemistry and service to chemistry. Prized Science strives to give people who may have no special scientific knowledge, the opportunity to watch, listen, and discover how the chemistry behind ACS’ awards transforms life for the better.

    • video
    Prized Science 2014: Ep. 2 “Making the world's most dreaded undergrad course fun"

    Prized Science 2014: Ep. 2 “Making the world's most dreaded undergrad course fun"

    Organic chemistry: It’s among the most feared courses undergraduate science students take. Whether you call it “orgo” or “o-chem,” it has reduced many hopeful scholars to tears. One professor thinks he has a solution. William Dichtel, Ph.D., of Cornell University shares his thoughts on making organic chemistry classes more interesting and relevant to students.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Prized Science 2014: Ep. 1 “Stephen J. Lippard - Winner of the 2014 Priestley Medal"

    Prized Science 2014: Ep. 1 “Stephen J. Lippard - Winner of the 2014 Priestley Medal"

    Stephen J. Lippard is the winner of the 2014 American Chemical Society Priestley Medal, the highest honor given by ACS. Lippard helped create the field of bioinorganic chemistry, which explores the crucial role of metals in biology. His work also led to a better understanding of the mechanism of cisplatin — sometimes termed "the penicillin of cancer" for its wide-ranging effects — and opened the door to efforts to develop more effective anti-cancer medications.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Prized Science 2013: Episode 6 "Esther S. Takeuchi: Building life-saving batteries"

    Prized Science 2013: Episode 6 "Esther S. Takeuchi: Building life-saving batteries"

    The engineering feat that enables a device to jolt a dangerously misbehaving heart back to its normal rhythm and save millions of lives is featured in our last Prized Science episode of 2013. The video features renowned inventor Esther S. Takeuchi, Ph.D., this year's winner of the E. V. Murphree Award in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry. The award recognizes Takeuchi's work on a battery that powers implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs). These devices monitor patients' heartbeats continuously. When the beats go haywire, it can deliver a life-saving shock to help the heart resume a normal rhythm.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Prized Science 2013: Episode 5 "Isiah Warner: New Orleans Nanotech - "GUMBOS" promise new drugs and electronics"

    Prized Science 2013: Episode 5 "Isiah Warner: New Orleans Nanotech - "GUMBOS" promise new drugs and electronics"

    A group of nanoparticles called “GUMBOS” is as varied as their culinary namesake implies, with a wide range of potential applications from cancer therapy tosensors. Isiah Warner, Ph.D., won the ACS Award in Analytical Chemistry for his work on GUMBOS and other innovative research.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Prized Science 2013: Episode 4 "Shirley O. Corriher: Chemistry and Cooking"

    Prized Science 2013: Episode 4 "Shirley O. Corriher: Chemistry and Cooking"

    One of Shirley O. Corriher’s first lessons on how chemistry meets cooking came in the form of scrambled eggs stuck to a frying pan. That experience set the former biochemist on a journey to become an award-winning food writer. For her success in bringing science in the home, Corriher was awarded this year's James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Prized Science 2013: Episode 3 "Greg Robinson: Chemical Detectives - Preparing New Matter in the Universe"

    Prized Science 2013: Episode 3 "Greg Robinson: Chemical Detectives - Preparing New Matter in the Universe"

    Imagine creating something completely new — something improbable and provocative that has never existed on Earth before. This kind of unconventional science is the focus of Gregory H. Robinson, Ph.D., winner of the 2013 F. Albert Cotton Award in Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry. The Cotton Award recognizes Robinson’s success harnessing finicky, unstable elements.

    • 4 min

Customer Reviews

1.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

rjkenney ,

Won

Haven't watched this yet but probably won't since it will not sync with my Touch w/ version 4.1 software. I guess it is fine on the iPhone but why limit it?

liprobinson ,

Good idea, terrible execution

I was excited that ACS was trying to connect science to our everyday lives.
However, they've done a terrible job with this first effort. The concepts are poorly explained, and at an extremely superficial level. The graphics are juvenile. Richard Zare is a great scientist, but does not communicate well in this video; he frequently sounds confused or uncertain. There are factual errors (e.g. stating that there are 3 million base pairs in the human genome -- should be 3 billion). The narration is repetitive, and doesn't provide meaningful support about how these new technologies really impact our lives. As a member of ACS, I'm embarrassed.