96 episodes

Welcome to the HRCI Work | Life Podcast bringing news, stories, and interviews from the Human Resources realm straight to you – presented by HRCI studios in Alexandria, Virginia.

HRCI Work | Life Podcas‪t‬ HR Certification Institute Marketing Team

    • Management
    • 4.1 • 9 Ratings

Welcome to the HRCI Work | Life Podcast bringing news, stories, and interviews from the Human Resources realm straight to you – presented by HRCI studios in Alexandria, Virginia.

    Trends in Employee Safety Training

    Trends in Employee Safety Training

    This is your HR news flash, your briefing on talent management and the world of work from HRCI.
    The pandemic has accelerated employer needs to rethink employee safety training. Here are a few ways to leverage recent trends to educate and protect your workforce:
    First, thinking beyond compliance. Compliance should not be your only goal. In addition to legal requirements, training is an essential means to incorporate meaningful modules to continuously increase proficiencies, improve well-being, and create a resilient and adaptable workforce.
    Second, address concerns. Incorporate current concerns into training modules. For instance, apply best practices in employee safety training for issues such as mental health, cybersecurity and inclement weather.
    Third, leverage digital learning tools. Optimize safety training for digital delivery. Provide mobile friendly training courses using a variety of resources that can easily be accessed by your employees.
    This concludes your HR News Flash. HRCI prepares HR leaders for the digital age. Thanks for listening. Check back soon for the workplace news you need. Learn more at HRCI.org.

    • 1 min
    Creating Fair Compensation Plans

    Creating Fair Compensation Plans

    This is your HR news flash, your briefing on talent management and the world of work from HRCI.
    A properly incentivized compensation plan can affect your business. Taking on new clients contributes to your organization’s business success. To optimize your entire sales function, you must motivate your team through fair and realistic financial incentives. Having an effective sales compensation plan that pays employees well for meeting expectations is essential.
    Here are some components of a successful compensation plan, according to Scot Sorenson, senior advisor of Strategic Sales Results:
    First, find the win-win Tie variable compensation to individual performance, as well as to department or organization performance. 
    Second, incentivize behaviors Focus on big-picture goals and encourage your sales team to leverage strategy to align your compensation plan in lockstep with your company goals.
    Third, award top performance Ensure that awards are easy to understand and motivates the team to excel through commissions. 
    This concludes your HR News Flash. HRCI prepares HR leaders for the digital age. Thanks for listening. Check back soon for the workplace news you need. Learn more at HRCI.org.

    • 1 min
    Designing a Performance Management System for Today's Challenges

    Designing a Performance Management System for Today's Challenges

    This is your HR news flash, your briefing on talent management and the world of work from HRCI.
    Distributed workforces and economic uncertainty make it challenging for your employees to feel connected and engaged. Successful performance management in this kind of environment requires agile processes and tools.
    Here is how to standardize your performance management processes to meet today’s challenges at your organization.
    First, define specific needs Designing a system for managing performance at your organization requires evaluating your needs and resources. Now more than ever, revisit these evaluations frequently to maintain agility in your performance management processes.
    Second, provide regular feedback Creating a performance management system requires consistent check-ins. Following a continuous feedback model leads to increased productivity, improved performance and higher engagement. 
    Lastly, utilize performance management software Use technology to help managers document goals and record feedback. HR can use this information to collect and analyze workforce data. Choosing user-friendly performance management systems can increase compliance and frequent communication between managers and their teams, whether they are on-site or remote.

    • 2 min
    Setting a New Standard for Ethics in Human Resources

    Setting a New Standard for Ethics in Human Resources

    This is your HR news flash, your briefing on talent management and the world of work from HRCI.
    A code of ethics is an essential aspect of every organization. Not only is this good business practice, it fosters employee retention and customer loyalty. When your mission supports ethical behaviors, your HR leaders can build an ethical workplace at all levels.  
    First, start with ethical leadership.
    Leaders must model ethical motivations and behaviors. Employees should be encouraged to   use ethical practices in their decision-making process. Having a well-written code of ethics is a good starting point.
    Second, integrate ethical training across the organization.
    Aligning ethical principles with employee behavior requires regular training. Continuous learning, or microlearning, is essential to create a sense of ongoing responsibility. 
    Third, address ethics concerns.
    HR leaders must address ethics concerns regardless of the source. Work with department heads and direct managers to look for warning signs. When violations occur, address them, educate the workforce on why they were a problem, and move forward with integrity.

    • 1 min
    Do You Need a Degree to Work in HR?

    Do You Need a Degree to Work in HR?

    This is your HR news flash, your briefing on talent management and the world of work from HRCI.
    Worldwide, companies are adapting to new ways of working. Employers need HR practitioners who can support business continuity while guiding their workforces through change. Should you have an HR degree to enter the field?
    Here is how to make an impression on hiring managers, with or without a degree.
    First, focus on real-world application.
    You can gain valuable HR experience from an entry-level job or internship that requires only a high school diploma or equivalent. Some suggestions by the Bureau of Labor Statistics include working as a financial clerk, an information clerk, or finding an entry-level recruiting position. 
    On-the-job experience is also a valid learning method. Individuals who hold HR degrees still require experience to practice their learning. 
    Second, broaden sources of knowledge.
    Learning about topics beyond HR is essential. Employers look for detail-oriented candidates with important traits such as decision-making, interpersonal and communication skills. Additionally, sharpening your critical-thinking skills can help you learn to assess situations and adapt quickly. 
    Finally, make your case for being a good hire.
    A good first step is to apply and pass a certification exam. The Associate Professional in Human Resources® can help you demonstrate mastery of the fundamentals of HR and make your resume stand out. 
    Next, develop a portfolio of your experiences at an entry-level job or internship. Include continuous learning on your own time, as well as any certifications you have earned. This will help secure and continue to grow your HR career.
    This concludes your HR News Flash. HRCI prepares HR leaders for the digital age. Thanks for listening. Check back soon for the workplace news you need. Learn more at HRCI.org.

    • 2 min
    Combating Microaggressions in the Workplace

    Combating Microaggressions in the Workplace

    This is your HR news flash, your briefing on talent management and the world of work from HRCI.
    Microaggressions can occur through our unconscious actions and behaviors. These behaviors in the workplace can leave employees feeling demoralized, isolated and humiliated.
    Without active steps to prevent microaggressions, they can have a toxic effect on your organization’s culture. Recently, Melissa Dobbins, founder and CEO of career.place, joined HRCI’s Alchemizing HR webinar series, to address how to break the culture of microaggressions at your workplace. Here are a few suggestions.
    First, promote actionable awareness.
    Most microaggressions are unintentional and are the result of lack of awareness or exposure to diverse experiences. Combatting microaggressions requires increased awareness accompanied by meaningful action.
    Melissa provided a three-question model for addressing a microaggression after it occurs:
    First, ask what did you find exclusionary and/or hurtful? Second, ask why this practice was exclusionary and/or hurtful? Finally, ask what behavior must change, and how? Second, facilitate respectful dialogue.
    As you begin addressing microaggressions, lay out ground rules. Hold everyone to the same standards, and require that everyone speak to each other with respect. Do not allow name-calling or “us versus them” language. Letting people blame others will only exacerbate division and conflict.
    Finally, reinforce consistent consequences.
    Make sure that you acknowledge professional behavior and address any deviations from standards or rules.
    The key to preventing microaggressions is consistency, thereby creating a workplace that is fair, equitable and safe for all.

    • 2 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Management

Listeners Also Subscribed To