377 episódios

Named after Charles Babbage, a 19th-century polymath and grandfather of computing, Babbage is a weekly podcast on science and technology. Host Alok Jha talks to our correspondents about the innovations, discoveries and gadgetry making the news. Published every Tuesday by Economist Podcasts.
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Babbage from The Economist The Economist

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    • 4,6 • 14 classificações

Named after Charles Babbage, a 19th-century polymath and grandfather of computing, Babbage is a weekly podcast on science and technology. Host Alok Jha talks to our correspondents about the innovations, discoveries and gadgetry making the news. Published every Tuesday by Economist Podcasts.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Babbage: The child hepatitis mystery

    Babbage: The child hepatitis mystery

    Since April a mysterious outbreak of hepatitis in children around the world has baffled doctors. Some children have required liver transplants and more than 20 have died. Recent findings may link the spike in cases to covid-19 lockdowns. We examine the evidence and ask how a lack of exposure to bugs can affect immune systems. What other consequences could pandemic restrictions have for the long-term health of children—and adults? Kenneth Cukier hosts.
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 42 min
    Babbage: How AI cracked biology’s biggest problem

    Babbage: How AI cracked biology’s biggest problem

    DeepMind’s artificial-intelligence system AlphaFold has predicted the three-dimensional shape of almost all known proteins. The company’s boss Demis Hassabis tells us how the AI was able to solve what was, for decades, biology’s grand challenge. Plus, Gilead Amit, The Economist’s science correspondent, explores the significance of the breakthrough for scientists tackling neglected diseases and designing new molecules. The leap forward could be AI’s greatest contribution to biology to date, but how else could machine learning help science? Kenneth Cukier hosts.
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 34 min
    Babbage: Can technology personalise your diet?

    Babbage: Can technology personalise your diet?

    Digital tools and sophisticated wearable devices are being combined with the latest knowledge on metabolic science to build personalised eating plans. Slavea Chankova, The Economist’s health-care correspondent, explores the future of nutrition. Data from new nutrition technology can also be tied to exercise monitoring devices and blood biomarkers, to build algorithms that aim to make people get healthier. But can the emerging personalised nutrition era make a real difference to public health? Alok Jha hosts.
    Listen to our recent collection of episodes on the digital health revolution at economist.com/babbagewearables.
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 43 min
    Babbage: How to keep secrets in the age of quantum computing

    Babbage: How to keep secrets in the age of quantum computing

    The age of quantum computing is coming closer, presenting both an opportunity and a risk for individuals, companies and governments. Host Alok Jha explores why quantum computers threaten to crack the codes that keep data and communications secure over the internet. We also investigate how encryption techniques can be improved for a post-quantum age, and why it is urgent that they be deployed as soon as possible.
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 40 min
    Babbage: How did humans evolve?

    Babbage: How did humans evolve?

    The evolutionary journey that created modern humans was once thought to be relatively linear. But new technology is revealing a far more complex picture. The Economist’s Dylan Barry travels to South Africa to trace the story of our evolution, and explains how interbreeding with other species provided the genes possessed by many people today. To uncover our origins, scientists are nowadays not only hunting for clues in the bones of our ancestors—but in the genomes of living people, too. We speak to the researchers who are helping to rewrite the human story. Alok Jha hosts.
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 40 min
    Babbage: How to unlock the secrets of the universe—beyond the Standard Model

    Babbage: How to unlock the secrets of the universe—beyond the Standard Model

    This week, the Large Hadron Collider returned to life after a three-year upgrade. By recreating conditions as close as possible to the Big Bang, it might provide answers to some of physics’s greatest mysteries. Recent findings have shown chinks in the armour of the Standard Model of particle physics, currently scientists’ best understanding of the universe at its smallest scales. Through the lens of an intriguing anomalous result, host Alok Jha investigates the new theories that might supersede the Standard Model. How could such ideas impact our comprehension of the universe and what it contains?
    This episode follows our two-part series about the reopening of the Large Hadron Collider. Listen at economist.com/LHC-pod.
    For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions, subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 36 min

Críticas de clientes

4,6 de 5
14 classificações

14 classificações

Faraway from home ,

Far away from home

I never lose an episode. One of the best podcasts ever published. Thank you, Ken. Thank you, The Economist.

MarianaE ,

Very good as always

A very well done show with interesting and relevant subjects. One of my favourite podcasts on science and technology.

Nuno Inácio ,

Got worse overtime

80%+ of the articles and invitees used to be interesting to hear, now it’s becoming increasingly boring...

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