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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    Checks and Balance: Not so great

    Checks and Balance: Not so great

    President Trump’s effect on domestic policy in his first term has been modest and mostly reversible. The real impact of his blow-it-up style has been felt in the corrosion of an already poisonous political culture. How has his brand of anti-politics changed America? 


    Trump supporters at one of his last rallies before election day and his former press secretary Sean Spicer tell us why he deserves re-election. Lilliana Mason of the University of Maryland explains how partisanship has become radicalised.


    John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


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    • 46 min
    Net losses: plunder of the oceans

    Net losses: plunder of the oceans

    The staggering extent of illegal fishing, and its human and environmental costs, are only just becoming clear. We ask how to put a shadowy industry on a more even keel. The old guard likes to mock millennial investors, but they’re changing finance, possibly for the better. And as Berlin’s shiny new airport opens we ask: why is it nine years late? For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 21 min
    The Economist Asks: John Bolton

    The Economist Asks: John Bolton

    Whether Trump wins or loses the election, what next for the Republicans? The President’s former national security adviser lays out his vision of a Reagan-style future party, where Donald Trump is “a crazy uncle tweeting from the basement”. Also, what advice would Mr Bolton give a newly elected Joe Biden, who he calls “a man of character”. 
     
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    • 30 min
    What Xi said: China’s five-year plan

    What Xi said: China’s five-year plan

    The party’s Fifth Plenum sets out a five-year vision; we mine the plan for clues about how China views itself in the world—and how long Xi Jinping intends to lead. The pandemic has the rich world thinking and talking about death in a way not seen since the second world war. And an uncertain future for Singapore’s famed street-food hawkers.
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    • 21 min
    Babbage: Life, the universe and everything

    Babbage: Life, the universe and everything

    From precious moonwater to a handful of asteroid that could provide clues to the origins of life, recent discoveries in our solar system lead host Alok Jha to investigate fundamental questions about the universe. How did life on Earth begin? Could earthly evolution provide a guide to what life elsewhere might be like? And what about the end of everything—the death of the universe itself?


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    • 27 min
    Stumbling bloc: Europe’s second wave

    Stumbling bloc: Europe’s second wave

    Across the continent, covid-19 cases are rising steeply and containment measures are still divergent. We look at the challenges of finding policies that are efficacious and sustainable. Tanzania’s election today is all but zipped up; President John Magufuli has been trampling the country’s hard-won democratic traditions. And what the florid language of wine experts says about human perception.
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    • 19 min

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