44 episodes

Joshua Rozenberg presents Radio 4's long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion on matters relating to law

Law in Action BBC

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    • 5.0, 1 Rating

Joshua Rozenberg presents Radio 4's long-running legal magazine programme, featuring reports and discussion on matters relating to law

    Reinventing the law

    Reinventing the law

    How can the courts cope with the constraints of Coronavirus? That’s the challenge facing Lord Burnett of Maldon, head of the judiciary in England and Wales. Joshua Rozenberg asks the Lord Chief Justice whether new ways of working can deliver justice at a time of crisis.

    Among those innovations is mediation, Law in Action speaks to a court-based mediator and a court user whose case was resolved without leaving home.

    And we find out how lockdown is changing the civil courts. Can remote hearings work effectively?

    Researcher: Diane Richardson
    Producer: Neil Koenig

    • 28 min
    Gambling with the law

    Gambling with the law

    A poker player who used a Victorian conjuring trick to win £7.7 million from a London casino left court empty-handed in 2017 after a court found he “took positive steps to fix the deck”. But now judges have decided that the ruling in Phil Ivey’s case should be the test for dishonesty. Joshua Rozenberg explains how it works, while a gambler tells us that the courts have got it wrong.

    Also this week, how do you ensure social distancing in a crowded detention centre?

    And how is lockdown affecting the work of the civil justice system?


    Contributors:
    Dr Natalie Byrom, director of research at the Legal Education Foundation
    Toufique Hossain, director of public law at Duncan Lewis Solicitors
    Richard Munchkin, host, “Gambling with an Edge” podcast
    Professor David Ormerod, University College London

    Researcher: Diane Richardson
    Producer: Neil Koenig

    • 28 min
    Justice in lockdown

    Justice in lockdown

    Can virtual courts deliver justice? We speak to participants of a mock jury trial held by law reform group Justice, with legal teams and jurors replacing the courtroom with the sitting room.

    Scotland's second most senior judge, Lord Justice Clerk Lady Dorrian, outlines how socially distanced jury trials can resume safely in July.

    And Joshua Rozenberg asks Director of Service Prosecutions Andrew Cayley QC if the Service Prosecuting Authority is prosecuting cases of rape and sexual assault effectively and whether charges are likely to be brought against British military personnel accused of offences against Iraqi civilians.

    Researcher: Diane Richardson
    Producer: Neil Koenig

    • 28 min
    Workplace law

    Workplace law

    Recent high-profile discrimination claims have cast a media spotlight on the employment tribunals of England, Wales and Scotland. But how good are they are at resolving disputes between employers and staff? How independent are they of the government? And how well have they recovered from fee increases that meant some employment judges had to move jobs?

    Why an autistic man’s experiments with explosives were lawful. Joshua speaks to Jonathan Hall QC, Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation about the case of Chez Copeland, who spent almost two years in a maximum security prison for setting off explosions in his garden.

    Also US courtroom drama Judge Judy is to end after 25 years. Joshua asks Adam Benforado, associate professor of law, about the show’s legacy and popularity.

    Producer: Neil Koenig
    Researcher: Diane Richardson

    • 28 min
    Deferred Prosecution Agreements: pragmatic but unprincipled?

    Deferred Prosecution Agreements: pragmatic but unprincipled?

    Earlier this year, Airbus was ordered to pay nearly €1bn by a criminal court in London. The penalty, for failure to prevent bribery, was more than twice the fines paid by defendants in England and Wales for the whole of 2018. In addition, the global aerospace company was required to pay fines totalling €2.6bn in France and the United States. But Airbus has not been convicted of any crimes and nobody has gone to prison. Joshua Rozenberg Investigates deferred prosecution agreements.

    Contributors:
    Tim Bowden, partner, Dechert
    Alex Brummer, City editor of the Daily Mail
    Toby Duthie, co-founder, Forensic Risk Alliance
    Duncan Hames, director of policy, Transparency International
    Laura Haywood, case controller, Serious Fraud Office
    Eric Russo, prosecutor, Parquet National Financier
    Janette Rutterford, emeritus professor of finance and financial history, Open University Business School

    Researcher: Diane Richardson
    Producer: Neil Koenig

    • 28 min
    An Enterprising Court

    An Enterprising Court

    Tucked away in the City of London is one of the UK’s most successful invisible exports. But is the Commercial Court threatened by international developments? Joshua Rozenberg investigates.

    Italy has extended its emergency coronavirus measures and Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte has ordered people to stay at home. Lawyer Mariella Melandri tells Law In Action how this is affecting her legal practice and clients.

    The government is planning emergency legislation allowing people who are forced to self-isolate to appear in court by video link or telephone. Is this an adequate substitute for a face-to-face hearing? Joshua speaks to immigration barrister Colin Yeo.

    Also, is India’s Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) unconstitutional? Dr Rahul Rao, Senior Lecturer in Politics at the School of Oriental and African Studies at London University, explains why this controversial law is being challenged in the Indian Supreme Court.

    Producer: Neil Koenig
    Researcher: Di Richardson

    • 27 min

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