194 episodes

Welcome to The Psychology Podcast with Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman, where we give you insights into the mind, brain, behavior and creativity. Each episode we’ll feature a guest who will stimulate your mind, and give you a greater understanding of your self, others, and the world we live in. Hopefully, we’ll also provide a glimpse into human possibility! Thanks for listening and enjoy the podcast.

The Psychology Podcast Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman

    • Social Sciences

Welcome to The Psychology Podcast with Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman, where we give you insights into the mind, brain, behavior and creativity. Each episode we’ll feature a guest who will stimulate your mind, and give you a greater understanding of your self, others, and the world we live in. Hopefully, we’ll also provide a glimpse into human possibility! Thanks for listening and enjoy the podcast.

    184: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone

    184: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone

    Today we’re excited to have Lori Gottlieb on the podcast. Gottlieb is a psychotherapist and New York Times bestselling author of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone, which is being adapted as a television series with Eva Longoria. In addition to her clinical practice, she writes The Atlantic’s weekly “Dear Therapist” advice column and is the co-host of iHeart’s upcoming “Dear Therapists” podcast, produced by Katie Couric. She is also a TED speaker, a ​member of the Advisory Council for Bring Change to Mind, and advisor to the Aspen Institute. She is a sought-after expert in media such as The Today Show, Good Morning America, The CBS Early Show, CNN, and NPR’s “Fresh Air.” Learn more at LoriGottlieb.com or by following her @LoriGottlieb1 on Twitter.

    In this episode we discuss:
    The fundamental themes of human existence Irvin Yalom’s influence on Lori Gottlieb Why we feel isolated in our experiences The loneliness crisis on college campuses How the internet helps us numb How to know when social media has become an addiction Why happiness as a goal is a disaster SBK analyzes Lori Gottlieb Why we are often scared to do things that excite us Why there is no “hierarchy of pain” The hierarchy of pain and the social justice movement Why is it so hard for us to change when we know what to do? Why we don’t let ourselves be happy The importance of self-compassion The most important factor in the success of therapy What makes for a boring patient? Why feelings sometimes don’t care about facts Common myths of therapy “Part of us wants something and there’s another part of us that goes against the thing we want” Why “our feelings need air” How numbness is a state of being overwhelmed by too many feelings The importance of seeing your own agency and the choices you have

    • 1 hr 8 min
    183: Normal Sucks

    183: Normal Sucks

    “The only normal people are the people you don’t know very well.” — Jonathan Mooney
    Today we have Jonathan Mooney on the podcast. Jonathan is a dyslexic writer and speaker who did not learn to read until 12 years old. He faced a number of low expectations growing up— was told he would flip burgers, be a high school drop out and end up in jail. Needless to say these prophecies didn’t come to pass. Today, he speaks across the nation about neurological and physical diversity, inspiring those who live with differences and advocating for change. Mooney’s work has been featured in outlets such as The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, HBO, NPR, and ABC News, and his books include The Short Bus, Learning Outside the Lines, and most recently, Normal Sucks: How to Live, Learn, and Thrive Outside the Lines. 
    In this episode we discuss:
    What is normal? How the creation of special ed was originally an act of inclusion The unintended complications of creating a special education program Jonathan’s story growing up in special ed The twice-exceptional (2e) movement How giftedness comes with a “complicated brew” of assets and challenges The importance of recognizing the 2e within ourselves and sharing that with the world The importance of not hiding the things that make us different, but celebrating those things How Jonathan once took on many personas to hide his differences How the average got conflated with the impossible ideal in society The value judgement that is placed on IQ from a cultural perspective Going from “How smart are you?” to “How are you smart”? Jonathan feeling deficient because he was different How Jonathan went on a journey driving a school bus across the United States and listened to people with atypical brains and bodies The value of human fallibility The Eye to Eye mentoring program How the private sector corporate diversity policies can make difference by including atypical brains and bodies as part of diversity initiatives

    • 55 min
    182: The Joy of Suffering and the Downside of Empathy

    182: The Joy of Suffering and the Downside of Empathy

    Today it's great to have Paul Bloom on the podcast. Dr. Bloom is the Brooks and Suzanne Ragen Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science at Yale University. His research explores how children and adults understand the physical and social world, with special focus on morality, religion, fiction, and art. He is past-president of the Society for Philosophy and Psychology, and co-editor of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, one of the major journals in the field. Dr. Bloom is also author or editor of seven books, including Against Empathy: The Case for Rational Compassion 
    In this wide-ranging and provocative episode we discuss:
     
    Paul's graduate research with Steven Pinker Is language the result of biological evolution or cultural evolution? What "hardwired" really means Why innate mechanisms require environmental input The necessity of bias Some potential downsides of empathy The case for rational compassion  Cognitive empathy vs. affective empathy  Did Hitler have the capacity for empathy?  The joy of suffering  Why do we choose to suffer? The fundamental human need for exploration The human need to overcome challenges Would some people be content watching Netflix and smoking pot all day? The relationship between income and happiness  The importance of spending money well The psychology of expectation and pleasure If someone offer you more money, should you take it? Relief vs. pleasure Does enjoying something depend on how much we think we will enjoy something? Art and authenticity  Art and value judgements Would Tarzan believe in God? Are babies basically good? Why religion is so pervasive Are babies moral? How a powerful moral sense is responsible for an extraordinary amount of evil in the world Is moral grandstanding always bad? Why not everything is virtue signaling

    • 1 hr 8 min
    181: Stop Missing Your Life

    181: Stop Missing Your Life

    Today it’s great to have Cory Muscara on the podcast. Cory is an international speaker and teacher on the topics of presence and well-being. He believes that when people are deeply fulfilled, they are a better force in the world for other beings, the environment, and their communities. For several years he taught mindfulness-based leadership at Columbia University and currently serves as an assistant instructor of positive psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2012, Cory spent 6 months in silence living as a monk in Burma, meditating 14+ hours per day, and now aims to bring these teachings to people in a practical and usable way, presenting to schools, organizations and healthcare systems, as well as through workshops and retreats for the general public. Named by Dr. Oz as one of the nation’s leading experts on mindfulness, his meditations have now been heard more than 10 million times in over 100 countries. Cory is host of the popular daily podcast, Practicing Human, and the author of Stop Missing Your Life: How to Be Deeply Present in an Un-Present World.
    In this episode we discuss:
    Cory’s transformation from frat boy to monk Can monks be self-actualizing? The importance of not being enslaved by certain parts of you How to overcame pain through mindfulness The emotional body vs. the sensation body The process of detaching sensations from the labels we put on them Equanimity and allowing life to happen How equanimity is more about our internal experience than our external experience The “pain box” How to soften the “pain wall” Dispelling the myth of the “real you” Barriers to real connection What it means to be fully seen and accepted The importance of radical acceptance How the more parts of you that are brought in and accepted the more you feel as though the wholeness of you is accepted and seen The "scrollercoaster" meditation How we can take control of technology and take back our lives




     

    • 58 min
    180: Become an Emotion Scientist

    180: Become an Emotion Scientist

    “Emotion skills are the key to unlocking the potential inside each one of us. And in the process of developing those skills, we each, heart by heart, mind by mind, create a culture and society unlike anything we’ve experienced thus far— and very much like the one we might dare to imagine.”  -- Marc Brackett
    Today it's great to have Marc Brackett on the podcast. Dr. Brackett is founding director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and professor in the Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine at Yale University. His research focuses on the role of emotions and emotional intelligence in learning, decision making, creativity, relationships, health, and performance. Marc is the lead developer of RULER, an evidence-based, systemic approach to SEL that has been adopted by over 2,000 preschool to high schools across the United States and in other countries. He has published 125 scholarly articles and received numerous awards, including the Joseph E. Zins award for his research on social and emotional learning. He also is on the board of directors for the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL). Marc consults regularly with corporations like Facebook, Microsoft, and Google on integrating emotional intelligence principles into employee training and product design and is co-founder of Oji Life Lab, a digital emotional intelligence learning system for businesses. His research has been featured in popular media outlets such as the New York Times, USA Today, Good Morning America, and NPR. He is the author of Permission to Feel: Unlocking the Power of Emotions to Help our Kids, Ourselves, and our Society Thrive, published by Celadon Books, a division of Macmillan, which has been translated into 15 languages.
    In this wide-ranging episode we discuss:
    How Mark is feeling Mark’s rough childhood and how he felt “trapped in his feelings” Negative outcomes that can ensue when you don’t feel you have the permission to feel Some harrowing statistics about how depression and anxiety are on the rise How does the original Salovey and Meyer model of emotional intelligence differ from Daniel Goleman’s model? The emotion scientist vs. the emotion judge Skills of the emotion scientist How Marc’s Uncle changed Marc’s life forever by giving him permission to feel The main components of the RULER framework The many factors that influence how we express our emotions authentically and honestly The mood meter poster and app that allows you to track your emotions over time and look at patterns The malleability of emotional intelligence The difference between temperament and emotional intelligence  The most important thing Marc learned through teaching emotional intelligence How more emotional intelligence can bring world peace (at least according to a 3rd grader) Why we need to spend more time cultivating emotional intelligence

    • 45 min
    179: Humanizing Evil

    179: Humanizing Evil

    “I firmly believe there is no person, no group, no behavior, no thing that is objectively evil. Perhaps evil only really exists in our fears.” -- Julia Shaw
    Today it’s great to have Dr. Julia Shaw on the podcast. Dr. Shaw is a psychological scientist at UCL. She is best known for her work in the areas of memory and criminal psychology. In 2017 Dr. Shaw co-founded the memory science and artificial intelligence start-up Spot. Spot helps employees report workplace harassment and discrimination, and empowers organizations to build a more inclusive and respectful work environment. In 2016 she published her bestselling debut book "The Memory Illusion", which has appeared in 20 languages and in 2019 she published her second international bestseller "Evil: The Science Behind Humanity's Dark Side".
    Note: This episode goes down a lot of taboo alleys. The dark side of human nature  is a fascinating topic, but there may be some issues that you'd rather not hear about. Please review the list of topics before listening to this episode.
    In this episode we discuss:
    How Julia got into criminal psychology How we all do “reality crafting” The depths of human hypocrisy Why we don’t always act in accord with our own morality Julia Shaw’s criticism of the label “evil” The neuroscience of “evil” and Hitler’s brain Your brain on porn How kink is stigmatized in our society Can you be a feminist and engage in BDSM? The “deviant sexual interests” scale The prevalence of rape fantasies Pedophiles vs. ephebophiles Why “curiosity shaming” limits discussion and understanding The science of beastiality and what makes one animal sexier than another animal Why we shame vegans Rape culture and how systems fail and lead to harm What we can do to reduce sexual violence in society The bright side of your dark side How we can use the dark side to be a hero (the heroic imagination)

    • 1 hr 13 min

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