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Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox is a weekly podcast that shares how to put the teachings of Buddhism into practice to be happier, more peaceful, or to become the spiritual warrior this world so desperately needs. JoAnn Fox has been teaching Buddhism for 17 years and does so with kindness and humor.

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fo‪x‬ JoAnn Fox: Buddhist Teacher

    • Buddhism
    • 5.0 • 2 betyg

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox is a weekly podcast that shares how to put the teachings of Buddhism into practice to be happier, more peaceful, or to become the spiritual warrior this world so desperately needs. JoAnn Fox has been teaching Buddhism for 17 years and does so with kindness and humor.

    Episode 99:- 3 Poisons, 3 Virtuous Roots

    Episode 99:- 3 Poisons, 3 Virtuous Roots

    The slogan ‘Three objects, three poisons, and three seeds of virtue.
     
    Some feelings are painful, like hate, but we often don’t recognize that feelings are suffering. We are busy focusing on an object that appears to be causing the hate or the lust, rather than understanding that feelings are manifestations of our karma. Positive feelings like happiness are the product of good karma. Feelings can be endured, transformed into virtue, or be a trigger to react in a way that causes more negative karma. The three poisons are anger, attachment, and ignorance, the delusions- or uncontrolled states of mind at the root of all delusions. Objects are the objects of our attachment, anger and delusion: the people and things we lust over, crave, or become angry with,
     
    “Three objects, three poisons, three roots of virtue.”
    This slogan of the mind training practice, called Lojong in Tibetan, was prescribed by the great Indian Buddhist master Atisha to transform difficulties into the path to awakening.  The objects of the three poisons are not innately desirable or undesirable. The experience of the three poisons also do not have to lead to creating negative karma. In this episode, we use the meditation practice called Taking and Giving to use our experiences of anger, lust, or craving as a cause of awakening.
     
    There’s no fire like lust,
         No grasping like hate,
    No snare like delusion,
         No river like craving. (252)
    —Buddha, the Dhammapada
     
    Links and References
    Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.63-64.
     

    • 31 min
    Episode 98 - Rejoicing Versus Jealousy

    Episode 98 - Rejoicing Versus Jealousy

    When we’re jealous, there’s a wish that another would not have the happiness or good fortune we’re observing. It is the opposite of a bodhisattva wish for others to be happy, for jealousy actually wishes that others not have happiness. This is why jealousy is such a hindrance on the path to enlightenment because it conjures a very different intention than the compassionate, bodhicitta intention were trying to cultivate. 
     
    A Buddhist definition of jealousy: A disturbing state of mind that involves an inability to bear another’s fortune due to being attached to something someone else has. It involves hatred and has the function of causing discomfort of mind and not abiding in happiness.
     
    Jealousy uncovers an unmet need, an unfulfilled wish, or an insecurity. When our mind is focused on jealous thoughts it feeds our insecurity, perception of being less, not having what we want. The more more we let our mind dwell in jealousy, the more our insecurity or feeling of lack grows. 
     
    Sometimes we’re jealous and we want that happiness for selves; they got the promotion that we wanted. They got the girl that we wanted. At other times we don’t want them to be happy because we feel it obstructs our own happiness. For example, when we don’t want our partner to go out and have fun with their friends because we want them to stay with us and make us happy.
     
    Benefits of rejoicing in others good qualities or good fortune
    Antidote to jealousy  Mental peace Creates the karma to have the quality or good fortune we are rejoicing in Better relationships with other people Creates a harmonious workplace, home, etc.  
    According to their faith,
          According to their satisfaction,
    People give.
    This being the case,
    If one is envious 
          Of the food and drink given to others,
    One does not attain samadhi 
          By day or night.
    But by cutting out, uprooting and discarding,
          This envious state 
    One gains samadhi 
           By day or by night. (Verse 249-250)
    --Buddha, The Dhammapada
     
    Links and References
    Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.63-64.
    Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 144-150.

    • 23 min
    Episode 97 - New Mind, New Life

    Episode 97 - New Mind, New Life

    In order to change our experiences, we have to change the way we think, feel, and react. As long as we maintain the same habits of mind, our lives will continue with a similar amount of suffering, anxiety, or anger. Buddha teaches us that our lives are projected from our mind. In this episode, we will attempt a daily meditation and mindfulness practice to change our thoughts and feelings and project a new, more peaceful reality. 
     
    Easy is life 
    For someone without a conscience,
    Bold as a crow,
    Obtrusive, deceitful, reckless, and corrupt. 
     
    Difficult if life
    For someone with a conscience,
    Always searching for what’s pure,
    Discerning, sincere, cautious, and clean-living.
     
    One digs up one’s own root
    Here is this very world
    If one kills, steals, lies,
    Goes to another’s partner
    Or gives oneself up to drink and intoxicants.
     
    Good person, know this:
    Evil traits are reckless!
    Don’t let greed and wrongdoing
    Oppress you with long-term suffering. (verse 248)
    --Buddha, The Dhammapada
     
    Links and References
    Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.63-64.
    Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 144-150.

    • 28 min
    Episode 96 - Ignorance, The Greatest Corruption

    Episode 96 - Ignorance, The Greatest Corruption

    In this verse, the Buddha says that the greatest corruption is ignorance. Ignorance is an unknowing; it is not knowing something. What is it that we do not know that is our greatest corruption because it is the underlying cause of all our suffering and confusion? It is ignorance of the way things actually exist as opposed to the way they appear. It is an unknowing of reality. 
     
    The mistaken way we are viewing everything is that we believe that all things exist exactly as they appear, in an independent and self contained way. We believe things exist independently of our perception, that a cup is a cup independent of our labeling it a cup. In fact, all things are dependent arising; they depend on many factors bringing them into existence including our own perception and labeling of them. We label ourselves good, bad, tall, short, skinny, fat. We label our life good or bad and all of our experiences we label as good or bad. We do not label them as appearances to our mind. But, in reality ourselves, other people, and all the experiences of our life are actually appearances that we have created with our mind. The special wisdom is called the wisdom of emptiness. This is a wisdom that realizes that our reality and all the things that we see are empty of inherent existence. Things do not exist inherently, independent of causes and conditions or the perception of our mind. Things do exist, but they do not exist the way that they appear.



    More corrupt than these,
    Is ignorance, the greatest corruption. 
    Having abandoned this corruption, 
    Monks, remain corruption free! (Verse 243)
    --Buddha, the Dhammapada
     
    References
     
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp.63. 
    Guide to the Bodhisattva’s Way of Life by Acharya Shantideva. Translated into 
     
    Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, Volume 3. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor. Pages 1961, 2014, 2019. 

    • 23 min
    Episode 95 - Moral Discipline

    Episode 95 - Moral Discipline

    Within the Four NobleTruths, Buddha taught the method to end suffering, which is the Eightfold Path. The Eightfold Path has three areas of focus: moral discipline, mental discipline, and wisdom. In almost all his discourses when teaching directly to people, Buddha included the Eightfold path. In this verse, Buddha is giving an explanation on moral discipline, and if we look at early Buddhism, directly from Buddha, we see that there is a great emphasis on right conduct and moral discipline. Why would this be? It is because moral discipline is the foundation of happiness. 
     
    Bad conduct is corruption in a person; 
    Stinginess, corruption in a giver.
    Evil traits corrupt people 
    In both this world and the next. (242)*
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada  



    The Noble Eightfold Path
    Right understanding (Samma ditthi) Right thought (Samma sankappa)
     
    Right speech (Samma vaca)  Right action (Samma kammanta) Right livelihood (Samma ajiva)  
    Right effort (Samma vayama) Right mindfulness (Samma sati) Right concentration (Samma samadhi)


    Links and References
    Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.62-63.
    Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 144-150.
     

    • 28 min
    Episode 94 - What Would Love Have Me Do?

    Episode 94 - What Would Love Have Me Do?

    What is joyous perseverance (effort)?
     
    “When you have focused upon something virtuous, joyous perseverance is enthusiasm for it. Engaging in the Bodhisattva Deeds says:
     
    What is joyous perseverance? It is delight in virtue. 
     
    The Bodhisattva Levels explains it as a flawless state of mind that is enthusiastic about accumulating virtue and working for the welfare of living beings, together with the physical, verbal, and mental activity such a state of mind motivates.” —Je Tsongkhapa (reference below)
     
    Joyous perseverance is supreme among virtues; Based on it, you subsequently attain the rest. 
     
    One who has joyous perseverance
    Is not brought down 
    By prosperity, afflictions, 
    Discouragement, or petty attainments.
    —Ornament for the Mahāyāna Sūtras 
     
    As rust corrupts 
    The very iron that formed it, 
    So transgressions lead 
    Their doer to states of woe
     
    Oral teachings become corrupted when not recited,
    Homes become corrupted by inactivity,
    Sloth corrupts physical beauty,
    Negligence corrupts a guardian. (Verse 241)
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada  



    Links and References
    Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.62.
    Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 183-185.

    • 29 min

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