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Farmerama Radio is an award-winning podcast sharing the voices behind regenerative farming.

We are committed to positive ecological futures for the earth and its people, and we believe that farmers of the world will determine this.

Each month, we share the experiences of grass roots farmers instigating radical change for the future of our food, our health, and the planet. Tune in to hear how these producers are discovering a more ecological farming future and to learn how their decisions can have a positive impact on us all. This is regenerative farming in action.

Farmeram‪a‬ Acast

    • Personliga dagböcker

Farmerama Radio is an award-winning podcast sharing the voices behind regenerative farming.

We are committed to positive ecological futures for the earth and its people, and we believe that farmers of the world will determine this.

Each month, we share the experiences of grass roots farmers instigating radical change for the future of our food, our health, and the planet. Tune in to hear how these producers are discovering a more ecological farming future and to learn how their decisions can have a positive impact on us all. This is regenerative farming in action.

    62: ORFC 2021

    62: ORFC 2021

    This month we invite you to join us as we take a dip into some of the key sessions at the recent Global Oxford Real Farming Conference, where Farmerama were official media partners again this year. We hear from two women lawyers in Aotearoa New Zealand who tell us about how a river and a forest have been given legal personhood. Then, we hear how an economic think-tank and a London CSA have worked together to understand the community benefits of localised routes to market and local organic food. Next, we head to Cape Town to hear about food justice from two women working at a farming cooperative. Finally, we hear from an indigenous seedkeeper and leader in Turtle Island (the United States) about cultivating ancestral brilliance and regenerative economies.

    • 30 min
    61: Fine Fleeces, Pasture Cropping and Land in Commons

    61: Fine Fleeces, Pasture Cropping and Land in Commons

    It’s good to be back this month with a collection of conversations with farmers who are building a more ecological future. We begin at Whistlebare Farm learning how raising sheep and goats ecologically results in wool that’s extra special – all because of good work going on in the soil. We head to France, to Andy Cato’s farm, to hear about his regenerative learning journey, and discover how he’s putting that learning into practice here in the UK. And finally, we’re in Germany, where the Kulturland Cooperative has created an innovative funding model bringing farmland back into common ownership, and securing it for generations to come.

    • 39 min
    "Who feeds us?" Episode 6: Looking back and moving forward

    "Who feeds us?" Episode 6: Looking back and moving forward

    In this final episode, we revisit some of the people we’ve heard from throughout the series. We tease out some common threads that bind these apparently disparate voices together – threads such as reverence, gratitude, sovereignty, dignity and abundance. We hear more about what these people have learnt over the course of this year, their visions for resilient, localised food economies... and how they see the future of who feeds us.

    It is clearer than ever: Food is not just a question of calories. Food is nourishment for the body and soul. Food is about community, culture and our relationship with each other and with the Earth. We are all part of the food system.

    The journey ahead – towards a truly resilient, humane and nourishing food system, a food system rooted in abundance – that journey is complicated, and it will most likely be bumpy. But this series is an invitation to embrace that complexity, to dive into it, to seek out and connect with those who feed us. After all – food doesn’t come from shelves. Food comes from the soil, the sea – and the hands of people. This is who feeds us.

    Featuring:
    Skye Gyngell: https://springrestaurant-shop.co.uk/
    Jane Scotter: http://fernverrow.com/
    Salma & Khalil Attan: https://www.bushwoodbees.co.uk/ // https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVrsm10F2zp_KO26MBCGRUw
    Ursula Myrie: https://www.adira.org.uk/
    Angus Buchanan-Smith: https://www.the-free-company.com/
    Dee Woods: https://granvillecommunitykitchen.wordpress.com/
    Dr Lisa Palmer: https://www.bcu.ac.uk/social-sciences/sociology/staff/lisa-palmer
    Muhsen Hassanin: https://abrahamshalalmeat.com/
    Abigail Holsborough: https://www.brixtonwindmill.org/
    Rosy Benson: www.fieldbakery.com/
    Lynda McFarlane: https://veganvybes.co.uk/

    Farmerama.co
    Producers: Jo Barratt, Katie Revell, Abby Rose, Suzie McCarthy
    Additional interview: Lovejit Dhaliwal
    Series Executive Producers: Jo Barratt, Katie Revell, Abby Rose
    Community Collaborators: Cathy St Germans, Zain Dada, Andre Reid
    Project Manager: Olivia Oldham
    Artwork: Hannah Grace www.hgraceoc.com/
    Music: Michael O'Neil
    PR & Comms: Fran Bailey, Kate Lam, Elma Glasgow, Nancy Brownlow

    Who Feeds Us? is possible thanks to the Farming the Future COVID Response Fund. We’re very grateful to The A Team Foundation, the Roddick Foundation, Thirty Percy and the Samworth Foundation for providing the funds to make this project happen.

    • 34 min
    "Who feeds us?" Episode 5: Cultivating abundance

    "Who feeds us?" Episode 5: Cultivating abundance

    In this episode, we visit one region – the West Midlands – to explore how the pandemic has highlighted connections between the local and the global, the present and the past...and between food, health, community and identity.

    What can we learn from this time about the experiences, the resources and the needs of individuals and communities in the UK – and, in particular, communities of African descent?

    How can having access to land, to green space and growing space, “feed” us in multiple ways – physical, emotional and spiritual?

    Does being together in growing spaces allow the experience of abundance and the ability to share in that?

    Featuring:
    Lynda McFarlane: https://veganvybes.co.uk/
    Dr Lisa Palmer: https://www.bcu.ac.uk/social-sciences/sociology/staff/lisa-palmer
    Andre Reid: https://kiondo.co.uk/

    Farmerama.co
    Producer: DeMarkay Williams
    Executive Producers: Jo Barratt, Katie Revell, Abby Rose
    Community Collaborator: Andre Reid
    Project Manager: Olivia Oldham
    Artwork: Hannah Grace www.hgraceoc.com/
    Music: Michael O'Neil
    PR & Comms: Fran Bailey, Kate Lam, Elma Glasgow, Nancy Brownlow

    Who Feeds Us? is possible thanks to the Farming the Future COVID Response Fund. We’re very grateful to The A Team Foundation, the Roddick Foundation, Thirty Percy and the Samworth Foundation for providing the funds to make this project happen.

    • 38 min
    "Who feeds us?" Episode 4: Whole meal

    "Who feeds us?" Episode 4: Whole meal

    At the start of lockdown, as supermarket shelves were cleared of flour, people who might not otherwise have thought to seek out a local bakery – let alone a local mill – started to do just that. In this episode, we’ll hear about how this sudden upsurge in demand presented a huge challenge for these small-scale bakers and millers – but it was a challenge they met with enthusiasm and ingenuity, as well as a deep sense of responsibility to their communities.

    At one time, pretty much every town and village had its own flour mill, driven by wind or water. Today, across the whole of London, just one working windmill remains – Brixton Windmill. It’s a unique heritage site with a rich educational programme. But as lockdown began, the mill became much more than a historic curiosity – and its volunteers found themselves providing a vital service to the local community. Meanwhile, bakers across the country, from the city of Bristol to the highlands of Scotland, were baking nourishing loaves for the people who needed them most.

    These bakers and millers, many of whom have spent the last few years investigating the connections between the bread, the mills, the farms that produce the grain, and, crucially, the soil in which that grain grows, are engaged in building a better system – one that looks very different to the one that produces most of the bread we eat in the UK today. When inflexible, centralised supermarket supply chains buckled, join us to learn how they were able to carry on producing flour, baking bread and feeding people – thanks to the localised, adaptable, human-scale infrastructure they’re part of.

    How can we grow that infrastructure? How can we all become part of a more resilient, equitable, efficient and enjoyable bread system? How can we help local millers stock local takeaways with bread baked with their flour? How can we help people to understand that, if they care about good bread, they also have to care about healthy soil? And how can we make sure that we celebrate everyone involved in making our bread – and that we listen to what they have to say?

    Featuring:
    Abigail Holsborough: https://www.brixtonwindmill.org/
    Rosy Benson: https://www.fieldbakery.com/
    Rosie Gray: http://www.revivingfood.co.uk/

    Farmerama.co
    Producer: Dave Pickering
    Executive Producers: Jo Barratt, Katie Revell, Abby Rose
    Community Collaborators: Cathy St Germans, Col Gordon
    Project Manager: Olivia Oldham
    Artwork: Hannah Grace www.hgraceoc.com/
    Music: Michael O'Neil
    PR & Comms: Fran Bailey, Kate Lam, Elma Glasgow, Nancy Brownlow

    Who Feeds Us? is possible thanks to the Farming the Future COVID Response Fund. We’re very grateful to The A Team Foundation, the Roddick Foundation, Thirty Percy and the Samworth Foundation for providing the funds to make this project happen.

    • 39 min
    "Who feeds us?" Episode 3: Growing our own

    "Who feeds us?" Episode 3: Growing our own

    As lockdown came into effect, and supermarkets struggled to restock their fruit and vegetable aisles, the idea of “growing your own” took on a new significance. In towns and cities across the UK, those of us lucky enough to have access to gardens or balconies – even if we’d never grown anything before – suddenly started looking for compost, tools, and seeds.

    Many of us discovered, perhaps for the first time, the joy of eating freshly picked, homegrown fruit and veg. It’s a joy that you just don’t get when you bite into something that’s been harvested unripe on the other side of the world, flown across oceans to be processed somewhere else, then eventually picked up from a supermarket chiller here in the UK – maybe weeks later.

    But, to grow your own food, the first thing you need are seeds. For millennia – for the vast majority of our agricultural history, in fact – farmers saved their own seed. Over time, plants adapted to the specifics of the area they were growing in, and local varieties emerged. But when seed companies developed F1 hybrids, which can’t be harvested and re-sown year after year, things changed. The genetics of these hybrids are too unstable – there’s no knowing how your crop will turn out. So farmers and growers reliant on F1 hybrids have to buy their seeds every single year.

    By saving and sharing open-pollinated seed, farmers and growers – and communities – are helping make sure our food supply can withstand the shocks of climate change. And, they’re also reclaiming collective control of the seeds we all depend on to feed ourselves – ensuring that we all have access to those seeds, even during a crisis – like a pandemic.

    Featuring:
    Astrid Guillabeau:
    Neville Portas: https://nodiggitygdns.wordpress.com/
    Dee Woods: https://granvillecommunitykitchen.wordpress.com/
    Helene Schulze: https://www.seedsovereignty.info/

    Farmerama.co
    Producer: Alice Armstrong
    Executive Producers: Jo Barratt, Katie Revell, Abby Rose
    Community Collaborators: Andre Reid, Dhelia Snoussi
    Project Manager: Olivia Oldham
    Artwork: Hannah Grace www.hgraceoc.com/
    Music: Michael O'Neil
    PR & Comms: Fran Bailey, Kate Lam, Elma Glasgow, Nancy Brownlow

    Who Feeds Us? is possible thanks to the Farming the Future COVID Response Fund. We’re very grateful to The A Team Foundation, the Roddick Foundation, Thirty Percy and the Samworth Foundation for providing the funds to make this project happen.

    • 31 min

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