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Business can be faddish. Paul Jarley, dean of the UCF College of Business, is on a mission to separate fads from fundamental change that will impact students. Join us as we chat with experts, enthusiasts and interesting people to talk business and pose the question… Is This Really a Thing?

Is This Really a Thing? UCF College of Business

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Business can be faddish. Paul Jarley, dean of the UCF College of Business, is on a mission to separate fads from fundamental change that will impact students. Join us as we chat with experts, enthusiasts and interesting people to talk business and pose the question… Is This Really a Thing?

    Is The Invitational Your Thing?

    Is The Invitational Your Thing?

    As the name explains, The Invitational is the UCF College of Business' invite-only career fair, designed to connect top business students with employers and college partners seeking to fill internships within their organization. In this episode, Paul Jarley speaks with employers and recruiters to learn the best tactics to help you find your dream job.

     



    Featured Guests



    Amanda Valiente - Eli Lilly

    Mateo Perez - Enterprise Rent-A-Car

    Brittney Brown - City Furniture

    Dylan D'Orazio - Gartner



     

    Episode Transcription

    Episode transcription coming soon!



    Listen to all episodes of "Is This Really a Thing?" at business.ucf.edu/podcast.

    • 7 min
    Is Sean Snaith Really a Thing? – Florida’s Economy in 2020

    Is Sean Snaith Really a Thing? – Florida’s Economy in 2020

    A media darling of sorts, UCF economist Sean Snaith's presentations across Central Florida tend to be an 80/20 mix of economic forecasting and comedy sketches. But the Director of the UCF Institute for Economic Forecasting means business - his forecasts have been named one of the nation's most accurate. This episode takes a "behind-the-scenes" look at Snaith's forecasting methods while exploring his thoughts on the state of the Florida economy in 2020.

     



    Featured Guests



    Sean Snaith - Director, UCF Institute for Economic Forecasting

    Erika Hodges - Director, Communications & Marketing, UCF College of Business

    Jessica Dourney - Assistant Director, Outreach & Engagement, UCF College of Business



    Episode Highlights



    1:48 - Paul Jarley introduces Sean Snaith

    2:37 - What the Florida economy is going through

    3:28 - Commentary from the "Mean Girls"

    4:14 - Florida's housing market

    07:04 - Sean Snaith: "King of the Nerds"

    11:09 - Growth by industry in Florida

    15:06 - Job and population growth in the state

    17:01 - Questions from the audience

    21:30 - Paul Jarley's final thoughts





     

    Episode Transcription

    Paul Jarley:                         Sean Snaith is central Florida's favorite economic forecaster. Sean has been named one of the nation's most accurate forecasters by Bloomberg News and as appeared on pretty much every media outlet from the Wall Street Journal to the BBC. But he has some very strange hobbies.



    Sean Snaith:                       If you've heard me speak over the years, you know I have an affinity for SkyMall.



    Paul Jarley:                         You remember SkyMall, It's the defunct inflight shopping catalog that survives on the internet. Well, Sean, he might just be their biggest fan.



    Sean Snaith:                       The Dean called it a fetish, I think, last year, which, that sounds a little dirty.



    Paul Jarley:                         He's also a bit of a diva who dreams of becoming a viral internet sensation?



    Sean Snaith:                       So, everybody can't be a social influencer though. I mean, I think that's where they all want to be. I do too. Quite frankly, I've got 1300 on Twitter. I don't know what I can offer to them, but.



    Paul Jarley:                         And he hates being handled, especially by the college's so called mean girls.



    Sean Snaith:                       There's a group of, largely women, in the college of business and there'll be shaking you down for money here at the end of the event, but I like to refer to them collectively as the mean girls and they sort of followed me since middle school and they make fun of my clothing and my glasses and things like that.



    Speaker 3:                           I don't know if you've seen his PowerPoint slides, but we think they date back to the mid 1980s.



    Paul Jarley:                         Is Sean Snaith really worth all this trouble? Are those forecasts right? Or do those mean girls have a point?



    Speaker 4:                           That is so fetch.



    Speaker 5:                           Gretchen, stop trying to make fetch happen. It's not going to happen.



    Paul Jarley:                         This issue is all about separating hype from fundamental change. I'm Paul Jarley, Dean of the College of Business here at UCF, I've got lots of questions. To get answers, I'm talking to people with interesting insights into the future of business. Have you ever wondered, is this really a thing? Onto our show.



    Paul Jarley:                       

    • 22 min
    Is a 2020 Recession Really a Thing?

    Is a 2020 Recession Really a Thing?

    In the midst of the longest economic recovery in American history, the big question is when the next recession will hit. With unemployment reaching record lows, job growth skyrocketing and consumer confidence at an all-time high, some economists see no end in sight for the expansion that began in 2009. On the other hand, manufacturing is at a 10-year low while the U.S.-China trade war continues. Can the U.S. really avoid a recession in 2020? Or is the bubble about to pop?

     



    Featured Guests



    Glenn Hubbard '79 - Economist; Chairman of the Board, MetLife Inc.

    Sean Snaith - Director, UCF Institute for Economic Forecasting

    John Solow - Kenneth White and James Xander Professor in Economics, UCF College of Business

    Sami Alpanda - Associate Professor, Economics, UCF College of Business



    Episode Highlights



    0:48 - What's most likely to cause a recession?

    2:38 - Where the U.S. economy currently stands

    4:29 - Thoughts from a microeconomist

    6:20 - How consumers play into today's economy

    9:06 - The role of political tension in the economy

    11:18 - Paul Jarley's final thoughts





     

    Episode Transcription

    Transcription coming soon!



    Listen to all episodes of "Is This Really a Thing?" at business.ucf.edu/podcast.

    • 12 min
    Is Change Management Really a Thing?

    Is Change Management Really a Thing?

    A lot of people don't really like change. But can they be coached or managed through the change process to understand and truly appreciate its benefits in the workplace? Guest host Thad Seymour, Interim President of UCF, introduces a panel of staff members from Addition Financial to discuss their recent re-brand initiative and what they learned from undergoing a massive, company-wide change.

     



    Featured Guests



    Thad Seymour, Ph.D. - Interim President, University of Central Florida

    Jordan George - Head of Leadership & Talent Development, Addition Financial

    Christina Lehman - Marketing Manager, Addition Financial

    Kerby Pickens - Manager of Leadership & Talent Development, Addition Financial



    Episode Highlights



    0:39 - Introduction from UCF Interim President Thad Seymour, Ph.D.

    2:26 - The difficulty of change within an organization

    8:22 - How to implement change

    16:27 - What makes people resistant to change?

    19:34 - "How Stella Saved the Farm"

    29:20 - Common mistakes to avoid as a leader

    40:27 - Addition Financial's experience with change

    46:36 - Thad Seymour's final thoughts





     

    Episode Transcription

    Jordan George:                 We're really excited to dive into this topic around changed management. Something that I know that you have overseen a lot in your time at UCF and certainly we're experiencing a lot internally right now with the name change from CFE to Addition Financial. Getting ready for an acquisition in the next couple of months here. So as we think about change and how disruptive it can be, why is effective change management so difficult?



    Paul Jarley:                         Well, the short answer is people don't like change. It's uncomfortable for them. But if you drill down into it, I think it comes down to a few things. If your change is very fundamental, a lot of people came to the organization, they were attracted to it maybe because of a specific mission or set of values or culture that you have. And if they see that change is threatening those things, they can have a very emotional reaction to that. People care deeply about those things. And they feel like they fit in an organization. And if they think that change threatens their fit with the organization, that can be a pretty traumatic experience for them.



    Paul Jarley:                         Secondly, organizations develop compensation systems and other kinds of reward systems that are in place to encourage the kinds of behaviors and outcomes that they want. And people know whether they're winning or losing under those systems. Or perhaps they've come to be comfortable with wherever they are kind of in the hierarchy of that system. And if those initially proposed change is going to threaten that they get pretty nervous about that. That's their livelihood, at one level, and that can be very disconcerting. Another real problem here is generally in a change process, the costs of the change are borne first by people. They're really well known and they're at a minimum irritating and maximum kind of threatening to their security. The benefits are all about the future. And those are kind of fuzzy and they're kind of unknown.



    Paul Jarley:                         So unless you have a change that's being motivated by something that's really compelling and urgent and threatens the entire organization, and it's just going to force a change, people tend to focus on the cost side of the change, rather than the benefit side of the change. If you're a leader in the organization, the hardest thing I think it is for a leader to do is to get people to see a future they have yet to experience. That's really, really difficult for people. And if they don't see that future experience as something that's going to benefit them persona

    • 49 min
    Are Good Deals Really a Thing?

    Are Good Deals Really a Thing?

    With new technology comes new ways to shop online and find a good deal, but retailers also have new tools at their disposal to charge customers higher prices. "Retail guru" Anand Krishnamoorthy discusses how retailers exploit consumers' lack of knowledge to charge higher prices and how shoppers can beat retailers at their own game this holiday season (and on Black Friday).

     



    Featured Guests



    Anand Krishnamoorthy - Associate Professor of Marketing, UCF College of Business



    Episode Highlights



    1:10 - Opaque Selling

    4:11 - Examples of opaque selling in the marketplace

    10:59 - The truth about "list prices"

    14:25 - The shopping experience and its influence

    19:51 - Price matching

    27:52 - The New York Times: Charging more for less?

    35:13 - Variable ticket pricing

    39:33 - Paul Jarley's final thoughts





     

    Episode Transcription

    Anand Krishnamoorthy:               This is something that many of us on the State side may not be familiar with. Eurowings is a German low cost flyer that doesn't even tell you what your destination will be, before you pay up. You will not know where you're flying to until you pay up.



    Paul Jarley:                         Here's a tip for value conscious holiday shoppers everywhere. You probably don't want to buy two tickets on that airline. This show is all about separating hype from fundamental change. I'm Paul Jarley, Dean of the College of Business here at UCF. I've got lots of questions. To get answers, I'm talking to people with interesting insights into the future of business. Have you ever wondered, "Is this really a thing?" Onto our show.



    Paul Jarley:                         Everybody knows that person who will go to great lengths to get a deal, but is a deal ever really a deal? We're bringing back our retail guru, Anand Krishnamoorthyorthy to explain to you that a deal, well, probably isn't really a thing. With pricing games, there's always a loser and Anand explains, that's usually you, listen in.



    Anand Krishnamoorthy:               What I'll do today is talk about three broad topics in pricing games. The first of which is what we refer to as opaque selling, where product attributes are hidden. Then we'll talk about where pricing cues are hidden. We'll start off with something that firms do a lot of, which is cost plus pricing. Some of you are familiar with this term, at least you've used it in the past, which is, you figured out your cost, tack on a markup, and then figure out your price based on that.



    Anand Krishnamoorthy:               Many firms practices, but if you ask them, they will not admit to it because it's a decidedly unsophisticated way to price. So why is it a problem? Let's start one, you're pricing based on things that consumers have no idea about. Consumers usually don't know what a firm's costs are. Even if they knew, why would you care? Why would a firm's production process of manufacturing plant factor into how much you'd be willing to pay?



    Anand Krishnamoorthy:               As a way of maybe channeling venture payroll's book, it's because costs don't care about consumer feelings. Costs are based off of things that consumers don't care about at all. It is consumers wanting benefits, consumers wanting other attributes, et cetera, rather than costs.



    Anand Krishnamoorthy:               To put it another way, if I'm inefficient, and I work for you and I take three days to do a job that you expect done in one, would you pay me three times as much? No. Then why would you expect firms to pay for consumers in terms of costs? Consumers do not want to compensate firms for their ineptitude, why would you expect cost to drive pricing?



    Anand Krishnamoorthy:               So then perhaps better ways to

    • 41 min
    Billionaires, Border Walls and Self-Driving Trucks: Are They Really a Thing?

    Billionaires, Border Walls and Self-Driving Trucks: Are They Really a Thing?

    Presidential candidates on both sides of the aisle point to a host of different factors for the state of the U.S. economy. With an economic recession on the way, renowned economist Glenn Hubbard joins UCF Business faculty John Solow, Sami Alpanda and Paul Jarley to discuss the hot topic of income inequality and when we can expect the current expansion to hit a wall. Is a recession really on our doorstep?

     



    Featured Guests



    Glenn Hubbard '79 - Economist; Chairman of the Board, MetLife Inc.

    John Solow - Kenneth White and James Xander Professor in Economics, UCF College of Business

    Sami Alpanda - Associate Professor, Economics, UCF College of Business



    Episode Highlights



    1:02 - Guest introductions

    3:02 - Rising income inequality

    7:24 -Technical disruption in the workplace

    15:54 - Politcal response to a changing economy

    21:00 - Trade wars

    25:35 - Rising healthcare and pharmaceutical costs

    29:46 - President Trump, politicians on the economy

    33:41 - Questions from the audience

    40:48 - Paul Jarley's final thoughts





     

    Episode Transcription

    Paul Jarley:                         The economy is a thing. The national election is a thing. But, the stuff politicians talk about on the way to Election Day? Well, those aren't always things. We've assembled a panel of experts. Listen up, people.



    Paul Jarley:                         This year was all about separating hype from fundamental change. I'm Paul Jarley, dean of the College of Business here at UCF. I've got lots of questions. To get answers, I'm talking to people with interesting insights into the future of business. Have you ever wondered, is this really a thing? On to our show.



    Paul Jarley:                         This podcast comes from an event where we were celebrating Glen Hubbard, and his gift to endow a professorship in economics. Listen in.



    Paul Jarley:                         I didn't want to resist the huge opportunity I had today to get together a panel to talk a little bit about the relationship between the economy and the political election that's coming up. So we're going to talk a little bit about whether a number of things are sort of a thing, or not in as non-political a way as we can here.



    Paul Jarley:                         I have three panelists with me today to help me understand some things. Most of you know Glenn Hubbard. What you may not know is Glenn Hubbard is a graduate of our economics department at UCF. He studied here. He is currently the chairman of the board of MetLife and is the former dean of the Columbia Business School. He is still a professor there, and I like to joke with Glenn, after you're a dean, the comment that you always make is you get to go back to be part of the problem, right, and then, the part of solution, and he's enjoying that a great deal.



    Glenn Hubbard:               Totally. Totally.



    Paul Jarley:                         Right now.



    Paul Jarley:                         Next to Glenn is John Solow. John is new to the college this year. He spent many years at Iowa. In fact, John and I were assistant professors together many, many years ago. And, he sits in the White, Xander endowed Professorship in Economics that Glenn and Glenn's wife, Constance, has funded.



    Glenn Hubbard:               [inaudible 00:02:01].



    Paul Jarley:                         And, it's not named after them. It's named after the two faculty members, who were most influential to Glenn while he was here becoming an economist. That's really awesome, and we're really glad to have John with us today.



    Paul Jarley:                         My last guest

    • 43 min

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