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Law School Lectures (audio) The University of Chicago

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    Sexing the Constitution: Getting to Gay Marriage?

    Sexing the Constitution: Getting to Gay Marriage?

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    In the 2015 Nora and Edward Ryerson Lecture, Geoffrey R. Stone, the Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago, explores historical attitudes to homosexuality, how laws discriminating against homosexuals first came to be seen as raising possible constitutional questions, and how the nation’s high court has come to the threshold of recognizing a constitutional right of same-sex couples to marry.

    • 1 tim. 8 min
    Cass R. Sunstein and “Simpler: The Future of Government”

    Cass R. Sunstein and “Simpler: The Future of Government”

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    As Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs for three years under the Obama administration, Cass R. Sunstein oversaw a far-reaching restructuring of America’s regulatory state. He discusses his book “Simpler: The Future of Government,” in which he pulls back the curtain to show what was done, how it works, and why government will never be the same again.

    • 52 min
    The Case Against Burden-Shifting Legal Exemptions

    The Case Against Burden-Shifting Legal Exemptions

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    The Western democratic practice to single out religious liberty for special treatment under the law is not in sync with the world we live in today, argues University of Chicago Law School professor Brian Leiter in his new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

    All people, both religious and non-religious, have certain kinds of beliefs about things they feel they absolutely must do, something he calls “claims of conscience.” In the book, Leiter, the Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence, explores whether there are good reasons behind the tendency to grant legal exemptions to religious claims of conscience while largely rejecting non-religious ones.

    • 2 min
    Addressing Liberty of Conscience

    Addressing Liberty of Conscience

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    The Western democratic practice to single out religious liberty for special treatment under the law is not in sync with the world we live in today, argues University of Chicago Law School professor Brian Leiter in his new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

    All people, both religious and non-religious, have certain kinds of beliefs about things they feel they absolutely must do, something he calls “claims of conscience.” In the book, Leiter, the Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence, explores whether there are good reasons behind the tendency to grant legal exemptions to religious claims of conscience while largely rejecting non-religious ones.

    • 2 min
    Why Tolerate Religion?

    Why Tolerate Religion?

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    The Western democratic practice to single out religious liberty for special treatment under the law is not in sync with the world we live in today, argues University of Chicago Law School professor Brian Leiter in his new book, Why Tolerate Religion?

    All people, both religious and non-religious, have certain kinds of beliefs about things they feel they absolutely must do, something he calls “claims of conscience.” In the book, Leiter, the Karl N. Llewellyn Professor of Jurisprudence, explores whether there are good reasons behind the tendency to grant legal exemptions to religious claims of conscience while largely rejecting non-religious ones.

    • 1 min.
    Healthcare Debate

    Healthcare Debate

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Todd Itami, rising third-year student in the University of Chicago Law School, moderates a debate on the constitutionality of President Obama’s healthcare program at an event on Monday, May 14, 2012 at the University of Chicago Law School. Over the course of an hour, Richard Epstein, James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Law at the University of Chicago Law School, and Andrew Koppelman, John Paul Stevens Professor of Law at Northwestern University Law School, debate the merits and flaws of the controversial healthcare program. The event was hosted by the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies.

    • 1 tim. 2 min

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