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Reconnect with the most powerful fuel of all – the fuel of loving your work. Best-selling author and award-winning designer David Kadavy helps you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Find your creative voice, cultivate the mindset you need to succeed, and be the first to capitalize on new opportunities to make a living making your art.

Every Thursday, David presents either a guest or his own learnings from his decade-plus career as a creative entrepreneur. Hear from titans of industry like former AOL CEO Steve Case. Hear from best-selling authors like Seth Godin and James Altucher. Hear from scientists, creators from dancers to a chef to a Hollywood set designer, and visionaries on the cutting edge of creative monetization – whether that's self publishing or blockchain technology.

Find out why Wall Street Journal best-selling author Jeff Goins says, "David is an underrated writer and thinker. In an age of instant publication, he puts time, effort and great thought into the content and work he shares with the world."

Find out why Basecamp CEO Jason Fried says David has "really good, deep questions, and original questions."

Subscribe to Love Your Work today so you never miss a dose of the inspiration and motivation you need to unleash the creator you already know you are, deep inside.

Love Your Work David Kadavy

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Reconnect with the most powerful fuel of all – the fuel of loving your work. Best-selling author and award-winning designer David Kadavy helps you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Find your creative voice, cultivate the mindset you need to succeed, and be the first to capitalize on new opportunities to make a living making your art.

Every Thursday, David presents either a guest or his own learnings from his decade-plus career as a creative entrepreneur. Hear from titans of industry like former AOL CEO Steve Case. Hear from best-selling authors like Seth Godin and James Altucher. Hear from scientists, creators from dancers to a chef to a Hollywood set designer, and visionaries on the cutting edge of creative monetization – whether that's self publishing or blockchain technology.

Find out why Wall Street Journal best-selling author Jeff Goins says, "David is an underrated writer and thinker. In an age of instant publication, he puts time, effort and great thought into the content and work he shares with the world."

Find out why Basecamp CEO Jason Fried says David has "really good, deep questions, and original questions."

Subscribe to Love Your Work today so you never miss a dose of the inspiration and motivation you need to unleash the creator you already know you are, deep inside.

    232. I Thought I Had Time Management All Figured Out, Then I Tried to Write a Book

    232. I Thought I Had Time Management All Figured Out, Then I Tried to Write a Book

    I used to be a time management enthusiast. I say “used to be,” because time management eventually stopped working for me.
    How I became an accidental author It all started with an email. It was the kind of email that would trip up most spam filters. I wasn’t being offered millions of dollars from an offshore bank account, true love, nor improved performance in bed. I was being offered a book deal.
    I had never thought of myself as a writer. In fact, I downright hated writing as a kid. I remember reading about how Stephen King said that when he was a kid, he was “on fire” to write. I remember saying to myself, That makes no sense! Who on Earth would enjoy writing?
    I had never thought of myself as a writer, but I had fantasized about being an author. I guess that means I didn’t think so much about writing, but I liked the idea of having written.
    As I considered taking this book deal, I talked to everyone I knew who had written a book. They all warned me that writing a book is extremely hard work, with little chance of success. One author simply said, You’ll want to die!
    But, I figured, how hard can it be? So, I signed my first literary contract.
    How I tried to write a book, when I didn’t know how to write a book I didn’t have any idea how to write a book, so I did it the only way I could think of: through brute force time management. I simply needed to find enough time to write this book.
    So, I used every time management technique I could think of. I put writing sessions on my calendar. I developed a morning routine that would get me writing first thing in the morning. I “time boxed” to try to limit the time I would spend on parts of the project. I fired my clients, I outsourced my meal preparation, I cancelled dates and turned down party invitations. I did everything I could to focus all of my time on writing my book.
    But it still wasn’t enough. I spent most of my day hunched over a keyboard. I felt actual physical pain in my stomach. It felt as if rigor mortis had taken over my fingers, as I struggled to write even a single sentence.
    Sure, I had the time to write my book, but I wasn’t getting anything done.
    My case of writers’ block was so bad that, a few weeks after signing my book deal, I accepted a last-minute invitation to go on a retreat to Costa Rica. With a signed contract in my file drawer and a deadline breathing down my neck, it wasn’t the most logical thing to do with my time. But I desperately hoped that a change of scenery would work some kind of magic on my writer’s block.
    But a few days into the trip, I still had nothing. Zero! Zilch! My contract said that if I didn’t have my manuscript twenty-five percent done within a few weeks, the deal was off. So, unless a miracle happened, I would write a check to the publisher to return my advance, and I would humiliatingly face my friends, family, and readers to tell them I had failed.
    Does that sound like a lot of pressure? It was.
    The chance encounter that changed the way I thought about writing productivity I wanted to feel sorry for myself, by myself, so I went for a walk. I was dragging my feet down the gravel road in Costa Rica, with my head hung down. How could I be so foolish?, I asked myself.
    Not only had I signed a contract to write a 50,000-word book, with little writing experience under my belt, I had wasted time and money going on this retreat.
    Just then, I heard someone call out. I looked up, and saw a man on the next road over waving big in my direction, with his entire arm, ¡¿Como estááááás?!
    I had noticed this man earlier in my walk. He was gripping onto the simple wires of a fence, leaning back in ecstasy, singing to himself. I had felt vaguely embarrassed for him, assuming he didn’t know someone else was around.
    I looked behind me, trying to figure out who he was waving at. But there was no o

    • 10 min
    231. Start Finishing: Charlie Gilkey

    231. Start Finishing: Charlie Gilkey

    Sometimes people tell me, “Hey David, The Heart to Start is a great book, but now that I’ve figured out how to start, how do I finish?!”
    If you’re anything like me, finishing is tough. You can always find a good reason not to finish what you’ve started. It’s not fun anymore, you don’t want to paint yourself into a corner if it goes well, or – my personal favorite – now you have an even better idea! (which you soon abandon, like the thousand projects before it.)
    Our guest today can help you stop floundering, and start finishing. In fact, he’s the author of a book called Start Finishing: How to Go from Idea to Done. He’s got all of the discipline of an Army officer, and all of the wisdom of a philosophy professor – he’s even been both of those things. He’s Charlie Gilkey (@CharlieGilkey). Whether you’re flip-flopping, floundering, or fluttering about from project to project like a butterfly in a botanical garden, Charlie can help you start finishing with his book, or start flourishing, with his podcast, Productive Flourishing.
    Today, we’ll talk about:
    Charlie says, “be courageous enough to commit more fully to fewer projects.” For lots of us, that’s easier said than done. Hear Charlie psychoanalyze me out of my own straitjacket. Finishing a big project changes who we are. How can you push past your comfort zone just when you’re about to make a transformation? You’ve heard of “fear of success.” I’ve always had trouble believing in it. But Charlie cleared it all up. Hear the four stories we tell ourselves that hold us back from success. P.S. Charlie is the last guest for awhile. Because I’m dedicating every ounce of creative energy to my upcoming book, Mind Management, Not Time Management. (Remember, the Preview Edition is available for a limited time.) I’ll still be workshopping ideas from the book in my bi-weekly essay episodes, so stay subscribed for those. Interestingly, since Charlie is all about finishing, and I’m on the home stretch for finishing this book, that makes him the perfect final guest.
    New Book: Mind Management, Not Time Management (Preview Edition) Read my upcoming book months before anyone else. Grab it, for a limited time, here.
    About Your Host, David Kadavy David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast, his Love Mondays newsletter, and self-publishing coaching David helps you make it as a creative.
    Follow David on:
    Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Support the show on Patreon Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »
     
     
    Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/charlie-gilkey/

    • 55 min
    230. Grippy & Slippy

    230. Grippy & Slippy

    One day, I was in a coworking space, here in Colombia, writing in my Moleskine notebook. One of the other co-workers came up to me and asked me a question.
    He said, in Spanish, and with a sense of earnest curiosity, “Why are you writing in your notebook? Your computer is right in front of you. You can write much faster on your computer. Why aren’t you writing on your computer?”
    That question really stuck with me, because I thought the answer was obvious -- though I guess it wasn’t.
    And it got me thinking about the tools we use to create, and why we use them.
    Creativity is hard You already know, from listening to episode 218 about the Four Stages of Creativity, that we don’t solve creative problems all at once. We need to go through stages. We need to go through Preparation, learning about the problem. From there, the problem goes through Incubation. Our subconscious works on it while we do something else. Only then can we reach Illumination -- our “aha” moment. Finally, to get it ready to ship, we need to go through Verification.
    And you also know, from being a human being, that when you’re up against a really tough problem, anything in the world suddenly becomes more appealing than that problem.
    You’ll get “shiny object syndrome,” and want to escape to another project. Or you’ll check social media. I even find that I sometimes procrastinate on a really tough project by working on a slightly less tough project, that I have been procrastinating on until now.
    Ayn Rand called it “white tennis shoes syndrome.” That if she came up against a tough problem while writing, she’d suddenly remember that there were some white tennis shoes in the closet that had smudges on them, and needed to be cleaned. Distractions, it seems, are nothing new.
    Choose the tool for the creative job But, I’ve found, depending upon where you are in the Four Stages of Creativity, the tool you use can make all of the difference in whether you keep moving forward, or fall off the tracks.
    Through lots of trial and error, I have collected for myself the perfect arsenal of different tools for different situations. Here are some of them.
    First thing in the morning, I write, with my eyes still closed, while still in bed, on my AlphaSmart. It’s a portable word processor. Discontinued. Available used on Amazon for about forty bucks.
    I do my morning writing session on an iPad, with a wired external keyboard.
    I have multiple 9” x 12” whiteboards lying around the house. I jot down ideas when they come to me. Sometimes I’ll even take a whiteboard to a cafe and write on it in long form.
    Then, I have my 6” x 9” Moleskine Classic notebook. I also carry with me everywhere the tiniest notebook I could find: the Moleskine Volant, which is 2.5” x 4”.
    And, of course, I have an iPhone SE, on which I occasionally brainstorm, if there’s no better tool around.
    Sometimes, I even find it useful to simply pace around and talk out loud.
    Finally, there’s plain, old-fashioned thinking. Just sitting in the park or swinging in my hammock, trying to navigate the twists and turns of a problem in my own mind.
    Oops, I almost forgot. I also have a laptop. I try to avoid using it, but sometimes I simply need to be on a full-blown computer.
    Some tools are slippy, some tools are grippy Some of these tools are “slippy.” Some of these tools are “grippy.”
    Slippy tools are tools are efficient. There’s little friction. You can create your final product quickly with a slippy tool.
    Grippy tools are inefficient. There’s lots of friction. You can’t create your final product quickly with a grippy tool. Often, you can’t create your final product at all with a grippy tool.
    Slippy tools sound great, but they have a drawback: Because slippy tools are so powerful, you can more easily get distracted. Yes, I can type fast and sw

    • 14 min
    229. FOMO: Get the Good & Miss Out on the Bad – Patrick McGinnis

    229. FOMO: Get the Good & Miss Out on the Bad – Patrick McGinnis

    Offer expires soon. You don’t want to miss it! It’s the investment of a lifetime! It’s going to be the party of the century!
    Can you feel the anxiety piling up? You know what it is – it’s FOMO. The Fear of Missing Out. In a hyper-connected world, FOMO is more intense than ever.
    Our friends are sharing amazing travel photos on Instagram, people are talking about the hot new investment opportunity on Twitter, news headlines bait us with the mystery of what we’ll find out if only we’d click.
    Even social distancing isn’t enough to calm FOMO. Sure, you have little choice but to stay home, but then you see the screenshot of the Zoom party you weren’t invited to.
    Having a fear of missing out is an innately human thing – it’s been around forever. But FOMO is relatively new. In fact the term FOMO – so ubiquitous it’s in the dictionary – was invented in 2004, by today’s guest, Patrick McGinnis.
    Patrick McGinnis (@pjmcginnis) is the author of Fear of Missing Out: Practical Decision-Making in a World of Overwhelming Choice. When Patrick invented FOMO, he was a student at Harvard Business School – a choice-rich environment. More than fifteen years later, Patrick still thinks about the dark side and the bright side of FOMO – as a venture capitalist.
    If you’re going to love your work, you have to make great decisions. That’s what this conversation will help you do.
    There’s more to FOMO than you think. In this episode, you’ll learn:
    How can FOMO be a good thing? If you’re feeling the FOMO, it might be a sign. With all the lip service FOMO gets, it’s a shame more people don’t think about FOMO’s cousin: FOBO. What is FOBO, and why is it all bad? FOMO and FOBO can wipe out your mental energy with decision fatigue. Learn a quick and fun hack for saving brain cycles called “ask the watch.” You’ll love it. P.S. Patrick McGinnis is one of the last guests we’ll have on Love Your Work for awhile. Why? Because I’m dedicating every ounce of creative energy to my upcoming book, Mind Management, Not Time Management. (Remember, the Preview Edition is available for a limited time. I’ll still be workshopping ideas from the book in my bi-weekly essay episodes, so stay subscribed for those.
    You don’t want to miss this conversation. If you do, you’ll regret it!
    New Book: Mind Management, Not Time Management (Preview Edition) Read my upcoming book months before anyone else. Grab it, for a limited time, here.
    About Your Host, David Kadavy David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast, his Love Mondays newsletter, and self-publishing coaching David helps you make it as a creative.
    Follow David on:
    Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Support the show on Patreon Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »
     
     
    Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/patrick-mcginnis-fomo/

    • 44 min
    228. 11 Simple Ways to Be 100x More Effective Than Most People

    228. 11 Simple Ways to Be 100x More Effective Than Most People

    To get exceptional results, you need to do exceptional things.
    Most things that are normal are normal only because very few people can resist them.
    Just because it’s normal, doesn’t mean it’s good for you. It often means the opposite.
    It’s like the Ancient Chinese proverb says, “If five million people do a foolish thing, it is still a foolish thing.”
    Don’t let them get a piece of you If you want to carve out your unique place in this world, you need to rise above the noise that other people succumb to.
    Which means that you have to ruthlessly eliminate the self-destructive things that most people do.
    The economy runs, like a flywheel, off of exploiting our weaknesses. Sell us addictive and unhealthy substances, then you can sell us drugs to treat the diseases they cause. Hold our attention with news that convinces us we can’t trust one another, then you can sell us suburban developments and home security systems. Then there’s even more attention leftover to sell to advertisers because our social isolation makes us bored and lonely.
    Getting us to do things that aren’t good for us is great for the Growth Domestic Product.
    We’re so vulnerable to these things that if you can cut out the things that break you down, and replace them with the things that build you up, you can be way more effective than most people.
    I say you could be one hundred times more effective than most people.
    Here are eleven things you can do to be one hundred times more effective than most people.
    Before I go further, I want to acknowledge that this list really pisses some people off. I posit that it threatens their self-perception.
    I’m not saying you’re a bad person if you do or don’t do these things. I’m saying you’d be better off if you did all of these things. Let’s be honest -- it’s darn near impossible to do all of these things. I know I don’t. This is just the list I aspire to.
    Also, some people hear this list and think it sounds like a boring life. I would encourage those people to get a life -- I’ll explain at the end of this episode.
    Okay, on with the list.
    1. No sugar Sugar is an addictive substance. Sugar stimulates dopamine, and the more dopamine you stimulate, the more dopamine you need in order to feel stimulated. If you want to hear more about that, listen to Robert Lustig in episode 186. It is downright criminal how much sugar surrounds us every day. The last time I was in a hospital, the only things in the vending machine were products filled with sugar -- in a hospital.
    2. No alcohol Again, why is this normal? Just look at how many bars and liquor stores are on every city street. At some point in my 20’s I realized that each Saturday night I was regularly spending the equivalent an entire working day going from bar to bar -- not to mention the way that drinking affected me the next day (and likely throughout the week). You can accomplish a lot if you cut out alcohol.
    I’m lucky enough to not be addicted to alcohol, but economist Tyler Cowen shared an interesting perspective on this podcast: that alcohol is so harmful to much of the population -- those who are addicted to alcohol -- that the only responsible thing to do is to not drink, so it won’t be such a normal thing anymore.
    3. No caffeine This one is hard for the coffee lovers. Caffeine, again, is an addictive substance. What happens when you’re addicted to something? You don’t use it, it uses you.
    The more caffeine you use, the more caffeine you need, until you simply can’t get enough. Many people don’t realize that their caffeine use is at the root of other conditions, such as anxiety, depression, high blood pressure, even schizophrenia.
    Additionally, using caffeine, even in the morning, can reduce the quality of your sleep that night -- whether you know it or not.
    4. 8 hours of sleep a night Speaking of sleep

    • 12 min
    227. Ari Meisel: More Productivity, Less Doing

    227. Ari Meisel: More Productivity, Less Doing

    Ari Meisel (@arimeisel) created a productivity system out of necessity. He was suffering from a chronic and life-threatening illness that was so severe, he had no choice but to make the most out of every ounce of energy he had.
    He took everything in his life and he applied what he now calls “OAO.” He Optimized, Automated, and Outsourced everything he could. Through his own system, which is now called Less Doing, he was able to track the symptoms of his illness, and what triggered those symptoms.
    This helped Ari work his way to a clean bill of health. He eventually competed in an Ironman competition.
    I talked to Ari several years ago, after I first discovered the Less Doing system. That webinar conversation is available to Patreon backers of certain levels.
    Now, as I am working on my next book, Mind Management, Not Time Management, I wanted to talk to Ari again. I realize that so much of what I’ve learned and developed over the past several years is built upon what I learned from Ari’s Less Doing system.
    If you’re going to love your work, you have to do less of what doesn’t matter, and more of what does matter.
    In this conversation, you’ll learn:
    Why does OAO – Optimize, Automate, and Outsource – have to be done in order. Avoid the common mistakes people make when they try to “scale up” broken systems? Ari says there are deep-seated psychological reasons behind why we procrastinate. What are some of those reasons? You might learn something surprising about yourself. You’ve heard me talk about weekly routines instead of daily routines on the podcast before. We’ll dig deep into how Ari organizes his three-day, fifteen-hour work week. For example, why is Thursday his content day? Photo: TechCrunch
    My Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays
    About Your Host, David Kadavy David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast, his Love Mondays newsletter, and self-publishing coaching David helps you make it as a creative.
    Follow David on:
    Twitter Instagram Facebook YouTube Subscribe to Love Your Work Apple Podcasts Overcast Spotify Stitcher RSS Email Support the show on Patreon Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »
     
     
    Shownotes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/ari-meisel/

    • 49 min

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Boukjan ,

Good work!

Keeps me motivating to develop myself.

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