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In a continued effort to provide relevant, interesting and engaging programming to our statewide audience, MPB Think Radio provides Mississippi Edition, a weekday news magazine program. Mississippi Edition, hosted by Karen Brown, features the latest news of the day and interviews with the people who are making the news themselves.
The program not only provides Mississippi news but also addresses the ways that national and world news affects our state. Join Karen Brown as she shares the latest on Mississippi news, culture, and current events.

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Mississippi Edition MPB Think Radio

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In a continued effort to provide relevant, interesting and engaging programming to our statewide audience, MPB Think Radio provides Mississippi Edition, a weekday news magazine program. Mississippi Edition, hosted by Karen Brown, features the latest news of the day and interviews with the people who are making the news themselves.
The program not only provides Mississippi news but also addresses the ways that national and world news affects our state. Join Karen Brown as she shares the latest on Mississippi news, culture, and current events.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    8/14/20 - Absentee Voting Lawsuit | Poor People's Campaign | Book Fest 2020

    8/14/20 - Absentee Voting Lawsuit | Poor People's Campaign | Book Fest 2020

    The Mississippi Center for Justice files suit against the Secretary of State's office over the issue of absentee voting ahead of the November General Election.
    Then, a movement to unite communities of poverty across the country turns it's efforts to key Senate races in the South.
    Plus, the coronavirus pandemic is changing how the 2020 Mississippi Book Festival looks. We talk to the festival's Literary Director about how book-lovers can access this year's content.
    Segment 1:
    A new lawsuit seeks to ensure Mississippians who are concerned about voting in-person because of the coronavirus pandemic can do so by absentee ballot in November. The Mississippi Center for Justice and the American Civil Liberties Union argue in the suit that the state's absentee ballot law is confusing - citing language added by the legislature during the pandemic. They're asking a judge to clarify that all voters who follow public health guidance to avoid contracting COVID-19 may vote by absentee ballot in the fall elections. Rob McDuff is a lawyer with the Mississippi Center for Justice. He shares more about the lawsuit with our Ashley Norwood.
    Segment 2:
    A campaign inspired by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s last organizing effort says new data suggest low-income voters in key states could swing some U.S. Senate races - including the 2020 contest between Republican incumbent Cindy Hyde-Smith and challenger Mike Espy. The Poor People's Campaign, a coalition of activists and union and religious leaders, says it's using the data from a study by the Columbia School of Social Work to pressure candidates to focus on the systemic issue of poverty in places like the South. The Reverend Dr. William Barber II is a co-founder of the Poor People's Campaign
    Segment 3:
    Since 2015, the Mississippi Book Festival, a nonprofit founded by literacy advocates, has drawn thousands to the State Capitol grounds. But this year, things will be different for the sixth edition of the "literary lawn party". Due to the coronavirus pandemic, this year's festival will be all-virtual, with a wide variety of digital content today launching today. Ellen Rogers Daniels is the festival's Literary Director. She tells us how book-lovers can access this year's content.

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    • 23 min
    8/13/20 - Vaccine Trials in Hattiesburg | Lt. Governor Hosemann | Book Club: Ace Atkins

    8/13/20 - Vaccine Trials in Hattiesburg | Lt. Governor Hosemann | Book Club: Ace Atkins

    A coronavirus vaccine undergoes clinical trials in a Mississippi city. We examine what the trials will tell us about fighting the pandemic and how soon it could be available.
    Then, the Lt. Governor reflects on the legislature's efforts in the shortened return to the Capitol.
    Plus, in today's Book Club, author Ace Atkins with his latest Quinn Colson crime novel, The Revelators. 
    Segment 1:
    A Mississippi clinic is taking part in groundbreaking research to find a vaccine for COVID-19. Hattiesburg Clinic is joining 88 other research locations nationwide in a study to test the effectiveness of a potential COVID-19 vaccine developed by the biotechnology company Moderna. The clinical trial aims to test 500 Mississippians, and 30 thousand people nationwide over the coming months. Dr. Rambod Rouhbakhsh [Ram-Bod Roo-Bosh] is Principal Investigator for MediSync Clinical Research at Hattiesburg Clinic. He shares more about the clinic's role in the trials with our Kobee Vance. 
    Segment 2:
    It has been an unusual first legislative session for first-term Lt' Governor Delbert Hosemann. The coronavirus shut down the capitol in March during the early days of the pandemic - putting a halt in the legislative calendar. Then came a clash with Governor Tate Reeves over which branch of state government would carry the power to appropriate over a billion dollars in CARES Act relief funds. The summer months saw lawmakers vote to suspend rules in order to introduce a bill to retire the 1894 state flag. Shortly after, Hosemann and at least 30 other lawmakers contracted COVID-19.  
    This week, legislative leaders, including Hosemann, called members of both chambers back to do something not done since 2002 - override a Governor's veto. The Lt. Governor reflects on the two days back at the capitol with our Desare Frazier.
    Segment 3:
    Oxford Mississippi author, Ace Atkins, offers a new Quinn Colson novel. The Revelators pits the Mississippi sheriff against a criminal syndicate that has ravaged his community and tried to have him killed. But, as Atkins tells us, it isn't only readers who have taken notice of his most notable character.

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    • 25 min
    8/12/20 - College Football | Lawmakers Respond to Veto Override | Southern Remedy Health Minute | Biloxi Superintendent

    8/12/20 - College Football | Lawmakers Respond to Veto Override | Southern Remedy Health Minute | Biloxi Superintendent

    The Governor throws his support behind a fall college football season.
    Then, lawmakers respond to the first veto override since 2002.
    Plus, after a Southern Remedy Health Minute, cases of COVID-19 are popping up in schools. We talk to a superintendent on the coast about how his district has managed the first week of school.
    Segment 1:
    For many in the south, fall means football. But that reality could be shattered as two of college football's premiere conferences are suspending athletic activities. The Big 10 and Pac 12 both announced yesterday their member schools would not be participating in fall sports due to concerns over the coronavirus. The Southeastern Conference - home of Mississippi State University and the University of Mississippi - has modified its football schedule, but has not yet announced any plans to suspend play. Governor Tate Reeves says football can and should be played.
    Segment 2:
    Governor Tate Reeves is claiming victory after his veto of the education budget bill was overridden earlier this week. It was the first veto override since 2002. Reeves says he vetoed the bill to compel lawmakers to fund the School Recognition Program. Representative Kent McCarty, a Republican from Hattiesburg, serves as Vice Chair of the House Education Committee. He tells our Desare Frazier lawmakers felt it prudent to return to address the veto. Senate Minority Leader Derrick Simmons calls the override historic. He says legislators responded overwhelmingly to educators concerns.
    Segment 3:
    Southern Remedy Health Minute
    Segment 4:
    Around 100 students at a Mississippi Gulf Coast high school are quarantining after a teacher reported COVID-19 like symptoms. District administrators say the Gulfport High School students were sent home out of an abundance of caution. The episode is one in a handful of examples of what the new normal like is for school communities. In neighboring city Biloxi, students returned to class last week. Biloxi Public Schools Superintendent Marcus Boudreaux says its been a great start to the year, even as students adapt to new policies designed to prevent school-wide transmission.

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    • 25 min
    8/11/20 - Veto Override & Unemployment Benefits | Pediatric Cases Rise | Constitutionality of Executive Orders

    8/11/20 - Veto Override & Unemployment Benefits | Pediatric Cases Rise | Constitutionality of Executive Orders

    The House overrides a budget bill veto and the Governor weighs in on President Trumps Executive Order on unemployment benefits.
    Then, over 97,000 pediatric cases of COVID-19 were reported during the second half of July. We examine the factors of pediatric transmission.
    Plus, President Trump issued a series of Executive Orders over the weekend, including a payroll tax deferment. But how constitutional are they?
    Segment 1:
    Mississippi Legislators are making their voices heard by overriding Governor Tate Reeves' veto of an education budget bill. Reeves said he vetoed parts of the bill because it changed a teacher pay bonus program. The House voted 109-7 in favor of the bill. The Senate, likewise, voted by a two-thirds margin to override the veto. Governor Reeves responded to the lawmakers' action yesterday during a press briefing. 
    As mitigation efforts against the coronavirus continue, attention is also on the widespread unemployment caused by the pandemic. While the numbers have improved slightly in recent months, many Mississippians are still jobless. Exacerbating that condition is the expiration of the $600 federal supplement of unemployment benefits. With Congress deadlocked on a solution, President Trump issued an Executive Order under the Stafford Act to provide continued assistance. But, as Reeves explains, the added benefits could put undue strain on the state's Unemployment Security Trust Fund.
    Segment 2:
    Nationwide, over 97,000 pediatric cases were reported in the second half of July - setting the stage for an uncertain fall semester as school administrators plan for the pandemic. Dr. John Gaudet is the President of the Mississippi Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. He discusses the rapid increase in pediatric cases, and the factors that lead to transmission in older children.
    Segment 3:
    Congress is currently deadlocked in negotiations for pandemic relief bill. Democrats are reportedly seeking a three trillion dollar package while Republican leaders want to cap the bill at one trillion. While talks stall, President Donald Trump is using the power of the Executive Order to present relief options - including a continuation of the federal unemployment supplement and a payroll tax deferment. Matt Steffey, Professor at Mississippi College School of Law answers the fundamental question: are they constitutional?


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    • 24 min
    8/10/20 - Lawmakers Plan to Return | Hospital Surge | Testing in Holmes County

    8/10/20 - Lawmakers Plan to Return | Hospital Surge | Testing in Holmes County

    Lawmakers return to the capital to address the Governor’s education budget bill veto and other matters.
    Then, nearly two weeks after soaring highs in COVID-19 case numbers, lagging indicators like hospitalizations and ICU occupancy are catching up to the hospital system. We hear how the the state’s only Tier One trauma hospital is preparing.
    Plus, the CDC and Health Department visit Holmes County for a widespread community testing initiative.
    Segment 1:
    Lawmakers are expected to return to the Mississippi capitol today to handle some unfinished
    business. The legislature adjourned early last month, sending a number of bills to the desk of Governor Tate Reeves for signature. Reeves would end up vetoing some of them, including the education budget bill - now at the center of a lawsuit between lawmakers and the Governor.
    Leaders reserved six days of the regular session to return - in order to appropriate the remainder of the CARES Act funds. But soon after dismissing, at least 40 capital personnel tested positive for COVID-19, creating uncertainty as to when members would be able to return to address the series of vetoes. Reeves has said he would not call the legislature back into session until he feels it is safe. Robert Johnson is the Democratic Leader in the House. He tells our Desare Frazier the lawmakers' return is necessary right now.
    Segment 2:
    Mississippi’s seven-day rolling average of coronavirus infections is trending down following a month of the state’s highest rates of community transmission. But the data suggests the worst could still be yet to come for those lagging indicators like hospitalizations, ICU occupancy, and ventilator utilization - all of which remain at or near their highest levels. Dr. LouAnn Woodward is the Vice Chancellor of Health Services at the University of Mississippi Medical Center - the state’s sole Tier I trauma facility. She tells our Michael Guidry those record high case numbers from two weeks ago are just starting to manifest in the hospital data.
    Segment 3:
    Holmes County is a major hotspot for the coronavirus in Mississippi, despite having a relatively small population. Now, a partnership between the Mississippi Department of Health, CDC, National Guard and University of Mississippi Medical Center is working to test every resident in the town of Lexington for the coronavirus. State Health Officer Dr. Thomas Dobbs says he hopes this focused testing initiative can slow the spread of the virus by catching asymptomatic carriers.

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    • 24 min
    8/7/20 - ICE Raid Executives Indicted | Qualified Immunity Opinion | Millsaps AD Aaron Pelch

    8/7/20 - ICE Raid Executives Indicted | Qualified Immunity Opinion | Millsaps AD Aaron Pelch

    One year after the immigration raids that shook Mississippi communities, the U.S. Attorney’s Office issues indictments against processing plant management.
    Then, a Mississippi judge’s opinion on qualified immunity scrutinizes a practice that has shielded law enforcement officers.
    Plus, member institutions of the NCAA’s Division III won’t be playing sports this fall. We talk to the A.D. of one of Mississippi’s D-3 schools.
    Segment 1:
    One year ago today, agents from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement raided seven central Mississippi chicken processing plants, detaining over 600 undocumented workers. It was the largest single-state raid in American history. Now, the U.S. Attorney's office is holding management of those plants accountable through indictments against four plant executives. MPB's Desare Frazier talks with U.S. Attorney Mike Hurst.
    Segment 2:
    "Clarence Jamison wasn't jaywalking. He wasn't outside playing with a toy gun. He didn't look like a "suspicious person". He wasn't suspected of "selling loose, untaxed cigarettes". He wasn't suspected of passing a counterfeit $20 bill." Those are the first five lines of U.S. District Judge Carlton Reeves' opinion upholding a claim of qualified immunity for officer Nick McClendon. Reeves gives 19 different examples of what Jamison, a Black man, wasn't doing when he was pulled over by McClendon - each example invoking the memory of other Black men and women whose lives were ended through excessive police force. Reeves further opined the "qualified immunity" doctrine operates like absolute immunity in real life.
    But based on legal precedent, Reeves was compelled to uphold the doctrine. Jarvis Dortch is the Executive Director of the Mississippi Chapter of the ACLU. He shares his thoughts on Reeve's opinion with our Kobee Vance.
    Segment 3:
    College sports in the NCAA's two lower levels won't take place this fall. On Wednesday the Presidents Councils for the governing body's Divisions II and III announced they would cancel fall championships for the 2020-2021 seasons. This decision means Mississippi's member schools like Mississippi College, Delta State, and Belhaven will have to re-imagine what their sports calendars will look like as they adjust plans to potentially play fall sports in the spring. Aaron Pelch is the Athletic Director of Millsaps College, a NCAA D-3 school. He says schools are awaiting guidance from the NCAA regarding what possibilities exist for fall sports. He shares his plans and reaction to the decision with us.


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    • 25 min

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