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The Ocean is important to all life, including yours.

Welcome to the video collection of the Smithsonian's Ocean Portal – a unique, interactive online experience that inspires awareness, understanding, and stewardship of the world’s Ocean, developed by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History and more than 20 collaborating organizations.

For more ocean news, visit the Ocean Portal at www.ocean.si.edu!

Ocean Science Smithsonian, National Museum of Natural History

    • Vetenskap

The Ocean is important to all life, including yours.

Welcome to the video collection of the Smithsonian's Ocean Portal – a unique, interactive online experience that inspires awareness, understanding, and stewardship of the world’s Ocean, developed by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History and more than 20 collaborating organizations.

For more ocean news, visit the Ocean Portal at www.ocean.si.edu!

    • video
    Marine Ecologist Jeremy Jackson Discusses Oil Spills

    Marine Ecologist Jeremy Jackson Discusses Oil Spills

    Marine ecologist Dr. Jeremy Jackson and a team of researchers conducted an in-depth study of the effects of a 1986 oil spill on the coast of Panama. In this video, Dr. Jackson discusses the study, its lessons for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and major threats to the ocean today. More about the Gulf oil spill can be found in our Gulf oil spill featured story.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Oil’s Impact on Marine Invertebrates

    Oil’s Impact on Marine Invertebrates

    In the aftermath of the Gulf oil spill, what is the effect of oil on invertebrates like jellyfish, clams, crabs, sea stars, and plankton? The scope of the damage is more easily observed among birds and large animals, but Dr. Chris Mah, an invertebrate zoologist at Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, suggests that what we don’t see may be more widespread and devastating. To learn more about sea stars, urchins, brittle stars, sea cucumbers, feather stars, and other spiny skinned animals, visit the Ocean Portal at www.ocean.si.edu.

    • 2 min
    • video
    Witness to a Plastic Invasion

    Witness to a Plastic Invasion

    Blog entry: It blew in for two solid days: a flotilla of plastic forks, soda bottles, rubber gloves, and other refuse. I tried to pick everything up off the beach, but when I turned around, you couldn’t tell that I had cleaned at all. When we went out in the boats, we had to go slowly in order to dodge the debris. Eventually the tide came in and swooped it all away.

    I was at the Smithsonian Marine Research Station on Carrie Bow, a small island on the southern end of Belize. My colleagues and I discussed where the garbage could be coming from. This area is very remote and the trash was blowing in from the open ocean. Based on the wood and pumice (volcanic rock that floats) that was mixed in with the plastics, our best guess was that a heavy rainstorm washed the debris into the ocean.

    On the way back from a short dive, to collect some data, I approached a mass of plastic floating in the water. I still had plenty of air in my tank and battery time on the video camera, so I dropped into the water and sunk below the debris.

    From underneath, it looked like a huge, swirling monster. The bright colors of the plastic were backlit from the sun above. I swam up to the trash slowly and shoved my camera straight into it. Underwater photography is difficult because everything moves: the subject and the shooter. Once I was inside this swirling mass of trash, I concentrated solely on trying to stay steady.

    It was only later that I was able to really see what I filmed. I was struck by the contents – all items I personally use at home and mostly plastics. I tried to think of how I could rid my house of plastic. I even contemplated buying a cow (so I would never need to buy another plastic container of milk or yogurt).

    This experience transformed me in ways that I hope watching this video will transform you. I now see plastics everywhere and try to avoid them. I have plasticware in my house, but I reuse it. If I see plastic trash on the street, I go out of my way to pick it up. No, that is not my plastic water bottle rolling around on the sidewalk, but I will pick it up because it is my planet.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Trash on the Beach and in the Ocean

    Trash on the Beach and in the Ocean

    While conducting field work in Curaçao in 2011, Smithsonian researchers encountered trash along remote beaches and deep in the water column. This video gives a brief glimpse of some of the marine debris they found.

    • 1 min.
    • video
    Live Video of New Eel Protanguilla Palau

    Live Video of New Eel Protanguilla Palau

    This video shows the a live image of the new eel (Protanguilla palau). This research was published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B in the paper: A 'living fossil' eel (Anguilliformes: Protoanguillidae, fam nov) from an undersea cave in Palau by G. David Johnson, Hitoshi Ida, Jiro Sakaue, Tetsuya Sado, Takashi Asahida and Masaki Miya

    • 1 min.
    • video
    Ocean Odyssey Windows into the Ocean at the National Museum of Natural History

    Ocean Odyssey Windows into the Ocean at the National Museum of Natural History

    Take a deep breath and enjoy a sneak peek at the high-definition film by Feodor Pitcairn that will transport you into the realm beneath the waves.
    Can't get enough of the ocean? Check out the Smithsonian's Ocean Portal at ocean.si.edu!

    • 1 min.

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