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David L. Gray is a Catholic Theologian, Author, and Humorist offering commentary on the liturgy of the Catholic Mass, Theology, Current Events, Culture, and Society from a faithfully and courageously Catholic perspective.

This feed includes older versions of his podcasting journey that started back in 2011; first with 'A Conversation on the Spiritual Life with David L. Gray (Yoseph Daviyd)' and 'The David L. Gray Show'. Those installations were primarily interviews.

Today, 'Talking Catholic with David L. Gray is primarily a monologue consisting of original podcast content on the 'liturgical sense' of the Scriptures, crossover content from YouTube videos, and shared interviews of David L. Gray from other shows.

Talking Catholic with David L. Gray David L. Gray

    • Kristendom

David L. Gray is a Catholic Theologian, Author, and Humorist offering commentary on the liturgy of the Catholic Mass, Theology, Current Events, Culture, and Society from a faithfully and courageously Catholic perspective.

This feed includes older versions of his podcasting journey that started back in 2011; first with 'A Conversation on the Spiritual Life with David L. Gray (Yoseph Daviyd)' and 'The David L. Gray Show'. Those installations were primarily interviews.

Today, 'Talking Catholic with David L. Gray is primarily a monologue consisting of original podcast content on the 'liturgical sense' of the Scriptures, crossover content from YouTube videos, and shared interviews of David L. Gray from other shows.

    The Solemnity of Christ the King (34th Sunday OT) Year C

    The Solemnity of Christ the King (34th Sunday OT) Year C

    Thirty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time



    2 Samuel 5:1-3 Colossians 1:12-20 Luke 23:35-43



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    According to our liturgical calendar,
    today is the last and 34th Sunday in Ordinary Time and the close of
    another liturgical year. Beginning next Sunday, we will begin our procession
    through Advent and into the Christ Mass. It is something beautiful to consider
    that right before we turn our attention to the infancy narratives of Christ Jesus,
    we pause to reflect on the inheritance of His Kingship and on our dependence on
    Him as our King.



    The
    First Reading today for the Solemnity of Christ the King comes from Second Samuel 5:1-3, and is
    filled with beautiful, covenantal, and prophetic language. Chapter five,
    concerning the anointing of David to be King of all of Israel, opens up with
    all the tribes of Israel coming to David in the city of Hebron and saying “Here
    we are, your bone and your flesh.” This is creation, covenantal, and sacramental
    language. It sounds like what Adam exclaimed when it first saw his bride, “This
    one, at last is bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh; this one shall be
    called Woman.” The People of Israel identifying with their new king in this way
    signals that they belong to him and him to them. Another example of covenantal language
    is in the next verse when Tribes recount what God had done for them through
    David and how he was chosen by God, not them, in the way same that a father
    would repeat the Haggadah on the
    night of the Passover to remind his family what God has done His people through
    Abraham and Moses and that they could not save themselves – God needed to miraculous
    step into creation for them to be saved. Here they say, “In days past, when
    Saul was our king, it was you who led the Israelites out and brought them back.
    And the LORD said to you, ‘You shall shepherd my people Israel and shall be
    commander of Israel.'” Yet, David has a choice to participate in this
    calling. He could reject this tribal and earthly kingship, just as Jesus would
    in centuries to come, but he does not. He accepts the call of God upon his life
    and on that day, before the Lord, he made a covenant with the Tribes to be their
    King and they anointed him as such; David the King of Israel. In verse four the
    text informs us that David was only thirty-years-old when he began his reign, which,
    tradition informs us, was the same age when Jesus would begin His earthly
    ministry.



    David being anointed King of Israel
    should not only call us into understanding how the promise of God to give
    Israel a King forever is perfectly fulfilled Christ Jesus, the King of Heaven
    and Earth, but should also remind of our own inheritance and anointing that we
    received through the liturgy on the day we were anointed with the sacred chrism
    oil of Baptism. On that day, our anointing by the Holy Spirit incorporated us
    into Christ who was anointed priest, prophet, and king. Through Him, we
    participate in this threefold office in the world and fulfill in another way
    the promise of God to give His People their King forever through the seed of
    David who came as the bone of our bone and flesh of our flesh, but also as God.




    The
    Second Reading from Colossians
    1:12-20 contains an early confessional and creedal hymn of the Church, beginning
    in verse 15. This hymn should remind every Catholic of the truths we confess
    in the Gloria in Excelsis Deo and in the Creeds about who Christ Jesus is and of
    His role in creation and in salvation history.



    Reminiscent of our confession about Christ in the Nicene-Constantinople Creed and in the opening of the Gospel of John, the first stanza of this hymn (vv. 15-17), declares that Christ’s dominion as King encompasses the entire cosmo

    • 12 min
    Through the Liturgy is How We Keep on Keeping on (33rd Sunday OT) Year C

    Through the Liturgy is How We Keep on Keeping on (33rd Sunday OT) Year C

    Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time



    Malachi 3:19-20A 2 Thessalonians 3:7-12 Luke 21:5-19



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    The First Reading at the Divine Symphony today for the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time from Malachi 3:19-20A is better contextualized if we begin at v. 13 where we read about the Lord critiquing His People’s disappointment. They are disappointed in living this life; treating it as a funeral, because there does not seem to be an immediate gain in this life by serving God and obeying His laws. It is frustrating to them that they see the “arrogant blessed” and not only do evildoers prosper but even when testing God, they escape. The Lord then assured His People that He does keep in His memory those who fear Him and “and esteem His name.” “They shall be mine, says the Lord of host, my own special possession, on the day when I take action. And I will have compassion on them, as a man has compassion on his son who serves him.” In today’s reading, God reminds His people that, while the evildoers may seem to lead a comfortable life today, there is a day coming, “blazing like an oven when all the arrogant and all evildoers will stumble, And the day that is coming will set them on fire, leaving them neither root nor branch.” Then He says, But for you who fear my name, the sun of justice will arise with healing in its wings; And you will go out leaping like calves from the stall.”



    Is not that a wonderful image of the Holy
    Mass? Christ, the Son of Justice arising – on the third day – with healing on
    His wings – “wings” an image of Christ Jesus’ arms spread out on the Cross. As
    for “leaping like calves from the stall,” if we truly believed the power and
    healing we receive through the liturgy and, most especially, through consuming the
    Holy Eucharist, we would be excited to be dismissed from the Mass; not because it
    took too long, or because we have something better today, but, rather, because
    we cannot wait to break back into the world to share with it what and who we
    have received through the liturgy.  



    The
    Second Reading from Second Thessalonians
    3:7-12 shows a different way how Christians ought not to approach life in this
    world. While some of the People of the prophet Malachi’s time had to be
    reminded why they ought to persevere in the faith because the day of the Lord
    would come, some in the Church of Thessalonica had fallen to the sin of
    presumption; thinking that the coming of the Lord was very near. This idea of the
    near approach Parousia may have been part of the false teaching that the Church
    of Thessalonica received from those who they thought were associated with the Apostolic
    Church. In response, the Apostle Saint Paul reminds the People of example of
    work and industry that the fathers of their Church set for them and commands
    them in the name of Jesus Christ to imitate them in this way and to “keep away
    from any brother who is living in idleness and not in accord with the tradition
    that you received from us” (v. 6).



    Paul sounds so completely judgmental,
    does he not? He was essentially saying, ‘There are some bad people living among
    you who call themselves Christians. They are not Christians because they do not
    follow our tradition. Moreover, they are lazy bums who don’t mind their own
    business. I command you in the name of Jesus Christ to stay away from them so
    that they don’t infect you.’ This teaching on not following the ways of
    evildoers is a teaching found in every book of the Bible, but is also a
    teaching that is lost on a Church today; a Church that only wants to appease
    the world and to appease sinners, so that they will like us and not think that
    we are judging them.



    Yet, setting God’s p

    • 9 min
    The Liturgy is Creating in Us the Heart of a Martyr for Christ (32nd Sunday OT) Year C

    The Liturgy is Creating in Us the Heart of a Martyr for Christ (32nd Sunday OT) Year C

    Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time



    2 Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-142 Thessalonians 2:16-3:5Luke 20:27-38



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    In regard to the liturgy of the Holy Mass, there is no more of a dangerous thought than the one that advances the notion that we should bring what belongs to the world into the liturgy. We seem to be more interested in bringing the world into the liturgy, than bringing the liturgy into the world. We seem to be more interested in using the finite things of the world to change the liturgy, than using the infinite things of the liturgy to change the world. This peculiar notion is how we found gay masses and clown masses and ethnic masses and the so-called ‘liturgical inculturation’ of the mass.



    Truly, not far deep down into our souls, I believe we are afraid and scared. We are afraid and scared that the liturgy might actually perform what it proposes; that is, making us like Christ Jesus. Being like Christ Jesus; actually being compelled to be love, to be sacrifice, and to be a Eucharistic People is scary to the natural human heart. It sounds like a hard life. So hard that it sounds much easier to just kill Christ Jesus by conforming Him to the world. Far easier it is to be an assassin of Christ than it is to be like Christ. This is why there are those who work day and night to destroy everything that is good and true about the Holy Mass. They may hate themselves and they may hate us, but ultimately, they are just afraid and scared of what the liturgy is proposing.



    The readings for this 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time – C Cycle comes to remind us today that God is calling us out of the wilderness and deserts of the world where only death is wished upon and easily found, and into a reborn and resurrected life with Him.



    The First Reading from Second Maccabees 7:1-2, 9-14, concerns the martyrdom of the seven brothers and their mother who “were arrested and tortured with whips and scourges by the king, to force them to eat pork in violation of God’s law.” One of the brothers, “acting as their spokesman, said, “What do you expect to achieve by questioning us? We are ready to die rather than transgress the laws of our ancestors.” Thereafter, each of the brothers and finally their mother received a more gruesome torture and death than the next, but one after the other spoke more eloquently and more passionately about why they were choosing obedience to God over the dictates of the world. When the fourth brother was near death after being maltreated and tortured, “he said, “It is my choice to die at the hands of men with the hope God gives of being raised up by him; but for you, there will be no resurrection to life.” It is true, if there is no resurrection, then there is nothing in this life that is worth dying for. If there is no resurrection, then everything is just vanity.



    Most likely, while the Apostle Saint Paul was still in the city of Corinth, he was occasioned to receive a report from Timothy about the Church in Thessalonica where Timothy had been sent in Paul’s stead. There are good things to report about what is going with the Thessalonians, but also the community there had some questions and concerns about the fate of those who died. There seems to be some confusion going about because of small false teachers they had received; thinking that they were associated with Apostolic Church. In this portion of the letter, found in Second Thessalonians 2:16 – 3:5, the Apostle asks for prayers for the People of God; for their delivery and endurance till the end against the wicked and perverse false teachers who were seeking the destroy their faith. As it was then, it is today. There are those who come dressed as sheep and

    • 13 min
    Joe Biden and The Eucharist Gate Scandal

    Joe Biden and The Eucharist Gate Scandal

    In this video podcast, I talk about how the response by people like Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Bishop W. Francis Malooly, and Jesuit Jamie Martin to Father Morey showing Joe Biden mercy by not allowing him to receive the Holy Eucharist unworthily was very troubling but beneficial for faithful Catholics to see how badly the wolves in the Church want to destroy their souls.



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    • 15 min
    How the Liturgy Makes Us Worthy of Our Calling (31st Sunday OT) Year C

    How the Liturgy Makes Us Worthy of Our Calling (31st Sunday OT) Year C

    Thirty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time



    Wisdom 11:22 – 12:2 1 Thessalonians 1:11 – 2:2Luke 19:1-10



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    The selection of readings at the Holy Mass for this 31st Sunday in Ordinary Time offers a powerful collection of Scriptures to entice us into knowing, understanding, and valuing the immensity of God’s of love and interest is in bringing His People into communion with Him.



    The First Reading from the book of Wisdom 11:22 – 12:2 so beautifully describe the heart of God that it barely needs to be commented on, but if imagine if you will a God who never tires of the Holy Mass; of for centuries having those who love Him and those who He loves He gather together to offer Him worship and praise from the rising of the sun until its setting, from every corner of the earth. Imagine God never tiring to enter our bodies and being consumed by us as the Holy Eucharist. Never ceasing to gather His People across the span of centuries and revealing Himself to them in a manner that they can digest physically and spiritually. God does this because He deeply yearns for us to know that He is there for us and that He loves us. Though His love is always revealing itself and can never be hidden, paradoxically His love is also incomprehensible and unfathomable. To Him, both repentant sinners and saints alike approach with fear and trembling and love, because they know that He loved them first and loves them beyond even their own self-knowledge. For our daily sins of things that we have done and things we have failed to do, we truly deserve death, but as the text reads:



    “Before the LORD the whole universe is as a grain from a balance or a drop of morning dew come down upon the earth. But you have mercy on all, because you can do all things; and you overlook people’s sins that they may repent. For you love all things that are and loathe nothing that you have made; for what you hated, you would not have fashioned. And how could a thing remain, unless you willed it; or be preserved, had it not been called forth by you? But you spare all things, because they are yours, O LORD and lover of souls, for your imperishable spirit is in all things! Therefore you rebuke offenders little by little, warn them and remind them of the sins they are committing, that they may abandon their wickedness and believe in you, O LORD!”



    Most likely, while the Apostle Saint Paul was still in the city of Corinth, he was occasioned to receive a report from Timothy about the Church in Thessalonica where Timothy had been sent in Paul’s stead. There are good things to report about what is going with the Thessalonians, but also the community there had some questions and concerns about the fate of those who died. There seems to be some confusion going about because of small false teachers they had received; thinking that they were associated with Apostolic Church. Therefore, Paul’s address to that community in First Thessalonians concerns some strong units on eschatology. Here, in the opening of the letter, in 1:11 – 2:2, the Apostle begins with offering the faithful a word of encouragement to not be “shaken out of your minds suddenly, or to be alarmed” concerning what Paul calls the parousia (the coming of Christ) “and our assembling with Him.”



    The reason why the Apostle is saying
    that there is no reason to worry or to be anxious is for the same reason he
    will tell the Church at Philippi in a future letter; that, “He who began a good
    work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ” (Philippians 1:6). In this earlier
    letter, he words this same truth in writing, “We always pray for you, that our
    God may make you worthy of his calling and powerfully br

    • 11 min
    The Solemnity of All Saints

    The Solemnity of All Saints

    The Solemnity of All Saints



    Revelation 7:2-4, 9-141 John 3:1-3Matthew 5:1-12



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    All Saint’s Day is that Holy Day of the Catholic Church when we commemorate all of our holy brothers and sisters in the Church Triumphant; those known and unknown to us. It is so wonderful and beneficial to know that we have friends in Heaven who are willing to assist us along the same journey that they too processed. The prayers of the Church Glorified are so efficacious because each of them can identify with us most uniquely. They have walked in our shoes; they know our trials, our sufferings, and our temptations. Therefore, we call on them in trust to intercede for us in prayer and to carry our petitions to the throne of God.



    In today’s First Reading from Revelation 7:2-4, 9-14, the servant John received a vision of the Holy Mass across the span of centuries where he saw “a great multitude, which no one could count, from every nation, race, people, and tongue. They stood before the throne and before the Lamb, wearing white robes and holding palm branches in their hands.” It is clear here that vision that John was given a Palm Sunday Mass, with the faithful holding out palm branches during the procession. The text then says they cried out in a loud voice: “Salvation comes from our God, who is seated on the throne, and from the Lamb.” In this next part of his vision, it sounds like the servant John heard the Gloria in Excelsis Deo, which would have not been heard during Lent, but sang aloud on Easter Sunday.



    At the end of this portion of John’s vision, he says one of the elders spoke up and said to me, “Who are these wearing white robes, and where did they come from?” John replied, “My lord, you are the one who knows.” The elder then told him, “These are the ones who have survived the time of great distress; they have washed their robes and made them white in the Blood of the Lamb.” This vision of the holy and pure saints in Heaven that the servant John saw is a fulfillment of what is written in today’s Second Reading from First John 3:1-3; that “We do know that when it is revealed we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is. Everyone who has this hope based on him makes himself pure, as he is pure.”



    I believe that the words
    Tertullian in his Apology (197 A.D.), offers a powerful image of the time our
    saints spent on earth during these periods of great distress:



    “Crucify us, torture us, condemn us, destroy us! Your wickedness is the proof of our innocence, for which reason does God suffer us to suffer this. When recently you condemned a Christian maiden to a panderer rather than to a panther, you realized and confessed openly that with us a stain on our purity is regarded as more dreadful than any punishment and worse than death. Nor does your cruelty, however exquisite, accomplish anything: rather, it is an enticement to our religion. The more we are hewn down by you, the more numerous do we become. The blood of martyrs is the seed of Christians.”



    The clearest path to sainthood offered through the Synoptic Gospels is the one we have by Christ our Lord in today’s Gospel Reading from Matthew 5:1-12. The nine beatitudes are, truly, nine opportunities of grace that we have to attach our mind, body, and soul to the sacred heart of Christ Jesus, and when they these nine opportunities are practiced consistently, they become our supernatural behaviors and our eternal light up that narrow way to Mount Calvary where we will die in Christ, be buried in Christ, and rise in Christ.



    The liturgy of the Holy Mass not only offers us a perfect path to
    process up to Calvary, but with the hosts of angels and the communion saints

    • 7 min

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