111 episodes

An aviation podcast by aviation geeks for anyone who looks up when they hear an airplane fly overhead. Listen in as Ian Petchenik and Jason Rabinowitz bring you aviation news, views, and special guests for a half hour every other week. If you're a new avgeek or just can't get enough aviation in your life, get your avgeek fix with us.

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast Flightradar24

    • Aviation
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

An aviation podcast by aviation geeks for anyone who looks up when they hear an airplane fly overhead. Listen in as Ian Petchenik and Jason Rabinowitz bring you aviation news, views, and special guests for a half hour every other week. If you're a new avgeek or just can't get enough aviation in your life, get your avgeek fix with us.

    Meet Frugal the Squirrel

    Meet Frugal the Squirrel

    On this episode of AvTalk, the densest version of the 737 MAX is certified, a ketchup packet shortage brings us back to a previous espiode, and we talk with Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren about an important but under-reported portion of Boeing’s history.

    SJ182

    The memory module from the cockpit voice recorder of Sriwijaya Air flight 182 has been recovered.

    MAX 8-200

    The FAA and EASA have certified the 737 MAX 8-200, the high density version of the MAX 8 that can seat over 200 passengers in its densest configuration. Boeing added an exit door aft of the wing to facilitate the increased passenger count. This variant of the MAX was designed with Ryanair in mind and the airline is now ready to take delivery of its first of hundreds of 737 MAX.

    GPS unit replacements

    An issue with a Rockwell Collins GPS unit means that they’ll need to be replaced on approximately 3,500 aircraft in the US alone. But interesting, the fix requires a hardware update, not software.

    Japan Airlines retiring PW4000-powered 777-200s

    In a very unsurprising announcement, Japan Airlines says that it will not return its PW4000-powered 777-200s to service. These aircraft are affected by the grounding and inspection order regarding PW4000 engine failures. Japan Airlines had already planned to retire these aircraft soon, so moving the timeline forward just makes sense.

    Boeing restarts 787 deliveries

    After a five month halt, Boeing resumed 787 deliveries in late March with the first aircraft going to United Airlines.

    Problems for Ethiopian Airlines in Zambia

    Last weekend, two Ethiopian Airlines flights made approaches and one landing at a still under construction airport in Zambia.

    Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren introduces us to Frugal the Squirrel

    We welcome back Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren and open up is vault of airline history to meet Frugal the Squirrel, Boeing’s mid-1970s ‘larger-than-life’ energy conservation mascot.



    Ketchup crisis

    There’s a ketchup package shortage in the US, and we know exactly who to call.

    The longest flight that wasn’t

    This is a bit of an odd one. Comlux’s recently acquired 787, formerly an Aeromexico aircraft, flew from Seoul to Buenos Aires, a distance of 12,106 miles. They then said it was the world’s longest flight ever recorded. It’s a long flight to be sure, but with out any qualifying statement, it’s incorrect. As for commercial aircraft, a Boeing 777-200LR flew from Hong Kong to London in the eastbound direction for a total flight of 13,422 miles. The flight time for the 777 was also longer at 22 hr 43 min compared to 20 hr 19 min for the Comlux 787. An impressive feat by Comlux, but the question remains: why?

    Let us know what you think (and let your friends know)

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

     

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Ian does his best to pronounce Fagradalsfjall

    Ian does his best to pronounce Fagradalsfjall

    On this episode, we check on Iceland’s erupting volcano, dig through the Ukraine International Airlines flight 752 final report, and Gabe sits down with Amapola Flyg’s CEO to learn more about the small airline operating a fleet of Fokker 50s.

    Eruption at Fagradalsfjall

    The eruption at Fagradalsfjall made its fiery debut last week southeast of Iceland’s main airport, Keflavik. Fortunately, this eruption was not accompanied by a massive ash cloud, and has actually increased tourism in the area.

    The PS752 final report and its discontents

    Iran’s Air Accident Investigation Board released its final report on the downing of PS752 this week, reiterating the cause of the crash to be the missiles fired at the aircraft shortly after takeoff from Tehran. Both Ukraine and Canada took the unusual step of criticizing the report, with Ukraine saying that its ‘does not reveal the root causes of the tragedy or the chain of actions that led to it.’ For its part, a href="https://u7728411.ct.sendgrid.net/ls/click?upn=mApdclgS5Xvf3-2Blmg-2FI-2BeCXwzOBo0MZwrdKN9UM6Gqje3n-2BOoACBJHdQInVk8r657BkYdrophIWwTHMxtwvL-2Fhp-2BF1B5YW6lpki-2FNQkMkV06gFnVv4Tys1iAsGblCzdSzHH5MdEOsdfgG5NAvZ7uSO7lhgMra6xS11jgrx2HTOadyPpwaQD1-2FV0Sh3HIzxlf-2FdGIQrRjTNmPKcMp9MKMI-2BxOmdByjQPZRkKqJvZHo1s-3D8Owa_idOCIPYy-2F2wf4b8Oewr5-2FyynhiU9x1P0-2F2lklVwhcxARsbnRg90-2BffnDQSTMu0LRht-2Fms0xzmMhbKwjJRDjpjl5Y0wiWMWP69rJkV5cFUFjDH6cwr6x88DN5hBJW6TkMNZVCpkophAC5HL8qTV0-2B71lq1wlsuyK8VqRgfrrrPu42JzIH8BfFd0BL9He6-2B0BWi5Tyb1zbQV618jVphm2Z8m1MXWwrewjKbZ6ZJniPGxtYbV2LxsKC5jvksAb9tB2deqsEuCgL9e1bAttAJdYMpEhoSMdLjZ4MtBwkFwHfX3m-2Fxbpbl41CaXyALC1QtRIGHeZAzLiIszg1KCfaLHWHx-2FcT6oemIK9asIC6HHaM7pK5lGT39nzcJFCpQ5Y9oGM2KYYiZS3X4jhUGUgMqitDiWEugNaasJfjtFXAeSWvFImEhJkHIHiFmF-2Bd0TFeak9M" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=https://u7728411.ct.sendgrid.net/ls/click?upn%3DmApdclgS5Xvf3-2Blmg-2FI-2BeCXwzOBo0MZwrdKN9UM6Gqje3n-2BOoACBJHdQInVk8r657BkYdrophIWw...

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Strong words from Sir Tim Clark

    Strong words from Sir Tim Clark

    On this episode of AvTalk, we mark two years since the crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 and the beginning of a years long effort to fix the 737 MAX and return it to service. We also discuss Sir Tim Clark’s recent comments on Boeing in an interview with Jon Ostrower of the The Air Current. And Air Baltic CEO Martin Gauss joins us for an AvTalk interview to discuss how the airline has managed through the pandemic, including becoming an all A220-operator almost overnight.

    Two years since Ethiopian flight 302

    This week marks two years since the crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302—the second deadly crash of the 737 MAX in just over 3 months— and the beginning of a nearly two year worldwide grounding of the aircraft while Boeing and regulators from around the world addressed issues with the aircraft’s design. We take stock of where the MAX program is now and what’s changed since March 2019.

    Promised link: Southwest’s initial 737 MAX routes

     

    Tim Clark’s strong words for Boeing

    In an interview with The Air Current’s Jon Ostrower, Emirates Airline president Tim Clark had strong words for Boeing about the 737 MAX, the quality issues surrounding the 787, and the company’s overall culture. Clark places blame for the aircraft manufacturer’s woes directly on management and Boeing’s board of directors. We pull out some of the choice quotes to discuss, but the interview is well worth reading in its entirety.

    UA328 update

    The NTSB issued an investigative update on 5 March, providing additional information on the sequence of events that led to the failure of the PW4077 on UA328. According to the NTSB, the pilots reported that they increased the engine power four minutes after take off to climb more quickly through expected turbulence, and ‘immediately after the throttles were advanced a loud bang was recorded on the CVR. FDR data indicate the engine made an uncommanded shutdown and the engine fire warning activated shortly after.’

    AvTalk interview with airBaltic CEO Martin Gauss

    Gabriel Leigh speaks with airBaltic CEO Martin Gauss to learn how the airline has weathered the pandemic, what it’s like becoming an A220-only operator overnight, and how the next few months will critical for the airline as it gets ready to exit hibernation.

    Read a condensed, annotated version of our interview with Martin Gauss

     

    AerCap and GECAS to combine

    AerCap is set to acquire General Electric’s aviation leasing arm GECAS in a deal that will see the combined lessor own over 2,000 aircraft.

    DARPA invents grass

    In Ian’s favorite story of the week, DARPA has come up with a novel solution to reduce the dust produced by landing V-22 aircraft.

    Let us know what you think

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes.

    • 1 hr 8 min
    How to run an airport in Antarctica

    How to run an airport in Antarctica

    On this very special episode of AvTalk, we’re joined by Sven Lidström of the Norwegian Polar Institute to learn about Troll Research Station in Antarctica and the station’s blue ice runway.

    Troll Research Station

    As the operations coordinator at the Troll Research Station in Antarctica, Lidström is in charge of making sure the polar outpost runs smoothly. Since 2005, that job has included maintaining the research station’s 3000 meter runway built into the blue ice on the glacier in front of the station. Located 250 kilometers from the edge of the ice shelf and 4,300 km from Cape Town, the nearest international airport, all of the challenges at Troll are magnified by its remote location.

    For more images from Troll, see our companion blog post.

    Watch video of Icelandair’s 767 arriving and departing Troll Station.

     

    Let us know what you think

    Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

    • 35 min
    It’s raining engine parts

    It’s raining engine parts

    On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss what we know so far about the engine failure aboard United Airlines flight UA328 and what investigators and regulators are doing now to ensure that the Pratt & Whitney PW4000 engine is safe to operate.

    It’s raining engine parts

    On Saturday, 20 February two engine failures on two different aircraft led to two very different responses. Over Maastricht, a Longtail Aviation 747 ejected engine components from its number 1 engine after it failed just after take off. The aircraft held while jettisoning fuel and made a safe landing at Liège (not Leizig as Ian misstated) a short time later.

    Later in the day, United Airlines UA328 departed Denver and approximately 4 minutes after takeoff its number 2 engine failed. Engine parts, including the inlet cowl rained down on Broomfield, Colorado west of Denver and the flight made a safe landing back at Denver 23 minutes after take off.

    We pick up the discussion to see what has happened in the week since, including the worldwide grounding of the PW4000-112 engine pending detailed inspections.

    Helpful UA328 links



    * UA328 flight data and updates on investigator and regulator actions

    * Twitter thread by former 777 (and current 767) pilot “Miami Rick” on the actions the crew would perform in an engine failure scenario

    * Where are the grounded PW4000-powered 777s?



    Planes in, planes out

    We run through the wide variety of fleet movements made by airlines over the past year.

    Updates on the MAX

    SCAT Airlines puts their MAX 8 back in service and the US Department of Transportation Inspector General releases its report on the FAA’s certification of the 737 MAX.

    Let us know what you think

    Thank you so much for listening this year! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

     

     

    • 49 min
    AvTalk Episode 104: Air Greenland CEO Jacob Nitter

    AvTalk Episode 104: Air Greenland CEO Jacob Nitter

    On this episode of AvTalk, Air Greenland CEO Jacob Nitter joins Gabriel Leigh for a discussion on how the airline has managed through the pandemic and how they’re planning to emerge on the other side. We also discuss the recently released preliminary report on the crash of Sriwijaya Air flight 182 and the dramatic drop in air traffic in China to start the year.

    Sriwijaya Air 182 preliminary report

    Indonesian investigators have released their preliminary report on the crash of Sriwijaya Air flight 182. We cover the report’s findings and lay out which questions still need answers.

    Air traffic in China drops to start the year

    Air traffic in China is down significantly from mid-December through the beginning of February. We take a look at the numbers.

    Air Greenland CEO Jacob Nitter

    Air Greenland CEO Jacob Nitter sits down with our Gabriel Leigh to discuss how the airline has navigated the pandemic, their fleet renewal, and why the airline is optimistic about the future of aviation in Greenland.

    Flight tests and long distance deliveries

    We run down some surprising upcoming test flights and a few long-distance deliveries.

    Sun Country going public

    Sun Country Airlines is set to become a public company soon. We take a look at the unique situation of Sun Country and how they were able to grow their business in 2020.

    Listener mailbag

    We begin a new series we’re calling listener mailbag where we answer questions from listeners about aviation topics they have questions about. In our first rummage through the mailbag, Matthew Justice wants to know why some airlines paint an aircraft’s registration on the wing and some do not.

    If you have a question you’d like us to answer, email us here.

    Let us know what you think

    Thank you so much for listening this year! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.

     

    • 1 hr 6 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

RyanHJH ,

A podcast for aviation enthusiasts

Love this podcast and have listened to Ian and Jason from episode 1. They provide a deeper insight into the aviation world along with humour to really make this podcast enjoyable. Definitely one of the best aviation podcasts out there. Keep up the great work Ian and Jason!

Stefan36534 ,

Perfect for avgeeks

This is one of my favorite aviation podcasts. I get excited every time a new episode comes out, and love the combination of aviation news with Jason’s and Ian’s humor! Keep up the good work.

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