63 episodes

Brief and concise historical episodes of the African-American experience. Narrated by renowned historian, Henry Louis Gates Jr. and executive produced by Robert F. Smith.

Black History in Two Minutes (or so) Be Woke Presents...

    • History

Brief and concise historical episodes of the African-American experience. Narrated by renowned historian, Henry Louis Gates Jr. and executive produced by Robert F. Smith.

    • video
    Oscar Micheaux: The First Black Indie Filmmaker

    Oscar Micheaux: The First Black Indie Filmmaker

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    Transitioning from job to job as a teenager, Oscar Micheaux was able to write a story that was inspired by his experience on a farm. The novel, entitled The Homesteader, was published and later adapted into a silent motion picture. With this project, he became the first black filmmaker to independently produce and direct his own feature films.

    Micheaux’s creative contributions didn’t stop there. He continued to create movies that tackled themes specific to the black experience, juxtaposing the imagery being depicted in Hollywood at the time. Despite efforts to censor him, Micheaux was able to create over 30 films spanning three decades.

    In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from historian Donald Bogle, Vincent Brown of Harvard University, and Imani Perry of Princeton University, we explore the path of the first major black filmmaker. Micheaux legacy remains as one who used his platform to highlight social injustices despite those who tried to censor him.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Alamy Images

    • Everett Collection, Inc.

    • Getty Images

    • Library of Congress



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor.

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 3 min
    • video
    W.E.B. Du Bois: The New Negro at The 1900 Paris Exposition

    W.E.B. Du Bois: The New Negro at The 1900 Paris Exposition

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    At the turn of the twentieth century, W. E. B. Du Bois curated an exhibit at the Paris Exposition in France entitled “The Exhibit of American Negroes.” The exhibition used photographs to disrupt the negative imagery that was used to depict black Americans at the time.

    With over 45 million visiting the exhibit, Du Bois was able to put the dignified black person front and center on an international scene. This illuminating experience propelled the “New Negro” movement in the United States, highlighting a sharp contrast from the Jim Crow agenda being pushed elsewhere. Du Bois would continue his excellence as an author, historian and activist, paving the way for other pro-black entities to exist.

    In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Rhae Lynn Barnes of Princeton University, Chad Williams of Brandeis University, and Farah Griffin of Columbia University, we celebrate an American hero who successfully elevated and illuminated the black experience for the world to see.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Alamy Images

    • Everett Collection, Inc.

    • Library of Congress

    • Getty Images



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor.

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 3 min
    • video
    School Integration

    School Integration

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    The landmark case Brown v. Board of Education declared that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional. However, for most black and white families, the decision was met with resistance and a court mandate didn’t mean things were going to change.

    Politicians and officials throughout the country found ways to ensure full-on school integration never happened. From protests, to throwing bricks, to blocking entrances at schools, the new law of the land was met with sharp resistance. Even as the NAACP intervened and busing orders were implemented, integrating schools seemed more like a wish than a sure thing.

    In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Hasan Jeffries of Ohio State University, we take a look at a this monumental case. While it sought to provide access and equality for black kids across the country, decades later, it still come up short.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Alamy Images

    • Associated Press

    • Getty Images

    • Shutterstock



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor.

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 2 min
    • video
    Migrations: From Exodusters to Great Migrations

    Migrations: From Exodusters to Great Migrations

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    With the formal ending of slavery in place, many freed black people saw this as an opportunity to start anew. But, for those in the south, things didn’t seem much different. The southern black experience saw more aggression, lynchings and segregation. As a result, the time to move was imminent.

    World War I allowed black people to enter the factory workspace as they left the south. As black people migrated, they were able to establish their own neighborhoods. By World War II, these communities were able to welcome more black migrants and aid in their entrance into an industrialized workforce.

    In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Nell Irvin Painter of Princeton University and Farah Griffin of Columbia University, we look at how black people left the south in hopes of freedom, equality, and new opportunities.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Alamy Images

    • Everett Collection, Inc.

    • Getty Images

    • Library of Congress

    • National Archives and Records Administration



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor.

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 3 min
    • video
    The First Underground Railroad

    The First Underground Railroad

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    The Underground Railroad for many of us symbolizes the journey African slaves went on in the name of freedom. But, contrary to popular belief, the first path wasn’t south to north. Instead, it was north to south.

    Spanish Florida was an independent entity and many enslaved Africans in the Carolinas and Georgia knew that if they escaped, they’d be granted asylum, as well as their freedom. For nearly a century, hundreds of slaves took the same journey south and crossed the border. However, in 1790, facing pressure from the United States government, Florida agreed to stop accepting slaves. This halted the passage for a moment in time.

    In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Hasan Jeffries of Ohio State University and Vincent Brown of Harvard University, we explore the starting point of a trail that led thousands of slaves to freedom. But to this day, the passage represents the extremes enslaved Africans would go to attain the life they knew they deserved.  [related episode: Fort Mose: The First All-Black Settlement in the U.S.“]

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Alamy Images

    • Historical Archaeology Program at the Florida Museum of Natural History.

    • Getty Images

    Additional Footage Courtesy of:

    • Inkwell Films, Kunhardt & WNET



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor.

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 2 min
    • video
    Second Middle Passage

    Second Middle Passage

    Be Woke Presents Black History in Two Minutes (or so)

    As the United States began to expand, the demand for cotton led to an increase of slave trades in the country. Eager to capitalize, slave owners sold slaves into the deep south and west in the name of expanding the economy.

    Chained and shackled together, black families were uprooted, disrupted and forced to start again in the name of preparing for white civilization. The domestic slave trade mimicked patterns of shattering families in Africa, all the while placing financial gain before humanity. In total, nearly one million black slaves were sold during this time, lasting up until the Civil War.

    In this episode of Black History In Two Minutes or So hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr., with additional commentary from Hasan Jeffries of Ohio State University and Vincent Brown of Harvard University, we explore the second middle passage, a forced migration meant to support the booming cotton industry and westward expansion, all the while continuing the cycle of tearing black families apart for fiscal gain.

    Black History in Two Minutes (or so) is a 2x Webby Award winning series.

    If you haven’t already, please review us on Apple Podcasts! It’s a helpful way to for new listeners to discover what we are doing here: Podcast.Apple.com/Black-History-in-Two-Minutes/



    Archival Materials Courtesy of:

    • Library of Congress

    • The New York Public Library

    • Getty Images



    Executive Producers:

    • Robert F. Smith

    • Henry Louis Gates Jr.

    • Dyllan McGee

    • Deon Taylor



    Produced by:

    • William Ventura

    • Romilla Karnick



    Music By:

    • Oovra Music



    Be Woke presents is brought to you by Robert F. Smith and Deon Taylor.

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Facebook

    Follow Black History in Two Minutes on Instagram

    Subscribe to Black History in Two Minutes Youtube Channel

    ‘Black History in Two Minutes’ is also available on Apple and Google podcasts.



    Distributed by aone.la

    Powered by hyperengine.ai

    • 3 min

Top Podcasts In History

Listeners Also Subscribed To