29 episodes

The Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast brings you revealing stories about the world of business, finance, technology, and beyond. Each of our episodes tackles an intriguing question (why do so many pro athletes go broke?) or a persistent problem in the business world (can gender diversity carry a bottom-line value?) and introduces us to people working in sometimes surprising corners in the realm of capital. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. and Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, members SIPC.

Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast Morgan Stanley

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The Morgan Stanley Ideas Podcast brings you revealing stories about the world of business, finance, technology, and beyond. Each of our episodes tackles an intriguing question (why do so many pro athletes go broke?) or a persistent problem in the business world (can gender diversity carry a bottom-line value?) and introduces us to people working in sometimes surprising corners in the realm of capital. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. and Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, members SIPC.

    Fishing for Data in a Sea of Stars

    Fishing for Data in a Sea of Stars

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing. In 1969, Neil Armstrong’s first steps inspired advancements that led to everything from modern kitchen appliances to the Internet. But 50 years later, space exploration isn’t limited to government-funded missions, launches, and astronauts. Now, private companies are leading today’s “space race” and will help us enter a new era of growth—with satellites. In our season finale, we look toward the stars to see how the satellites of the future could help improve life here on Earth. 

    We start in Washington State with Chris and Libie Cain, a husband and wife fishing team, whose albacore tuna business is strained by illegal fishing practices — one of the many problems that may soon be solved by satellites. Then, we talk to Mike Safyan, the V.P. of Launch at Planet Labs, a start-up that’s revolutionizing how satellites scan the Earth. Planet currently has over 150 satellites capturing data that it licenses to scientists and industry leaders who want the latest information on everything from forest fires to fish migratory patterns. David Kroodsma, an environmental data scientist with Global Fishing Watch, is one of the beneficiaries of the satellite data. He explains how satellite technology can help prescribe preventative medicine for the seas ​and h​elp people like the Cains, who rely on the economy of the ocean. Morgan Stanley Managing Director of Equity Research Adam Jonas tells us that satellites may soon disrupt the economy of data, shifting information away from some of the largest tech companies in the world to some of the smallest. Along the way, he helps us understand why we should all be excited about the new focus on the humble satellite, and what a booming New Space Economy will mean for Planet Earth.










    The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media.  The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.

    This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.

    © 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC.  Members SIPC.

    • 23 min
    Shopping for the Future

    Shopping for the Future

    The summer bestseller you read on the way to work, a flower delivery for your sister’s birthday, dinner made fresh from your weekly meal kit— today you can have every part of your day ordered online and delivered to you without ever leaving your home. But what about your favorite shop around the corner or even the malls of your childhood? With the growing convenience and efficiency of online shopping come questions about the future of traditional retail. Are brick-and-mortar stores fated to crumble under the weight of the e-commerce boom? Or will online and traditional stores find ways to coexist?

    On this episode of the Ideas Podcast, we’re going to one place where the future of retail is already in full swing: Tokyo. Akira Ito, CEO of Itoya, takes us on a tour of the stationery company’s 115 year-old flagship location. As we explore Itoya’s twelve-story playground of paper, we learn how Japan’s oldest stationery company has continued to thrive by curating experiences that keep customers shopping in their store. Then, Masahiro Ito, an executive director at ZOZO, Japan’s largest online apparel retailer, brings us into a future where that personalized, face-to-face shopping experience will be replicated on the Internet. And we visit Topdrawer, a store in Brookline, Massachusetts, where the best of both worlds has made its way into the American retail experience. Along the way, Morgan Stanley’s Managing Director of Retail Research, Kimberly Greenberger, highlights the power of the shopper’s rising expectations in shaping the future of retail.



















    The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.

    This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.

    © 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

    • 27 min
    "Thoughts on the Market" Preview - Mike Wilson: 3 Summer Surprises Investors Could Be Missing

    "Thoughts on the Market" Preview - Mike Wilson: 3 Summer Surprises Investors Could Be Missing

    On this preview episode of the new Morgan Stanley podcast "Thoughts on the Market", Chief Investment Officer Mike Wilson says markets are typically savvy on how and when to price news events. But are markets overlooking some potential bad news?

    • 3 min
    Living Together, Separately

    Living Together, Separately

    In the future, we’ll all still need a place to live. But as rents continue to rise and the housing market changes, we might need to adjust our vision of home. Instead of living in a tiny, expensive apartment or funneling our savings into a down payment for a single-family home, we might choose to live together for the sake of space, money, and, above all else, community. This type of housing model, known as co-living, has existed throughout history, but new iterations of co-living are becoming real housing options for all different types of people across the globe. In this episode of ​Ideas, ​we’re going to explore different versions of co-living to understand why it might help solve some of the housing market’s greatest challenges.

    We’ll start in London at The Collective: Old Oak, the world’s largest co-living complex, where young, mobile workforce is learning “how to have it all”—community, leisure, and an apartment in one of the world’s most expensive cities—by trading in personal space for communal luxuries. But, as history has shown, communal living isn’t just limited to one demographic. We’ll also travel to Portland, Oregon, for a tour of PDX Commons, a co-housing community for 55-year-olds and older, to see how some members of the Baby Boomer generation will participate in the housing market of the future and, simultaneously, combat some of the stigma attached to aging. Finally, we’ll make our last stop in Copenhagen, Denmark, where Almenr, a startup that matches co-living tenants with financial advisors, architects, and designers, is helping niche communities create the co-living spaces of their dreams. Along the way, we’ll hear from Richard Hill, the head of commercial real estate research a Morgan Stanley. He’ll explain some of the fundamental changes in the traditional housing market, the challenges within the current market, and why co-living might be a viable housing solution for all.










    The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media.  The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.

    This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.

    © 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

    • 23 min
    Inventing Flavors: A Taste of the Future

    Inventing Flavors: A Taste of the Future

    Have you ever tasted a habanada pepper? An upstate abundance potato? A Robin’s Koginut squash? These new vegetable breeds, all created by Row Seven Seed Company, are bursting with new flavors that come straight from the earth. But what about those wasabi seaweed snacks? Or something like beer chips? Or crazy ice cream flavors that seem to come from natural sources but are most-likely made in a lab?

    The flavor industry is worth billions of dollars, but with new technology, our changing environment, globalization, and a better understanding of how to invent new types of food, the future of flavor is being pulled in two very different directions. As different players the food industry invent new flavors, consumers will have to make new choices about what flavors they want: flavors from the farm or the lab.

    In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we explore these two different locations to understand the future of the flavor industry. First, we travel to the Fingerlakes region in upstate New York, where we’ll tag along with Michael Mazourek, a plant breeder and co-founder of Row Seven Seed, as he delivers his produce and spreads Row Seven’s mission: to change our agricultural system by breeding for flavor.

    We then head to a lab across the country in Portland, Oregon, where we’ll meet Sarah Masoni, a flavor designer with a “million dollar palate.” There, Sarah will tell us why the future of flavor isn’t as subjective as we might think. And, finally, we’ll hear from Vincent Sinisi, a food retail analyst at Morgan Stanley, about how both consumers and food retailers are creating new opportunities for both farm and lab-made flavors to appear on your supermarket shelves.










    The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.

    This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.

    © 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

    • 23 min
    Potatoes into Polymers

    Potatoes into Polymers

    As you walk down the street, sit in your office, or even make yourself a cup of coffee, take a look around and consider what everything is made of. ​More often than not, the answer will be: plastic. Our world is made of plastic. It’s one of the most affordable, versatile and indestructible materials we have. But the very properties that make plastic perfect for so much have also made it problematic. Most of that plastic is still here, and it will be for hundreds of years. But in the future, we might be able to replace the plastic we’ve come to rely on with a plant-based material that holds all the promise of plastic, without the environmental costs. We're talking about something called "bioplastics."

    In this episode of the Ideas podcast, we take you to a laboratory in England to see these bioplastics in action. First, Vincent Andrews, Chemicals and Agriculture Equity Research Analyst at Morgan Stanley helps us understand how traditional plastic has become an integral part of both the economy and our daily lives. Next, Cole Rosengren, Senior Editor of ​Waste Dive ​explains how a little-known international policy has thwarted our the recycling system as we know it. We then sit down with David Rachelson, the Vice President of Sustainability at Rubicon Global, a startup that connects plastics producers, consumers, haulers and cities to tackle some of the inefficiencies of the current recycling model. Finally, we travel to a laboratory in Southampton, where we meet Paul Mines, the CEO of Biome Technologies, a company that is using materials such as cornstarch, potatoes and algae to create a sustainable, compostable plastic of the future.  










    The host Ashley Milne-Tyte is a contractor of Pineapple Street Media. The guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast.

    This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.

    © 2019 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC and Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Members SIPC.

    • 22 min

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