749 episodes

Podcast by The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness The Art of Manliness

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 29 Ratings

Podcast by The Art of Manliness

    Life's 10 Biggest Decisions

    Life's 10 Biggest Decisions

    How many of your life’s ten biggest decisions have you already made?


    My guest today, psychologist Dr. Adrian Camilleri, would often ask this question to friends and family, and found that it generated a lot of interesting conversation. It also generated a lot of his own thoughts, which made him want to dive more deeply into it and empirically study it and other related questions as well. 


    The result was the Biggest Life Decisions Project, which we'll be talking about on the show today. Adrian first explains the criteria that define a big life decision, the most common ones people make, and which of these decisions people rank as being the most important. We then talk about the numbers and types of big life decisions people typically make in each decade of their lives, and how these decisions tend to be front-loaded in your twenties, but you'll still have a surprising number to make in your later years, too. Adrian shares which decisions people tend to look back on positively and are correlated with higher life satisfaction, and which tend to lead to poor outcomes and regret. We also get into the way people can both underestimate and overestimate the importance of some decisions, before ending with what Adrian has learned by working on this project about how to make good life decisions. 


    After the show is over, check out the show notes at aom.is/tendecisions

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    • 43 min
    Rewild Your Life

    Rewild Your Life

    If you have one, take a look at your pet cat or dog. These animals descended from wildcats and wolves, but today live pretty sedate lives, walking around your house and yard, waiting for you to deliver some kibbles to their bowl.


    My guest today says that modern humans are, in a similar way, domesticated versions of our former, wilder ancestors, and that living a flourishing life requires reconnecting with the primal energy within that now lies dormant. His name is Micah Mortali and he's the founder of the Kripalu School of Mindful Outdoor Leadership and the author of Rewilding: Meditations, Practices, and Skills for Awakening in Nature. Micah first shares how he came to combine his passion for yoga and mindfulness with a love of the outdoors and bushcraft skills to create his unique philosophy of rewilding. We then dig into what rewilding means, and why it's vital to body, mind, and spirit to throw off the malaise of modern domestication and restore your sensory connection to nature. From there we turn to the practices that can help you do that, from walking barefoot in the woods to staring into a campfire to meditate. We also talk about how practicing hands-on ancestral skills like making fire with a bow drill, building a wilderness shelter, and tracking animals can heighten your confidence and awareness. We end our conversation with small things that everyone, even if you live in the suburbs or city, can start doing today to begin rewilding your life.

    Check out the show notes at aom.is/rewilding

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    • 50 min
    The Character Traits That Drive Optimal Performance

    The Character Traits That Drive Optimal Performance

    Why do some people who look can't-miss high-achievers on paper end up floundering in life, while those who can seem like underdogs end up flourishing?

    When my guest noticed this phenomenon while being involved in the selection process of veteran SEALs for a specialized command, it led him to the discovery that beneath more obvious skills are hidden drivers of performance, which he calls attributes. His name is Rich Diviney, and he's a retired Navy SEAL commander and the author of The Attributes: 25 Hidden Drivers of Optimal Performance. Today on the show, Rich discusses the difference between skills and attributes and how the latter can’t be taught, but can be developed. We then talk about the difference between peak and optimal performance, before turning to the attributes which drive the latter. We get into a discussion of the components of grit, the difference between discipline and self-discipline, why you should become something of a humble narcissist, and much more. We end our conversation with how to figure out the attributes you are and aren't strong in, and which you need for getting where you want to go.

    Check out our show notes at aom.is/attributes

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    • 46 min
    Being a Man in the Lousy Modern World

    Being a Man in the Lousy Modern World

    Note: This is a rebroadcast. It originally aired March 2020.

    Emerson famously said “society everywhere is in conspiracy against the manhood of every one of its members.” 

    My guest today says things have gotten a lot worse since Emerson uttered those words over a century and a half ago. His name is Robert Twigger. We last had him on the show to discuss his book Micromastery. Today we discuss a book he wrote 20 years ago called Being a Man in the Lousy Modern World. We begin our conversation discussing how the modern world infantilizes men so they’re easier to control, and whether Robert thinks things have changed since he initially published the book. We then dig into the four factors Robert says need to be in place for a man to feel like a man, and why experiencing these qualities has become harder to do in the present age. We then discuss what Robert did to counter the currents of modern malaise like hiking the Pyrenees mountains and learning a martial art, and whether doing those things actually made him feel manlier. We end our conversation with what men can do to start fighting back against the conspiracy against their manhood.

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    • 42 min
    College — What It Was, Is, and Should Be

    College — What It Was, Is, and Should Be

    Modern students are apt to see going to college as the way to earn a credential that will help them get a good job. But as Andrew Delbanco, Professor of American Studies at Columbia University, argues in his book College: What It Was, Is, and Should Be, higher education was developed for a different purpose — one it should fight to maintain. 


    Today on the show, Andrew shares how he decided to write his book to understand more about the history, nature, and value of an institution which has come under increasing pressure in the modern age. Andrew describes how America's earliest colleges were founded as places where students could learn from both their teachers and from each other, and thereby develop the capacity to grow in character, serve others, live a good life, and even face death. Andrew explains why colleges have largely abandoned this mission, and makes the case for why a broad, not-entirely-specialized, liberal arts education remains relevant in an age in which the ability to grapple with life's big questions is as crucial as ever. We also talk about the difference between colleges and universities (no, they're not synonyms), why a prospective student might choose the former over the latter, and what other things those contemplating where to go to school should consider when making their decision. 


    After the show is over, check out the show notes at aom.is/college

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 46 min
    Could Sleeping in Separate Beds Improve Your Relationship?

    Could Sleeping in Separate Beds Improve Your Relationship?

    When it comes to advice around getting better sleep, nearly all of it is directed at the individual sleeper who feels they've got room to improve: Here's what you might be doing wrong; here's how to straighten out your sleep hygiene. Yet for the millions of people who are sleeping with someone else in their bed, this advice leaves out a huge elephant in the room — the other person sharing your sheets. 

    As my guest today argues, a shared bed means shared sleep issues that need to be tackled with shared solutions. Her name is Dr. Wendy Troxel, she's a clinical psychologist, a sleep specialist, and the author of Sharing the Covers: Every Couple's Guide to Better Sleep. We begin our conversation by discussing how sleep not only affects people's relationships, but people's relationships affect their sleep, and how this bidirectional dynamic can become either a vicious or virtuous cycle, depending on the quality of sleep that a couple gets. We then talk about the various issues couples deal with in sharing a bed, from snoring to a mismatch in temperature preferences. We also get into the complications that come with bringing kids into the picture, and Wendy gives her take on the issue of family co-sleeping. From there we turn to solutions for shared sleep problems, and dig into the idea of sleeping in separate beds. Wendy unpacks the way the taboo around separate sleeping has waxed and waned throughout history, why it works for some couples, and the options for implementing it, from sleeping in separate bedrooms to a more moderate approach called the "Scandinavian Method." Wendy also gives advice to couples who want to continue to share the same bed, but struggle with the fact that one person is a morning bird and the other is a night owl.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 45 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

StephenDC ,

A weekly learning session

Never have I heard The Art of Manliness podcast and gone without learning anything useful from it.

SeppBund ,

Useful, informative and not as archaic as the title might suggest

Organically grown to become a comfortable channel to pick up „lost hows“, new ideas and enjoy engaging interviews.
This manliness is testosterone free while often harking back to the virtuous times when humanism was thought.

Fazrullah ,

Great, useful content.

Just like the website, the podcasts contains lots of good stuff. The contents are varied and are often stuff that I did not think as relevant to my life but surprisingly they are.

The audio is clear, great intro music (I felt transported back to the 1940s), Brett is a wonderful host with really great questions for his guests that helps us listeners learn more about the topics discussed.

He also does a great job of promoting the books or sites that the speakers are associated with. The commercials are actually fun to listen to as well and the products or services featured are relevant to men and pretty interesting.

The bad is that the guests are sometimes not great speakers. They go off tangent and babble a bit but Brett is always there to pull them back.

Overall, if you are serious about building a better life for you and your family then I’d recommend this podcast.

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