46 min

Can race be transcended‪?‬ The Gray Area with Sean Illing

    • Philosophy

Sean Illing talks with author Thomas Chatterton Williams about race and identity in America. Thomas has analyzed racial identity through the lens of his own upbringing, and the performativity and pressures he experienced. In conversation with Sean, Thomas speaks about how he sees these identities as restrictive connections to the racial oppressions of the past, whether it's possible to achieve liberation without sacrificing solidarity, and on the complex interplay between race and class.

Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
Guest: Thomas Chatterton Williams (@thomaschattwill), author; contributing writer, The Atlantic
References: 


Self-Portrait in Black and White: Family, Fatherhood, and Rethinking Race by Thomas Chatterton Williams (W.W. Norton; 2019)


Losing My Cool: Love, Literature, and a Black Man's Escape from the Crowd by Thomas Chatterton Williams (Penguin; 2011)


White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon; 2018)


"Camus' Stance on Algeria Still Stokes Debate in France" by Eleanor Beardsley (NPR; Nov. 7, 2013)


The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky (1880)


Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (One World; 2018)


South to a Very Old Place by Albert Murray (Vintage; 1991)


"The limits of anti-racism" by Adolph Reed (2009)

 
Enjoyed this episode? Rate The Gray Area ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of The Gray Area. Subscribe in your favorite podcast app.
Support The Gray Area by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
This episode was made by: 


Producer: Erikk Geannikis


Editor: Amy Drozdowska


Engineer: Patrick Boyd


Editorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. Hall


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sean Illing talks with author Thomas Chatterton Williams about race and identity in America. Thomas has analyzed racial identity through the lens of his own upbringing, and the performativity and pressures he experienced. In conversation with Sean, Thomas speaks about how he sees these identities as restrictive connections to the racial oppressions of the past, whether it's possible to achieve liberation without sacrificing solidarity, and on the complex interplay between race and class.

Host: Sean Illing (@seanilling), host, The Gray Area
Guest: Thomas Chatterton Williams (@thomaschattwill), author; contributing writer, The Atlantic
References: 


Self-Portrait in Black and White: Family, Fatherhood, and Rethinking Race by Thomas Chatterton Williams (W.W. Norton; 2019)


Losing My Cool: Love, Literature, and a Black Man's Escape from the Crowd by Thomas Chatterton Williams (Penguin; 2011)


White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo (Beacon; 2018)


"Camus' Stance on Algeria Still Stokes Debate in France" by Eleanor Beardsley (NPR; Nov. 7, 2013)


The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky (1880)


Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (One World; 2018)


South to a Very Old Place by Albert Murray (Vintage; 1991)


"The limits of anti-racism" by Adolph Reed (2009)

 
Enjoyed this episode? Rate The Gray Area ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts.
Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of The Gray Area. Subscribe in your favorite podcast app.
Support The Gray Area by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts
This episode was made by: 


Producer: Erikk Geannikis


Editor: Amy Drozdowska


Engineer: Patrick Boyd


Editorial Director, Vox Talk: A.M. Hall


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

46 min

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