19 episodes

Anthropological Airwaves is the official podcast of the journal American Anthropologist. Building on the journal’s commitment to four-field, multimodal research, we host conversations about anthropological projects, from fieldwork and publishing to the discipline’s role in public debates. We aim to ask a series of fundamental questions about past, present, and future disciplinary practice, and to learn from those who chart new paths for a more broadly engaged anthropology.

Anthropological Airwaves Anthropological Airwaves

    • Society & Culture

Anthropological Airwaves is the official podcast of the journal American Anthropologist. Building on the journal’s commitment to four-field, multimodal research, we host conversations about anthropological projects, from fieldwork and publishing to the discipline’s role in public debates. We aim to ask a series of fundamental questions about past, present, and future disciplinary practice, and to learn from those who chart new paths for a more broadly engaged anthropology.

    Episode 13 - Care In/Out the Clinic feat. Carolyn Sufrin and Xochitl Marsili-Vargas

    Episode 13 - Care In/Out the Clinic feat. Carolyn Sufrin and Xochitl Marsili-Vargas

    In Episode 13 of Anthropological Airwaves, producer Diego Arispe-Bazan introduces two interviews, one between Penn grad student Josh Franklin and Professor Carolyn Sufrin. They discuss her recent book "Jailcare: Finding the Safety Net for Women Behind Bars" (2017), interspersed with news clips and testimonials on the topic. After a rare recorded quote by Sigmund Freud, Diego returns in the second half of the episode to talk with Xochitl Marsili-Vargas to discuss the ways that psychoanalytic discourse circulates outside of the clinic through questions such as "what you really mean is," the kinds of conversations one might have with strangers, and reflect on the differences between mental health care in Argentina and the United States.

    Transcript: http://www.americananthropologist.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Episode-13-transcript.pdf

    If you enjoyed the episode, please follow our guests' work:
    https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520288683/jailcare
    http://spanport.emory.edu/home/people/faculty/marsilivargas-xochitl.html

    Credits
    Producer, Editor, and Interviewer: Diego Arispe-Bazán
    Interviewer: Josh Franklin
    Co-Editor: Kyle Olson

    Clips and Music
    Bajofondo Tango Club - "Perfume" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gehwbYcrYyc)
    Shaka Senghor - "How Prison Sets Inmates Up for Failure: Racism, Mental Illness, Poverty"(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOTVw2U5gv0)
    Healthcare in America's Prison System (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYcz1Osx8ao)
    ABC15 Arizona - "Arizona's prisons boss found in contempt over inmate care" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZ239GJDl0o)

    Image
    https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:CARE_ICON_COLOR.jpg

    • 32 min
    Episode 12 "Voice, Sound and Democracy"

    Episode 12 "Voice, Sound and Democracy"

    In Episode 12 of Anthropological Airwaves, producer Nooshin Sadeq-Samimi interviews Laura Kunreuther. They cover a range of issues related to how voice and sound figure into the political process, focusing on Kunreuther's monograph "Voicing Subjects: Public Intimacy and Mediation in Kathmandu" and her recent article in Cultural Anthropology "Sounds of Democracy: Performance, Protest, and Political Subjectivity."

    Links to both, as well as a transcript, are below:

    https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520270701/voicing-subjects
    https://journal.culanth.org/index.php/ca/article/view/ca33.1.01

    If you enjoyed the episode, please follow Dr. Kunreuther's work:
    http://anthropology.bard.edu/faculty/profiles.shtml?id=4121738

    Transcript
    http://www.americananthropologist.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Episode-12-Voice-Sound-and-Democracy-transcript.pdf

    Credits
    Producer and Interviewer: Nooshin Sadeq-Samimi
    Co-Editor and Host: Kyle Olson
    Co-Editor: Diego Arispe-Bazán

    Clips and Music
    Byzantine Time Machine - "Glimpses of Kathmandu" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnWVKkfPbwc)
    AP Archive - "Strike, police presence, violence, pro-democracy protest" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I61X4ubbvrA)
    Nepathya - "Yo Jindagani" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xw3HbIHKfds)

    Image
    Cover of Voicing Subjects, Laura Kunreuther, UC Press (2014).

    • 22 min
    Decolonizing Museums in Practice Part 3: Feat. Wayne Modest

    Decolonizing Museums in Practice Part 3: Feat. Wayne Modest

    In this follow-up to our two-part special feature on the 2018 Museum Ethnographer's Group conference "Decolonizing the Museum in Practice", held in April of last year we interview Dr. Wayne Modest, director of the Research Center for Material Culture.

    Hosted by Deborah Thomas and interviewed by Chris Green, Dr. Modest shares with us his thoughts on decolonizing as an ongoing commitment. He emphasizes the great responsibility that curators have to the people, past and present, who are represented in museum collections. In his view, museum research and curation must always be public-facing and must commit to working together with those whose lives are most precarious in the afterlives of colonialism and empire.

    For a full transcript of this episode, please follow this link: http://www.americananthropologist.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Decolonizing-Museums-in-Practice-Part-3-Feat.-Wayne-Modest.pdf

    Credits:
    Introduction: Deborah Thomas
    Interviewer: Chris Green
    Recorder: Kyle Olson
    Producer: Kyle Olson

    Music and found footage:
    KOKOROKO "Abusey Junction // We Out Here" (https://youtu.be/tSv04ylc6To)
    Bob Marley and the Wailers "War"
    (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XHEPoMNP0I)

    Image Caption: The central atrium of the Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam. Straight-view of the barrel-vaulted space from the middle of the room, oriented length-wise with the central staircase in the background. Gallery spaces are visible along top level above the stairs and light streams in from a glass-and-steel half-cylindrical dome at the top.
    Image Credit: http://renthouse.nl/the-tropenmuseum/

    For educational purposes only.

    • 26 min
    Episode 11 "Anthropology and Humanitarianism"

    Episode 11 "Anthropology and Humanitarianism"

    In Episode 11 of Anthropological Airwaves, we speak with Professors Adia Benton of Northwestern University and Miriam Ticktin of The New School about multimodal and public anthropology through the lens of humanitarianism. Benton shows us how visual analysis can be used to plumb the depths of contradictions in humanitarianism, both in its ethos and specific interventions, exposing the white supremacist framework baked into the humanitarian project. Ticktin picks up where Benton leaves off, sharing insights from her work with immigrant and refugee populations in Europe, showing how the same logics are at work in the constitution of and efforts to ameliorate the "Refugee Crisis" in Europe. These conversations both challenge us to think more deeply about our commitments to our interlocutors and our various audiences, disciplinary, public, or otherwise.

    If you enjoy the episode, please follow Dr. Benton's and Dr. Ticktin's work:
    https://twitter.com/Ethnography911
    https://americanethnologist.org/features/interviews/ae-interviews-miriam-ticktin-innocence-ethnography-and-politics-beyond-the-human

    For a transcript of this episode, please follow this link: http://www.americananthropologist.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Episode-11-transcript-1.pdf

    Credits
    Producer: Nooshin Sadeq-Samimi
    Editor and Host: Kyle Olson
    Interviewers: Sarah Rendell and Sharon Jacobs

    Music
    Takuya Kuroda - "Rising Son" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_mUymaxWmMw)

    Image
    ABC News Still Depicting Salma Hayek and a Sierra Leonean baby (part of the sequence discussed in Adia's interview)

    • 40 min
    Episode 10 "Collaborative Digital Archaeology"

    Episode 10 "Collaborative Digital Archaeology"

    In Episode 10 of Anthropological Airwaves, we talk with Tiffany Earley-Spadoni (University of Central Florida) and Stefani Crabtree (Penn State) about digital archaeology, covering both its more humanistic and computational modes. Earley-Spadoni shows us how collaboration with local community stakeholders and colleagues abroad can produce rich digital narratives, allowing people to tell and hear stories about places of memory in multiple languages alongside rich multimedia content. Crabtree argues for the importance of archaeology for solving contemporary problems, drawing on her research with food-web modeling in the US Southwest, which has considerable implications for modern-day resource management and climate change mitigation. She also demonstrates that archaeologists need to think more expansively about collaboration, particularly with whom we collaborate, if we want the results of our work to matter for a broader audience.

    If you enjoy the episode, please follow Dr. Earley-Spadoni's and Dr. Crabtree's work:
    http://history.cah.ucf.edu/faculty-staff/?id=1391
    https://projects.cah.ucf.edu/infinitearmenias/
    https://stefanicrabtree.com/

    For a transcript of this episode, please follow this link: http://www.americananthropologist.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/AnthroAirwaves-Episode-10-Transcript.pdf

    Credits
    Interviewer, Producer, and Editor: Kyle Olson

    Music
    Khruangbin "Maria Tambien" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hlGqj3ImQI)

    Image
    http://thespeaker.co/blogs/3d-printing-daesh-will-recreate-isis-destroyed/

    • 29 min
    "Decolonizing Museums in Practice with the Museum Ethnographers Group" Part 2: Stories and Objects

    "Decolonizing Museums in Practice with the Museum Ethnographers Group" Part 2: Stories and Objects

    In this two-part special feature we think with the Museum Ethnographer's Group conference "Decolonizing the Museum in Practice", held in April of this year (http://www.museumethnographersgroup.org.uk/en/conference/422-2018-conference-decolonising-the-museum-in-practice.html). The second part focuses on the stories and objects around which much decolonizing work revolves and features a read paper by JC Niala and an interview with Laura Peers. Niala relates to us a story that illustrates, among many other insights, what is lost when indigenous perspectives are not included or even considered in museum exhibits; Peers shows us what the process of building relationships between museums and indigenous communities might look like and the challenges that must be overcome to successfully share access to and ultimately governance of museum collections.

    Hosted by Deborah Thomas and with interviews conducted by Chris and Cassandra Green, this two-part series on “decolonizing museums” examines the past, present, and future(s) of museum practice. Given often sordid collection histories and the strained at best or non-existent at worst relations that museums have had with communities of origin, these interviews address how we might face head-on the legacies of colonialism and empire.

    For a full transcript of this episode, please follow this link: http://www.americananthropologist.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/MEG-Episode-2-transcript-1.pdf

    Credits:
    Introduction/Conclusion: Deborah Thomas
    Interviewer: Chris Green
    Recorder: Cassandra Green
    Producers: Kyle Olson and Nooshin Sadegh-Samimi
    Assistant Producer: Chris Green

    Music and found footage:
    Gingee "Decolonize your Mind" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYQJkgZNzdk)
    The University of Oxford "Inside the Pitt Rivers Museum" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukwnYt0E5Co)
    Decolonize This Place Video "Anti-Columbus Day: Decolonize This Museum" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mY0mQUWO9_Q)
    Singing Haida Song with Raven and Alex (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnbT14i8zUg)

    Image Caption: The central gallery of the Pitt Rivers Museum at Oxford University, UK. View from the upper mezzanine showing the gallery length-wise. The many glass cases containing artifacts from all over the world on and around the ground floor are clearly visible, while two people look on in the lower foreground.

    • 43 min

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