125 episodes

Created by three guys who love BSD, we cover the latest news and have an extensive series of tutorials, as well as interviews with various people from all areas of the BSD community. It also serves as a platform for support and questions. We love and advocate FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, DragonFlyBSD and TrueOS. Our show aims to be helpful and informative for new users that want to learn about them, but still be entertaining for the people who are already pros.
The show airs on Wednesdays at 2:00PM (US Eastern time) and the edited version is usually up the following day.

BSD Now Allan Jude

    • Tech News

Created by three guys who love BSD, we cover the latest news and have an extensive series of tutorials, as well as interviews with various people from all areas of the BSD community. It also serves as a platform for support and questions. We love and advocate FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, DragonFlyBSD and TrueOS. Our show aims to be helpful and informative for new users that want to learn about them, but still be entertaining for the people who are already pros.
The show airs on Wednesdays at 2:00PM (US Eastern time) and the edited version is usually up the following day.

    363: Traditional Unix toolchains

    363: Traditional Unix toolchains

    FreeBSD Q2 Quarterly Status report of 2020, Traditional Unix Toolchains, BastilleBSD 0.7 released, Finding meltdown on DragonflyBSD, and more


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    FreeBSD Quarterly Report


    This report will be covering FreeBSD related projects between April and June, and covers a diverse set of topics ranging from kernel updates over userland and ports, as well to third-party work.
    Some highlights picked with the roll of a d100 include, but are not limited to, the ability to forcibly unmounting UFS when the underlying media becomes inaccessible, added preliminary support for Bluetooth Low Energy, a introduction to the FreeBSD Office Hours, and a repository of software collections called potluck to be installed with the pot utility, as well as many many more things.
    As a little treat, readers can also get a rare report from the quarterly team.
    Finally, on behalf of the quarterly team, I would like to extend my deepest appreciation and thank you to salvadore@, who decided to take down his shingle. His contributions not just the quarterly reports themselves, but also the surrounding tooling to many-fold ease the work, are immeasurable.





    Traditional Unix Toolchains


    Older Unix systems tend to be fairly uniform in how they handle the so-called 'toolchain' for creating binaries. This blog will give a quick overview of the toolchain pipeline for Unix systems that follow the V7 tradition (which evolved along with Unix, a topic for a separate blog maybe).
    Unix is a pipeline based system, either physically or logically. One program takes input, process the data and produces output. The input and output have some interface they obey, usually text-based. The Unix toolchain is no different.





    News Roundup

    Bastille Day 2020 : v0.7 released


    This release matures the project from 0.6.x -> 0.7.x. Continued testing and bug fixes are proving Bastille capable for a range of use-cases. New (experimental) features are examples of innovation from community contribution and feedback. Thank you.





    Beastie Bits


    Finding meltdown on DragonFly
    NetBSD Server Outage
    ***


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    Feedback/Questions


    Vincent - Gnome 3 question
    Malcolm - ZFS question
    Hassan - Video question


    For those that watch on youtube, don’t forget to subscribe to our new YouTube Channel if you want updates when we post them on YT






    Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv
    ***

    • 34 min
    362: 2.11-BSD restoration

    362: 2.11-BSD restoration

    Interview with Warner Losh about Unix history, the 2.11-BSD restoration project, the Unix heritage society, proper booting, and what devmatch is.


    Interview - Warner Losh - imp@freebsd.org / @bsdimp

    BSD 2.11 restoration project

    Tarsnap


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    Special Guest: Warner Losh.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    361: Function-based MicroVM

    361: Function-based MicroVM

    Emulex: The Cheapest 10gbe for Your Homelab, In Search of 2.11BSD, as released, Fakecracker: NetBSD as a Function Based MicroVM, First powerpc64 snapshots available for OpenBSD, OPNsense 20.1.8 released, and more.


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    Emulex: The Cheapest 10gbe for Your Homelab


    Years ago, the hunt for the cheapest 10gbe NICs resulted in buying Mellanox ConnectX-2 single-port 10gbe network cards from eBay for around $10. Nowadays those cards have increased in cost to around $20-30. While still cheap, not quite the cheapest. There are now alternatives!
    Before diving into details, let’s get something very clear. If you want the absolute simplest plug-and-play 10gbe LAN for your homelab, pay the extra for Mellanox. If you’re willing to go hands-on, do some simple manual configuration and installation, read on for my experiences with Emulex 10gbe NICs.
    Emulex NICs can often be had for around $15 on eBay, sometimes even cheaper. I recently picked up a set of 4 of these cards, which came bundled with 6 SFP+ 10g-SR modules for a grand total of $47.48. Considering I can usually find SFP+ modules for about $5/ea, these alone were worth $30.



    I have also tried some Solarflare cards that I found cheap, they work ok, but are pickier about optics, and tend to be focused on low-latency, so often don’t manage to saturate the full 10 gbps, topping out around 8 gbps.
    I have been using fs.com for optics, patch cables, and DACs. I find DACs are usually cheaper if you are just going between a server and a switch in the same rack, or direct between 2 servers.
    ***



    In Search of 2.11BSD, as released


    Almost all of the BSD releases have been well preserved. If you want to find 1BSD, or 2BSD or 4.3-TAHOE BSD you can find them online with little fuss. However, if you search for 2.11BSD, you'll find it easily enough, but it won't be the original. You'll find either the latest patched version (2.11BSD pl 469), or one of the earlier popular version (pl 430 is popular). You can even find the RetroBSD project which used 2.11BSD as a starting point to create systems for tiny mips-based PIC controllers. You'll find every single patch that's been issued for the system.





    News Roundup

    Fakecracker: NetBSD as a Function Based MicroVM


    In November 2018 AWS published an Open Source tool called Firecracker, mostly a virtual machine monitor relying on KVM, a small sized Linux kernel, and a stripped down version of Qemu. What baffled me was the speed at which the virtual machine would fire up and run the service. The whole process is to be compared to a container, but safer, as it does not share the kernel nor any resource, it is a separate and dedicated virtual machine.
    If you want to learn more on Firecracker‘s internals, here’s a very well put article.





    First powerpc64 snapshots available for OpenBSD


    Since we reported the first bits of powerpc64 support going into the tree on 16 May, work has progressed at a steady pace, resulting in snapshots now being available for this platform.
    So, if you have a POWER9 system idling around, go to your nearest mirror and fetch this snapshot. Keep in mind that as this is still very early days, very little handholding is available - you are basically on your own.





    OPNsense 20.1.8 released


    Sorry about the delay while we chased a race condition in the updates back to an issue with the latest FreeBSD package manager updates. For now we reverted to our current version but all relevant third party packages have been updated as updates became available over the last weeks, e.g. cURL and Python, and hostapd / wpa_supplicant amongst others.





    Beastie Bits


    Old School Disk Partitioning
    Nomad BSD 1.3.2 Released
    Chai-Fi




    Tarsnap


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    • 1 hr 2 min
    360: Full circle

    360: Full circle

    Chasing a bad commit, New FreeBSD Core Team elected, Getting Started with NetBSD on the Pinebook Pro, FreeBSD on the Intel 10th Gen i3 NUC, pf table size check and change, and more.


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    Chasing a bad commit


    While working on a big project where multiple teams merge their feature branches frequently into a release Git branch, developers often run into situations where they find that some of their work have been either removed, modified or affected by someone else's work accidentally. It can happen in smaller teams as well. Two features could have been working perfectly fine until they got merged together and broke something. That's a highly possible case. There are many other cases which could cause such hard to understand and subtle bugs which even continuous integration (CI) systems running the entire test suite of our projects couldn't catch.
    We are not going to discuss how such subtle bugs can get into our release branch because that's just a wild territory out there. Instead, we can definitely discuss about how to find a commit that deviated from an expected outcome of a certain feature. The deviation could be any behaviour of our code that we can measure distinctively — either good or bad in general.





    New FreeBSD Core Team Elected


    The FreeBSD Project is pleased to announce the completion of the 2020 Core Team election. Active committers to the project have elected your Eleventh FreeBSD Core Team.!




    Baptiste Daroussin (bapt)
    Ed Maste (emaste)
    George V. Neville-Neil (gnn)
    Hiroki Sato (hrs)
    Kyle Evans (kevans)
    Mark Johnston (markj)
    Scott Long (scottl)
    Sean Chittenden (seanc)
    Warner Losh (imp)
    ***


    News Roundup

    Getting Started with NetBSD on the Pinebook Pro


    If you buy a Pinebook Pro now, it comes with Manjaro Linux on the internal eMMC storage. Let’s install NetBSD instead!
    The easiest way to get started is to buy a decent micro-SD card (what sort of markings it should have is a science of its own, by the way) and install NetBSD on that. On a warm boot (i.e. when rebooting a running system), the micro-SD card has priority compared to the eMMC, so the system will boot from there.



    A FreeBSD developer has borrowed some of the NetBSD code to get audio working on RockPro64 and Pinebook Pro: https://twitter.com/kernelnomicon/status/1282790609778905088
    ***



    FreeBSD on the Intel 10th Gen i3 NUC


    I have ended up with some 10th Gen i3 NUC's (NUC10i3FNH to be specific) to put to work in my testbed. These are quite new devices, the build date on the boxes is 13APR2020. Before I figure out what their true role is (one of them might have to run linux) I need to install FreeBSD -CURRENT and see how performance and hardware support is.





    pf table size check and change


    Did you know there’s a default size limit to pf’s state table? I did not, but it makes sense that there is one. If for some reason you bump into this limit (difficult for home use, I’d think), here’s how you change it
    There is a table-entries limit specified, you can see current settings with
    'pfctl -s all'. You can adjust the limits in the /etc/pf.conf file
    containing the rules with a line like this near the top:
    set limit table-entries 100000



    In the original mail thread, there is mention of the FreeBSD sysctl net.pf.request_maxcount, which controls the maximum number of entries that can be sent as a single ioctl(). This allows the user to adjust the memory limit for how big of a list the kernel is willing to allocate memory for.
    ***



    Beastie Bits


    tmux and bhyve
    Azure and FreeBSD
    Groff Tutorial
    ***
    ###Tarsnap
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    Tarsnap Mastery


    Feedback/Questions


    Chris - ZFS Question
    Patrick - Tarsnap
    Pin - pkgsrc
    ***
    Send

    • 42 min
    359: Throwaway Browser

    359: Throwaway Browser

    Throw-Away Browser on FreeBSD With "pot" within 5 minutes, OmniOS as OpenBSD guest with bhyve, BSD vs Linux distro development, My FreeBSD Laptop Build, FreeBSD CURRENT Binary Upgrades, and more.


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    Throw-Away Browser on FreeBSD With "pot" Within 5 Minutes


    pot is a great and relatively new jail management tool. It offers DevOps style provisioning and can even be used to provide Docker-like, scalable cloud services together with nomad and consul (more about this in Orchestrating jails with nomad and pot).





    OpenBSD guest with bhyve - OmniOS


    Today I will be creating a OpenBSD guest via bhyve on OmniOS. I will also be adding a Pass Through Ethernet Controller so I can have a multi-homed guest that will serve as a firewall/router.
    This post will cover setting up bhyve on OmniOS, so it will also be a good introduction to bhyve. As well, I look into OpenBSD’s uEFI boot loader so if you have had trouble with this, then you are in the right place.





    News Roundup

    BSD versus Linux distribution development


    Q: Comparing-apples-to-BSDs asks: I was reading one of the old articles from the archive. One of the things mentioned was how the BSDs have a distinct approach in terms of packaging the base system relative to userland apps, and that the Linux distros at the time were not following the same practice. Are there Linux distros that have adopted the same approach in modern times? If not, are there technical limitations that are preventing them from doing so, such as some distros supporting multiple kernel versions maybe?
    DistroWatch answers: In the article mentioned above, I made the observation that Linux distributions tend to take one of two approaches when it comes to packaging software. Generally a Linux distribution will either offer a rolling release, where virtually all packages are regularly upgraded to their latest stable releases, or a fixed release where almost all packages are kept at a set version number and only receive bug fixes for the life cycle of the distribution. Projects like Arch Linux and Void are popular examples of rolling, always-up-to-date distributions while Fedora and Ubuntu offer fixed platforms.




    My FreeBSD Laptop Build

    I have always liked Thinkpad hardware and when I started to do more commuting I decided I needed something that had a decent sized screen but fit well on a bus. Luckily about this time Lenovo gave me a nice gift in the Thinkpad X390. Its basically the famous X2xx series but with a 13” screen and smaller bezel.
    So with this laptop I figured it was time to actually put the docs together on how I got my FreeBSD workstation working on it. I will here in the near future have another post that will cover this for HardenedBSD as well since the steps are similar but have a few extra gotchas due to the extra hardening.




    FreeBSD CURRENT Binary Upgrades


    Disclaimer
    This proof-of-concept is not a publication of FreeBSD.
    Description
    up.bsd.lv is a proof-of-concept of binary updates for FreeBSD/amd64 CURRENT/HEAD to facilitate the exhaustive testing of FreeBSD and the bhyve hypervisor and OpenZFS 2.0 specifically. Updates are based on the SVN revisions of official FreeBSD Release Engineering bi-monthly snapshots.





    Tarsnap


    This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups.


    Feedback/Questions


    Karl - pfsense
    Val - esxi question
    lars - openbsd router hardware



    Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv

    • 43 min
    358: OpenBSD Kubernetes Clusters

    358: OpenBSD Kubernetes Clusters

    Yubikey-agent on FreeBSD, Managing Kubernetes clusters from OpenBSD, History of FreeBSD part 1, Running Jitsi-Meet in a FreeBSD Jail, Command Line Bug Hunting in FreeBSD, Game of Github, Wireguard official merged into OpenBSD, and more


    NOTES
    This episode of BSDNow is brought to you by Tarsnap


    Headlines

    yubikey-agent on FreeBSD


    Some time ago Filippo Valsorda wrote yubikey-agent, seamless SSH agent for YubiKeys. I really like YubiKeys and worked on the FreeBSD support for U2F in Chromium and pyu2f, getting yubikey-agent ported looked like an interesting project. It took some hacking to make it work but overall it wasn’t hard. Following is the roadmap on how to get it set up on FreeBSD. The actual details depend on your system (as you will see)





    Manage Kubernetes clusters from OpenBSD


    This should work with OpenBSD 6.7. I write this while the source tree is locked for release, so even if I use -current this is as close as -current gets to -release
    Update 2020-06-05: we now have a port for kubectl. So, at least in -current things get a bit easier.





    News Roundup

    History of FreeBSD Part 1: Unix and BSD


    FreeBSD, a free and open-source Unix-like operating system has been around since 1993. However, its origins are directly linked to that of BSD, and further back, those of Unix. During this History of FreeBSD series, we will talk about how Unix came to be, and how Berkeley’s Unix developed at Bell Labs.





    Running Jitsi-Meet in a FreeBSD Jail


    Due to the situation with COVID-19 that also lead to people being confined to their homes in South Africa as well, we decided to provide a (freely usable of course) Jitsi Meet instance to the community being hosted in South Africa on our FreeBSD environment.
    That way, communities in South Africa and beyond have a free alternative to the commercial conferencing solutions with sometimes dubious security and privacy histories and at the same time improved user experience due to the lower latency of local hosting.



    Grafana for Jitsi-Meet
    ***



    Command Line Bug Hunting in FreeBSD


    FreeBSD uses bugzilla for tracking bugs, taking feature requests, regressions and issues in the Operating System. The web interface for bugzilla is okay, but if you want to do a lot of batch operations it is slow to deal with. We are planning to run a bugsquash on July 11th and that really needs some tooling to help any hackers that show up process the giant bug list we have.





    Beastie Bits


    Game of Github
    + Wireguard official merged into OpenBSD
    ***


    Tarsnap


    This weeks episode of BSDNow was sponsored by our friends at Tarsnap, the only secure online backup you can trust your data to. Even paranoids need backups.


    Feedback/Questions


    Florian : Lua for $HOME
    Kevin : FreeBSD Source Question
    Tom : HomeLabs



    Send questions, comments, show ideas/topics, or stories you want mentioned on the show to feedback@bsdnow.tv

    • 43 min

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