233 episodes

The Lauterpacht Centre for International Law is the scholarly home of International law at the University of Cambridge. The Centre, founded by Sir Elihu Lauterpacht QC in 1983, serves as a forum for the discussion and development of international law and is one of the specialist law centres of the Faculty of Law.

The Centre holds weekly lectures on topical issues of international law by leading practitioners and academics.

For more information see the LCIL website at http://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/

LCIL International Law Seminar Series Cambridge University

    • News

The Lauterpacht Centre for International Law is the scholarly home of International law at the University of Cambridge. The Centre, founded by Sir Elihu Lauterpacht QC in 1983, serves as a forum for the discussion and development of international law and is one of the specialist law centres of the Faculty of Law.

The Centre holds weekly lectures on topical issues of international law by leading practitioners and academics.

For more information see the LCIL website at http://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/

    • video
    LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Regular War, Humanitarianism, and the Difference Sovereignty Makes' - Prof Pablo Kalmanovitz, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas, División de Estudios Internacionales, Mexico City

    LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Regular War, Humanitarianism, and the Difference Sovereignty Makes' - Prof Pablo Kalmanovitz, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas, División de Estudios Internacionales, Mexico City

    The distinctive vocabulary and broad principles of the modern laws of war developed within a broader project that from early modernity spelled out the nature and powers of state sovereignty. This lecture focuses on the Enlightenment theorists of “regular war.” It shows how their project of limiting war through law was anchored in a capacious conception of sovereign power, in which reason of state appeared as a restraining force through the vehicle of the law of nations.

    This Enlightenment project of regular war is contrasted with late-19th century humanitarianism, which had serious misgivings about reason of state and sovereignty itself. Restraint through humanitarian action was possible only with state support, but it resulted from neutral rescue action and moral condemnation.

    The lecture shows how these two conflicting conceptions of restraint came together in the first codified instruments of the laws of war, and how they are still present in the law of armed conflict. It concludes by discussing some implications of this genealogical analysis for contemporary debates on the convergence of international humanitarian, human rights, and criminal law.

    Pablo Kalmanovitz is research professor and head of the International Studies Division at CIDE, in Mexico City, and general editor of the Yearbook of International Humanitarian Law. He has held permanent or visiting positions at the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, the European University Institute, Yale University, McGill University, and the University of Ulster. His research focuses on historical and theoretical aspects of the international regulation of armed force, on which he has published numerous articles and book chapters. His book The Laws of War in International Thought was published by Oxford University Press in 2020.

    • 40 min
    • video
    International Law and Political Engagement (ILPE) series: In Conversation with Prof Umut Özsu: 'On History, Theory, and International Law'

    International Law and Political Engagement (ILPE) series: In Conversation with Prof Umut Özsu: 'On History, Theory, and International Law'

    A series of conversations on international legal scholarship, political engagement and the transformative potential of academia. Each conversation is chaired by Francisco José Quintana and Marina Veličković and centres around a theme, concept or a method and their relationship to political movements, struggles and margins from which they have emerged and within (and for) which they have emancipatory potential.

    This conversation will explore the significance, possibilities, and limits of researching international law from a “history and theory” approach. The distinctiveness of international legal analysis to understand crucial developments from decolonization to neoliberalism, and the political nature and economic foundations of legal form and legal formalism will serve as our starting points. The event will last one hour. Marina and Francisco will lead the conversation for ~40 minutes after which they will pass the pleasure and responsibility on to the audience.

    Umut Özsu is Associate Professor at the Department of Law and Legal Studies at Carleton University. He is a scholar of public international law, the history and theory of international law, and Marxist critiques of law, rights, and the state. He is the author of Formalizing Displacement: International Law and Population Transfers (Oxford University Press, 2015), and is currently finalizing Completing Humanity: The International Law of Decolonization, 1960–82 (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming). He is also co-editor of the Research Handbook on Law and Marxism (Edward Elgar, forthcoming) and The Extraterritoriality of Law: History, Theory, Politics (Routledge, 2019), as well as several journal symposia.

    • 59 min
    • video
    LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Race & COVID-19' - Professor Matiangai Sirleaf, University of Maryland

    LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Race & COVID-19' - Professor Matiangai Sirleaf, University of Maryland

    Lecture summary: This talk uses the novel coronavirus pandemic as an entry point to explore the intersections between race and global health. The pandemic is simultaneously reviving stereotypical colonial imaginations about disease directionality, but also challenging racialized hierarchies of diseases. This lecture illuminates how the racialization of diseases is reflected in historic and ongoing United States’ public health law policy as well as the global health law regime. By demonstrating the close relationship between often separately treated areas this lecture clarifies underlying currents in global health and public health law and policy that stem from fears of the racialized other. Rendering these intersections visible creates avenues for rethinking and reshaping both theory and praxis toward anti-subordination efforts.

    Matiangai Sirleaf is the Nathan Patz Professor of Law at the University of Maryland School of Law. Professor Sirleaf writes and teaches in the areas of global public health law, public international law, international human rights law, international criminal law, post-conflict and transitional justice and criminal law. She recently joined the faculty of the University of Maryland School of Law as a professor of law. Professor Sirleaf previously served as an associate professor of law at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, as an assistant professor of law at the University of Baltimore School of Law and as a Sharswood Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

    • 40 min
    • video
    Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lecture 2021: 'On Dignity' (Part 3): 'Dignity and Indignity in the South African Toilet Wars' - Professor Susan Marks, London School of Economics

    Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lecture 2021: 'On Dignity' (Part 3): 'Dignity and Indignity in the South African Toilet Wars' - Professor Susan Marks, London School of Economics

    The Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lecture is an annual three-part lecture series given in Cambridge to commemorate the unique contribution to the development of international law of Sir Hersch Lauterpacht. These lectures are given annually by a person of eminence in the field of international law. This year's lecture will be given by Professor Susan Marks, Professor of International Law, London School of Economics.

    6 pm Tuesday 2 March (Part 1): 'Dignity as a Worldly Concept'

    6 pm Wednesday 3 March (Part 2): 'The Idea of Human Dignity'

    6 pm Thursday 4 March (Part 3): 'Dignity and Indignity in the South African Toilet Wars'

    Lecture summary: These lectures explore dignity as a worldly phenomenon that is not just an idea, but also a social practice and lived experience. We say that dignity is a right, or a foundational concept for human rights, yet we know that, in reality, it is a privilege enjoyed by some of us more than others and all of us at some times of our lives more than at others. How are we to understand asymmetries in the distribution of dignity? What can we learn by approaching dignity from the perspective of the presumptively undignified? When dignity is not simply denied but refused, can we then make out a different, defiant dignity with a different relationship to indignity?

    Professor Susan Marks joined the LSE in 2010 as Professor of International Law. She previously taught at King’s College London and, prior to that, at the University of Cambridge, where she was a fellow of Emmanuel College. Her work attempts to bring insights from the radical tradition to the study of international law and human rights.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    • video
    Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lecture 2021: 'On Dignity' (Part 2): 'The Idea of Human Dignity' - Professor Susan Marks, London School of Economics

    Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lecture 2021: 'On Dignity' (Part 2): 'The Idea of Human Dignity' - Professor Susan Marks, London School of Economics

    The Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lecture is an annual three-part lecture series given in Cambridge to commemorate the unique contribution to the development of international law of Sir Hersch Lauterpacht. These lectures are given annually by a person of eminence in the field of international law. This year's lecture will be given by Professor Susan Marks, Professor of International Law, London School of Economics.

    Lecture summary: These lectures explore dignity as a worldly phenomenon that is not just an idea, but also a social practice and lived experience. We say that dignity is a right, or a foundational concept for human rights, yet we know that, in reality, it is a privilege enjoyed by some of us more than others and all of us at some times of our lives more than at others. How are we to understand asymmetries in the distribution of dignity? What can we learn by approaching dignity from the perspective of the presumptively undignified? When dignity is not simply denied but refused, can we then make out a different, defiant dignity with a different relationship to indignity?

    Professor Susan Marks joined the LSE in 2010 as Professor of International Law. She previously taught at King’s College London and, prior to that, at the University of Cambridge, where she was a fellow of Emmanuel College. Her work attempts to bring insights from the radical tradition to the study of international law and human rights.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    • video
    Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lecture 2021: 'On Dignity' (Part 1): 'Dignity as a Worldly Concept' - Professor Susan Marks, London School of Economics

    Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lecture 2021: 'On Dignity' (Part 1): 'Dignity as a Worldly Concept' - Professor Susan Marks, London School of Economics

    The Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lecture is an annual three-part lecture series given in Cambridge to commemorate the unique contribution to the development of international law of Sir Hersch Lauterpacht. These lectures are given annually by a person of eminence in the field of international law. This year's lecture will be given by Professor Susan Marks, Professor of International Law, London School of Economics.

    Lecture summary: These lectures explore dignity as a worldly phenomenon that is not just an idea, but also a social practice and lived experience. We say that dignity is a right, or a foundational concept for human rights, yet we know that, in reality, it is a privilege enjoyed by some of us more than others and all of us at some times of our lives more than at others. How are we to understand asymmetries in the distribution of dignity? What can we learn by approaching dignity from the perspective of the presumptively undignified? When dignity is not simply denied but refused, can we then make out a different, defiant dignity with a different relationship to indignity?

    Professor Susan Marks joined the LSE in 2010 as Professor of International Law. She previously taught at King’s College London and, prior to that, at the University of Cambridge, where she was a fellow of Emmanuel College. Her work attempts to bring insights from the radical tradition to the study of international law and human rights.

    • 1 hr 1 min

Top Podcasts In News

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by Cambridge University