7 episodes

A podcast about movies from the makers of Letterboxd, the social network for film lovers.

The Letterboxd Show Letterboxd

    • TV & Film

A podcast about movies from the makers of Letterboxd, the social network for film lovers.

    7: Ghibli Magic Moments

    7: Ghibli Magic Moments

    Since the roll-out of Studio Ghibli films on Netflix and HBO Max this year, there’s been an explosion of Letterboxd activity around the famed studio’s films. Our Ghibli-loving guests couldn’t be happier. David Jenkins (Little White Lies), Tasha Robinson (Polygon) and Adam Kempenaar (Filmspotting) share their Ghibli obsessions and discuss whether to “sub or dub”. Letterboxd members phone in with their favs. Plus: Little White Lies turns 15.

    Links


    David Jenkins’ review of My Neighbor Totoro
    Polygon’s best Studio Ghibli scenes survey
    @c0mmunicants’ Ghibli tweet
    The Official Letterboxd Top 250
    Letterboxd members’ top 20 favorite comfort films
    Adam’s daughter Sophie on Letterboxd
    Mami Sunada’s The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness
    Our Q&A with the hosts of Ghibliotheque

    This episode was recorded in Chicago, London and Auckland and edited by Morgan Avery. Podcast artwork by Ann Davenport. Theme music is ‘Hitchcock’ by The Phoenix Foundation. Leave a voice message for Aneesh Chaganty, our next guest, or tell us the ‘so bad it’s good’ film you’ve been rewatching in isolation for an upcoming episode.

    We recorded this episode as the news of George Floyd’s death by police brutality was emerging, and held it back in order to amplify Black voices and stories. Racism has no place on Letterboxd. Here are some ideas for activism; here are more; and more. We are donating all proceeds from screenings of Josephine Decker’s Shirley via our virtual screening link (available to US members only) to BIPOC film non-profit Firelight Media. Black Lives Matter.

    • 1 hr 17 min
    6: Black Life on Film

    6: Black Life on Film

    This episode is dedicated to films about the Black experience. Our guest is Letterboxd member Adam Davie, creator of the extensive Black Life on Film list. Adam explains why he has spent three years creating the list and why it includes “the good, the bad and the ugly as it relates to the Black experience”.

    Links


    Driving Miss Daisy (Bruce Beresford, 1989)
    The Story of a Three-Day Pass (Melvin Van Peebles, 1968)
    Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (Rodney Rothman/Peter Ramsey/Bob Persichetti, 2018)
    Do the Right Thing (Spike Lee, 1989)
    I Am Not Your Negro (Raoul Peck, 2016)
    13th (Ava DuVernay, 2016)
    Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017)
    LA 92 (T.J. Martin/Daniel Lindsay, 2017)
    Support The Girls (Andrew Bujalski, 2018)
    The High Note (Nisha Ganatra, 2020)
    Beyond the Lights (Gina Prince-Bythewood, 2014)
    The Wound (John Trengove, 2017)
    Rafiki (Wanuri Kahiu, 2018)
    Attack the Block (Joe Cornish, 2011)
    I Am Legend (Francis Lawrence, 2007)
    If Beale Street Could Talk (Barry Jenkins, 2017)
    Black Dynamite (Scott Sanders, 2009)
    Miami Connection (Y.K. Kim/Woo-sang Park, 1987)

    This episode was recorded in Pittsburgh, PA and Auckland, NZ and edited by Morgan Avery. Our podcast artwork is by Ann Davenport and our theme music is ‘Hitchcock’ by The Phoenix Foundation. Leave a voice message telling us your favorite Studio Ghibli film, or a ‘so bad it’s good’ film you’ve been rewatching in isolation for our upcoming episodes.

    Listeners in the US can watch Josephine Decker’s Shirley via our virtual screening room—we’re donating all proceeds to film non-profit Firelight Media. For other links, resources and places to donate in the fight for justice, here are some anti-racism resources for white people. This Letterboxd review of I Am Not Your Negro also contains useful links. Black Lives Matter.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    5: Spielberg Special

    5: Spielberg Special

    Our cast of Steven Spielberg fans somehow manage to find new things to say about the films of the highest-grossing director of all time, and marvel at how his movies feel more potent than ever in the time of coronavirus. Guests: Chris Evangelista from SlashFilm’s 21st Century Spielberg podcast, comedian/writer Gabriel Gundacker of “I Wanna meet Richard Dreyfuss” fame, and Letterboxd’s West Coast editor Dominic Corry.

    Links

    Steven Spielberg’s filmography.

    1993: a big year for Spielberg, as chronicled by Ed Power in The Independent.

    Watch the moment Spielberg is not nominated for a Best Director Oscar for Jaws.

    Susan Lacy’s 2017 Spielberg documentary.

    Spielberg at Cannes in 1975.

    Composer John Williams (and Rolling Stone film critic David Fear on his work in Catch Me if You Can).

    The Spielberg Quarantine Challenge:


    A.I. Artificial Intelligence (Dominic)
    Lincoln (Chris)
    E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (Gabriel)
    The Indiana Jones box set (Gemma)

    Quarantine Pick-Me-Ups:


    The Last Days of Disco (Dominic)
    The Rocketeer (Chris)
    Blazing Saddles (Gabriel)
    The Muppet Movie (Gemma)

    Filmmakers on the Internet:


    Vulture’s conversations with directors in insolation, including Reuben Ostland and Claire Denis (Gemma)
    Mary Neely (Dominic)
    Settling the Score podcast (Gabriel)
    SlashFilm’s Quarantine Stream (Chris)

    Recorded in Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Auckland. Edited by Morgan Avery. Podcast artwork by Ann Davenport. Theme music: ‘Hitchcock’ by The Phoenix Foundation. Leave a voice message telling us your favorite quarantine rewatch for our next episode (don’t forget to introduce yourself and please record in a quiet place too).

    • 1 hr 34 min
    4: Lockdown Thirst

    4: Lockdown Thirst

    Has lockdown got you thirsty? This is the episode you need. Inspired by film writer Justine Peres Smith’s popular ‘Best Horny Movies for Quarantine’ list, Letterboxd editor Gemma Gracewood, Montreal-based Smith, and The Black List’s Kate Hagen dive deep into several erotic thrillers from the past two decades: Jane Campion’s In The Cut, Park Chan-wook’s The Handmaiden and Yann Gonzalez’s Knife + Heart. And we ask: where’s all the hot sex in Western film these days? Plus: Cronenberg, PTA, Roeg, Marilyn Monroe and more.

    Links

    Horny movies:


    Kate’s Essential Erotic Thrillers and 365 Sex Scenes
    The Black List
    In The Cut
    Justine’s 2018 re-examination of In The Cut for Little White Lies
    God’s Own Country
    The Handmaiden
    Knife + Heart
    Crash
    Don't Look Now
    Inherent Vice
    Damage
    Bound
    Kate’s Playboy article

    Quarantine recommendations:


    Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (Justine)
    Peggy Sue Got Married (Kate)
    Ratatouille (Gemma)

    Filmmakers on social:


    K. Austin Collins’ Shut-in Movie Club and Letterboxd profile (Justine)
    Vidiots and video stores everywhere (Kate)
    Joss Ackland’s #ReadaLetter (Gemma)

    Edited by Morgan Avery. Podcast artwork by Ann Davenport. Theme music: ‘Hitchcock’ by The Phoenix Foundation. Leave a voice message telling us your favorite Steven Spielberg film for our next episode.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    3: Big Cities, Empty Streets

    3: Big Cities, Empty Streets

    Nostalgic for recent life, Letterboxd editor Gemma Gracewood, our West Coast editor Dominic Corry and New York-based freelance film critic Susannah Gruder celebrate movies set in big cities while we stay home to save lives. We discuss how directors like Michael Mann, Susan Seidelman and Richard Linklater move through cityscapes, and we see New York through newcomers’ eyes in Eliza Hittman’s stunning new film.

    P.S. Join our L.A. Showdown: nominate your favorite films set in the City of Angels.

    Links

    City films for empty streets: 


    Crossing Delancey
    Vanilla Sky, The Quiet Earth and Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen
    Desperately Seeking Susan
    Heat, Collateral
    Before Sunset
    Never Rarely Sometimes Always
    The Omega Man, Woodstock
    Light Sleeper, Three Days of the Condor
    Miracle Mile
    Bright Wall/Dark Room’s list of obscure recommendations
    Babylon incl. the engagement-party scene
    Art House Online

    Quarantine recommendations:


    Frederico Fellini’s Nights of Cabiria and Bob Fosse’s Sweet Charity (Susannah)
    Robert Zemeckis’s Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Alfred Hitchcock’s To Catch a Thief (Dominic)
    Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights (Gemma)

    Filmmakers on the Internet:


    Ritesh Batra’s scriptwriting chats (Gemma)
    ScriptNotes podcast with John August and Craig Mazin, including this live episode (Dominic)
    Love from BAM Netflix parties, Lou Doillon’s Instagram feed (Susannah)

    Edited by Morgan Avery. Podcast artwork by Ann Davenport. Leave a voice message telling us your favorite erotic thrillers for the next episode.

    • 54 min
    2: Feeling Good

    2: Feeling Good

    Locked down and looking for comfort, Letterboxd editor Gemma Gracewood, London-based film and music writer Ella Kemp and LA-based musician and writer Demi Adejuyigbe explore why Paddington Bear, Donald O’Connor and Talking Heads are deeply uplifting in these strange times, nominate their favorite actors-doing-things-on-the-internet, and find film-watching solutions to the attention-span issues that come with staying home.

    Links

    Pixar director recommendations for children:


    All Ages
    7 to 12 Years
    12 Years and Over

    The Letterboxd Feel-Good Showdown

    Our interview with Paddington and Paddington 2 writer-director Paul King

    Edgar Wright’s 100 favorite comedies

    Rian Johnson’s favorite 70s movie musicals

    Bright Wall/Dark Room’s crowd-sourced list of most obscure movie recommendations. Our panel’s picks:


    Angel (Ella)
    The Castle (Demi)
    Wham! in China: Foreign Skies (Gemma)

    Patrick Stewart’s Sonnets

    Sam Neill’s therapeutic Twitter and Instagram feeds

    Demi’s food-bank donation drive

    Richard E. Grant on Twitter

    Art House Online—help us support art house cinemas by renting these new, recent and re-released films, and read Ella’s interview with Levan Akin, director of And Then We Danced

    The panel’s feel-good picks for this week:


    Donald O’Connor’s ‘Make ’em Laugh’ dance sequence from Singin’ in the Rain (Gemma)
    Stop Making Sense  (1984), Jonathan Demme’s Talking Heads film (Demi)
    The Shop Around the Corner (1940) (Ella)

    This podcast was recorded in Los Angeles, London and Auckland and edited by Morgan Avery. Our podcast artwork is by Ann Davenport. Leave a voice message telling us your favorite films set in big cities for our next episode, in which our West Coast editor Dominic Corry and New York correspondent Susannah Gruder will remember the recent past through movies.

    • 45 min

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