Epizódy: 686

The Bay is a local news podcast about what’s really going on here. We’ll show you the messy and resilient culture of this place we call home, with help from Bay Area reporters, community leaders, and neighbors. The show is hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra, and new episodes drop every Monday, Wednesday and Friday morning.

The Bay KQED

    • Správy

The Bay is a local news podcast about what’s really going on here. We’ll show you the messy and resilient culture of this place we call home, with help from Bay Area reporters, community leaders, and neighbors. The show is hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra, and new episodes drop every Monday, Wednesday and Friday morning.

    In the Bay, Hundreds Are Coming Out to Support Chinese Protesters

    In the Bay, Hundreds Are Coming Out to Support Chinese Protesters

    Even in the Bay Area, it’s a big risk for Chinese residents to protest against the Chinese Communist Party. Many fear retaliation against themselves and their loved ones in China. 
    But over the past week, hundreds of people have attended candlelight vigils in multiple cities, including San Jose and San Francisco. These protests have been held to support people in China and to remember the 10 people who died in an apartment fire in China’s Xinjiang province. The public outrage from these deaths — which many believe were caused by China’s strict COVID lockdowns — sparked protests across the nation.
    Today, we hear from a Chinese university student in the Bay Area who attended a vigil in San Jose.
    This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo and Maria Esquinca, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra. 
    Your support makes KQED podcasts possible. You can show your love by going to https://kqed.org/donate/podcasts.
    Links:
    Xinjiang Victims Database

    • 20 min
    Got Climate Anxiety? Here’s How to Deal With It

    Got Climate Anxiety? Here’s How to Deal With It

    Leaders from nearly 200 countries recently met during COP27, the 27th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. While some gains were made, like the creation of a “loss and damage” fund to help vulnerable countries, negotiations were stalled by oil-producing nations. The overwhelming scope of Climate Change and the inevitable losses on the planet can lead to feelings of paralysis, discouragement, sadness and stress. In this episode from November of last year, KQED climate reporter Laura Kilvans, urges listeners to sit with their feelings, and offers the possibility of turning to a place of hope.
    Guest: Laura Klivans, KQED climate reporter
    This episode originally aired on Nov. 17, 2021.
    More Resources:

    ‘Climate Change is Here. It’s Bad. Here’s What You Can Do’ 

    Submit a Bay Area climate change question for KQED reporters

    • 16 min
    Oakland Plans to Return 5 Acres to East Bay Ohlone

    Oakland Plans to Return 5 Acres to East Bay Ohlone

    Oakland is on the verge of returning 5 acres of Joaquin Miller Park to the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust and the Confederated Villages of Lisjan. This would be the first time a California city has returned land to Native American tribes.
    Despite no significant opposition to this plan, this process has taken more than 5 years. So what does it actually take to return land back to tribes?
    Guest: Annelise Finney, KQED reporter
    Apply to be an intern with The Bay!
    Your support makes KQED podcasts possible. You can show your love by going to https://kqed.org/donate/podcasts.
    This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo and Ericka Cruz Guevarra, with support from Maria Esquinca. Ericka Cruz Guevarra is the host. 

    • 25 min
    Thousands of UC Academic Workers Are on Strike

    Thousands of UC Academic Workers Are on Strike

    Universities across the country rely on students and academic workers to grade papers, run classes, conduct research, and provide student support. It’s demanding work, often for little pay. 
    But now, the unions representing 48,000 University of California students and academic workers say they’ve had enough, and on Monday thousands of people across the system's 10 campuses went on strike. 
    Guest: Bria Suggs, journalist and graduate student at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism
    Links:

    'Thousands of UC Academic Workers Continue Massive Statewide Strike in Demand for Living Wage,' by Matthew Green, Nov. 16, 2022.


    We're hiring an intern! Please submit your resume by Monday, Nov. 28.


    This episode was produced by Alan Montecillo and Maria Esquinca, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra.
    Your support makes KQED podcasts possible. You can show your love by going to https://kqed.org/donate/podcasts.

    • 18 min
    Twitter's Implosion is Hurting Local Charities

    Twitter's Implosion is Hurting Local Charities

    Elon Musk’s takeover of Twitter has led to complete chaos: layoffs, advertiser panic, and concerns all around the world about what this means for speech on the internet.
    But here in the Bay, what happens at Twitter has ripple effects too. Not only has the company laid off thousands of employees and contractors, but the company’s donations and charitable programs are in disarray, leaving dozens of Bay Area nonprofits stunned, confused and angry.
    Guest: Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez, KQED politics reporter
    Links:

    'Thousands of Dollars in Donations to Veterans, Unhoused People May Be the Latest Victims of Elon Musk's Twitter Takeover,' by Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez, Nov. 12, 2022.


    We're hiring an intern! This position pays $16.99 an hour and is 16 hours a week, lasting from Jan. 9, 2023 to Jul. 1, 2023. Please submit a resume and cover letter by Monday, Nov. 28.


    This episode was produced by Maria Esquinca and Ericka Cruz Guevarra, edited by Alan Montecillo, and hosted by Ericka Cruz Guevarra.
    Your support makes KQED podcasts possible. You can show your love by going to https://kqed.org/donate/podcasts.

    • 16 min
    A Settlement in the Vallejo Police Killing of Angel Ramos

    A Settlement in the Vallejo Police Killing of Angel Ramos

    The city of Vallejo is notorious for being forced to pay out millions in legal settlements to victims of police violence. In the latest example, The Vallejo Sun reports that the city reached a $2.8 million dollar settlement with the family of Angel Ramos, the 21-year-old shot and killed by Vallejo Police during a family gathering in January 2017.
    It’s the latest update in the long, grueling process for families left with the aftermath of a police killing. Today, we’re re-running an episode from our series on Vallejo Police, which first published in August of 2019, detailing how Ramos’ family challenged the police’s narrative of what happened the night Angel was killed.
    Links:

    Our series on Vallejo Police

    The original article: In Vallejo, a Sister Challenges the Police Narrative of Her Brother's Shooting


    Vallejo reaches $2.8M settlement for police killing of Angel Ramos 

    • 31 min

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