398 episodes

An in-depth look at the issues, culture and personalities shaping Canada today.

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    • News

An in-depth look at the issues, culture and personalities shaping Canada today.

    What we think we know about human trafficking in Canada

    What we think we know about human trafficking in Canada

    It's one of those crimes with an image — and that image is mostly fictional. The vast majority of victims who end up trafficked in Canada are not abducted by strangers and chained to beds as Hollywood depicts. They are victims of intimate partner violence, often pushed into the industry by a person they know. And it doesn't happen in dark warehouses, but in well-lit chain hotels, like one's you've stayed at on a business trip.
    Today we'll meet the women fighting to help trafficking victims, learn where and how this crime really happens, and why police charge so few people in these cases. And you'll learn how to recognize a potential trafficking situation when it's right in front of you.
    GUEST: Cristina Howorun, CityNews, lead reporter on VeraCity: Fighting Traffick documentary

    • 29 min
    Enbridge has paid American police millions to protect their pipeline

    Enbridge has paid American police millions to protect their pipeline

    Through a so-called "public safety escrow account", Canada's biggest energy company, Enbridge, has payed somewhere in the neighbourhood of $2.4 million to law enforcement agencies in Minnesota, ostensibly to reimburse police for any help provided in 'protecting' the construction of the new Line 3 oil pipeline through the state. 

    While Enbridge claims that there is nothing untoward about the arrangement, others have been sounding the alarm that this sort of arrangement between public and private entities is unethical, and may serve to incentivize the use of violence against demonstrators. 

    And so it begs the question: what exactly is Enbridge paying for? 


    GUEST: Hilary Beaumont, investigative journalist 

    • 20 min
    The myth of the Mountie, and how it prevents RCMP reform

    The myth of the Mountie, and how it prevents RCMP reform

    To the rest of the world, the Mountie in red dress uniform is a symbol of Canada. The world has bought into the myth of the good-hearted, white man who protects the little guys and always gets his man. Even a cursory look at the history of the RCMP would reveal that to be far from the truth—and in-depth reporting over the past decade has made it very clear just how poorly reality compares to the image.

    But the image endures? Why? How did it come to be so powerful? Why is the RCMP so resistant to reform? And if an ongoing investigation into Canada's largest shooting reveals that their actions made a bad situation deadly, will even that be enough to change things?

    GUEST: Jane Gerster, journalist and author

    • 27 min
    How the global supply chain broke down and what it means for Canada

    How the global supply chain broke down and what it means for Canada

    You've probably heard warnings to start your holiday shopping early this year — this is why. With much of the global supply chain thrown into chaos by a combination of several complicating factors, it's impossible to tell when or if you'll be able to find exactly what you want. But a little shipping inconvenience is hardly the end of the world. What should concern us all about the current situation is what it reveals about the fragility of the systems the world uses to manufacture and move goods with pinpoint efficiency.

    Has our quest for the most efficient system created a system that can't handle it when something goes awry? What are the implications of that?

    GUEST: Michael LeBlanc, retailer, host of The Voice of Retail podcast, Senior Retail Advisor at the Retail Council of Canada

    • 24 min
    Why you can't drink the water in Iqaluit right now

    Why you can't drink the water in Iqaluit right now

    Early in October, some Iqaluit residents noticed something funny about their tap water — it smelled like gas. After they raised the alarm it took more than a week of varied testing to confirm the presence of fuel in the water. Since last week, citizens have been told not to drink the water at all, not even to boil it first. How did this happen and how can it be fixed? Why are health officials dodging questions about how much fuel is in the water? And what does the entire mess reveal about infrastructure in Canada's northernmost regions?

    GUEST: Kent Driscoll, APTN Iqaluit

    • 17 min
    Why has Covid's fourth wave been so different across Canada?

    Why has Covid's fourth wave been so different across Canada?

    Much of the Atlantic bubble is intact, but in New Brunswick, cases are spiking. Ontario has mostly escaped unscathed so far, while Saskatchewan and Alberta grapple with a wave worse than the first three. Is this evidence of the pandemic diverging regionally across Canada, or just a more infectious variant that can better find holes that existed the entire time?

    What have we learned from previous waves that we're employing now? What are we still finding out? And, most importantly, will this be Covid's last wave in Canada?

    GUEST: Dr. Raywat Deonandan, Global Health Epidemiologist and Associate Professor with the Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences at the University of Ottawa.

    • 22 min

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