22 episodes

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Contains all versions of all episodes from Devchat.tv

    RNR 144: At RxJS Live with Hannah Howard

    RNR 144: At RxJS Live with Hannah Howard

    In this episode of React Native Radio Charles Max Wood interviews Hannah Howard at RxJS Live about her talk. Hannah is really enthusiastic about RxJS especially when it comes to frontend development. Her talk is about how to architect full-scale apps with RxJS. Hannah gives a brief summary of her talk. Charles having met Hanna previously at Code Beam asks her how functional programming and reactive programming work together in her mind. Hannah describes how she sees programming. 


    Panelists



    Charles Max Wood




    Guest:



    Hannah Howard




    Sponsors



    Infinite Red



    G2i



    CacheFly




    Links



    https://www.rxjs.live/



    RxJS Live Youtube Channel



    https://twitter.com/techgirlwonder



    https://www.facebook.com/ReactNativeRadio/



    https://twitter.com/R_N_Radio

    • 8 min
    VoV 090: Variable Fonts with Mandy Michael

    VoV 090: Variable Fonts with Mandy Michael

    In this episode of Views on Vue Charles Max Wood joins Mandy Michael at JAMstack Conf SF, where she gives a talk about responsive typography and variable fonts. Mandy explains what variable fonts are and how they can be used to shrink, stretch and do some very fun and creative thing with them. They discuss how to use them and Mandy explains some of the demos from her talk. 


     


    Charles asks Mandy what some of the things were that she had to cut from her talk. She had to cut a few longer demos, details and performance improvements that can be made with responsive typography. Mandy shares what she is working on now with responsive typography and explains how much fun she has had expressing herself through variable fonts. To see more of Mandy’s demos and to learn more about responsive typography and variable fonts see the links below. 


    Panelists



    Charles Wood




    Guest:



    Mandy Michael




    Sponsors



    Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan



    CacheFly




    Links



    https://jamstackconf.com/sf/



    https://variablefonts.dev/



    https://codepen.io/collection/XqRLMb/



    https://twitter.com/Mandy_Kerr?



    https://www.facebook.com/ViewsonVue



    https://twitter.com/viewsonvue

    • 20 min
    RR 440: Swagger and OpenAPI with Josh Ponelat

    RR 440: Swagger and OpenAPI with Josh Ponelat

    Today the panel discusses the difference between Swagger and Open API with Josh Ponelat. Josh details the difference between the two. Swagger is a set of protocols around describing restful APIs. Swagger was taken over by a company called SmartBear, who donated the donated the specification to the Open Linux Foundation, and that became the Open API. Swagger is the tooling surrounding these specifications. Open API is a standardized way to describe a restful API in a YAML file. Once you’ve got a YAML file to describe your API, you can use tooling like Swagger to leverage that and take it to the next level. Using the Open API process is useful for situations where you already have an API in place, but want to codify and document it so that it’s controlled. Then going forward, you won’t introduce contradictions and it remains consistent because it’s documented in a YAML file. The process leaves room for enhancement in the future as well.


    Josh talks about some of the benefits of standardizing your API and some of the use cases besides tooling. A standardized API can help show developers how to use your API, SDKs, and service stubs by knowing your API is consistent in style. This makes it easier to find breaking changes and more. Josh talks more about Swagger, a finite set of tooling around Open API, most of which are open source. He talks about other tools that test APIs and do linting on YAML files. Some of the companies that use Open API include Google, Amazon, and Microsoft. Josh talks about how Amazon implements Open API.


    Josh talks about the book he’s writing, Designing APIs with Swagger and Open API. The book goes over describing APIs today, how to design APIs without writing code first, and how to get the most out of the system. The show concludes with Josh talking about the power of consistency and writing things down on paper. He discusses where implications that the standardization of APIs has on the text industry.


    Panelists



    Dan Shappir



    Charles Max Wood




    Guest



    Joshua S. Ponelat




    Sponsors



    Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit



    Cloud 66 - Pain Free Rails Deployments Try Cloud 66 Rails for FREE & get $100 of free credits with promo code RubyRogues-19



    RedisGreen


    _____________________________________________________________




    "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!



    ____________________________________________________________

    Links



    Josh's Twitter



    Swagger



    Open API



    Difference Between Swagger and Open API



    GraphQL



    Designing APIs with Swagger and Open API




    Picks

    Dan Shappir




    Saga of Pliocene Exile




    Charles Max Wood




    DevChat.tv Merchandise 



    BusyCal




    Josh Ponelat




    AsciiDoc



    FASD tool

    • 46 min
    RRU 090: How Do I Introduce New Tech at Work?

    RRU 090: How Do I Introduce New Tech at Work?

    Today the panel is discussing how to introduce new tech at work. They agree that it’s important to get input from all teams on the decision, although it will primarily affect the development team. One should also consider the different ways people make decisions, such as through discussion or quiet thinking, and give everyone time to come to a decision. The panel talks about positive and negative examples of how to introduce new tech at work. Thomas believes that it is important to acknowledge your own biases in decision making and to try to avoid them. The React experts discuss the significance of the team dynamic and the necessity of different roles in decision making or if it is better to have an organic discovery phase. This relates to Thomas’ point about personal biases, and he believes that it is important to put people in roles that are opposite of their personality. When making decisions about new technology, it is also important to note that not all decisions require the same amount of input, and they discuss how to measure how much input is required for a decision.


    The discussion turns to methods for introducing testing, and the panelists talk about their experiences. The rule of thumb for introducing testing is to start simple, have an expected behavior, and test the output to see if it matches. Some other aspects of this discussion to consider are that introducing React Hooks could be considered introducing tech, testing is just a new process, introducing new tools, and budget concerns. Charles shares experience convincing his boss to introduce Agile practices which shows the importance of getting management to see the benefits of the new tech or strategy for themselves. The show concludes with the panel acknowledging that other than introducing tech, introducing philosophies on how to organize your code follows the same patterns as introducing technology.


    Panelists



    Thomas Aylott



    Charles Max Wood



    Chris Reyes




    Sponsors



    NxPlaybook.com - Use code ‘NXDEVCHAT’ for 50% off the official https://nx.dev/React Advanced Workspaces course! 



    Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit




    Links



    Vue



    12 React Best Practices You Need to Follow in 2019



    Saul



    Test && commit || revert



    VS Code ESLint




    Picks

    Thomas Aylott




    Teachable Machine




    Charles Max Wood




    White Christmas



    Holiday Inn




    Chris Reyes




    Practical React Hooks

    • 38 min
    MAS 100: My Angular Story Episode 100!

    MAS 100: My Angular Story Episode 100!

    My Angular Story is celebrating its 100th episode today with hosts Aaron Frost and Charles Max Wood. Charles and Aaron tell their stories of how they got into Angular. They compare React and AngularJS.


    They also talk about the evolution of My Angular Story and how the show helped Charles learn more Angular. My Angular Story paved the way for more other Angular podcasts such as Angular Air.


    Charles and Aaron invite community to tweet to them if they are more agnostic or if they are more framework specific. They also talk about Charles' new book "The MaxCoders Guide To Finding Your Dream Developer Job" that was published on Amazon and became a #1 New Release in several Career and Job Hunting lists. In the book Charles gives a step by step guide on how to find a job as a developer that you will love. One of the tips Charles gives is to specialize, whatever you want to be working on be the expert or the "go to guy" in that area. So if you are working in Angular learn everything there is to know about Angular.


    Host: Aaron Frost

    Joined By Special Guest : Charles Max Wood

    My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs

    Sponsors



    Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit



    Adventures in DevOps Podcast



    Cachefly




    ____________________________________________________________


    "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!



    ____________________________________________________________

     

    Links



    Charles Max Wood Twitter



    Aaron Frost Twitter




    Picks

    Charles Max Wood:




    The MaxCoders Guide To Finding Your Dream Developer Job by Charles Max Wood



    The Bishop's Wife- Christmas Movie



    Holiday Inn - Christmas Movie




    Aaron Frost:




    Angular 9



    People Who Like Musicals - Next year's ng-conf will have a musical theme



    Chloe Condon

    • 41 min
    JSJ 410: Iterating on Open Source

    JSJ 410: Iterating on Open Source

    Today the panel is discussing iterating on open source projects. Aimee and AJ recall a conversation they had in the past on this subject and AJ talks about some of his experience iterating with open source. AJ believes that we have an obligation to capture the value of what you create so that we can reinvest and create more value, though he admits that making money in open source is a unique challenge because donations only really work if you have a project that gets billions of downloads a month. As your project grows, it has to change in order to survive, and eventually you will need to get financial support from your project. The panel agrees that some of the main issues with iterating in open source are maintaining the code and getting feedback from users, financial backing, and roadmapping and integrations.


    The panel discusses their methods for getting feedback from their users. This feedback is valuable because it can show you things that you missed. They acknowledge that there can be conflicts of interest between those who only use the project and those who financially support it, and you have to make a choice. Unfortunately, someone is probably going to be inconvenienced no matter what choice you make. When making these decisions, you have to consider who it helps, who it frustrates, and who it may cause problems for. The panelists talk about different ways they’ve handled making these decisions in the past. The JavaScript experts talk about the importance of having data on your user base in order to make good choices for your users. They talk about different methods for notifying your users of upcoming changes and how it will affect compatibility, and some of the challenges with communicating with your users. AJ talks about an iteration he thought was a good idea but that a lot of people hated and how he noticed that the new users liked it but the old users did not. They panel agrees that people in general don’t like change. AJ talks about what he learned from this experience. 


    Another common issue is integrating with other services. Integrating with cloud services, or at least giving people the option to integrate gives you an opportunity to reach more people and maintain the project long term. AJ gives some final thoughts to close the show, namely that most projects never go anywhere, and that’s ok. If you’ve got something that starts going somewhere, think early on about how you can better serve the community and remember that these people are mostly grateful and semi-willing to support you. He believes that if you are helping people create value, you deserve to see the fruits of your labor. He advises listeners to stay true to your open source ideals, think about your users perspective, and that the earlier you can think about this and make these choices, the better it is for your project




     


    Panelists



    Aimee Knight



    Steve Edwards



    AJ O’Neal



    Charles Max Wood




    **To receive your 40% OFF coupon for Manning Publications (good for all our products in all formats) visit us on Facebook - click on "Send A Message"and type "YES"**

    Sponsors



    Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit




    Links



    How-npm-am-i



    React



    Vue.js



    Let’s Encrypt



    Async/await



    Node




    Picks

    Aimee Knight:




    Debug Like a Ninja




    Steve Edwards:




    Jack Ryan 




    AJ O’Neal:




    Why I, as a black man, attend KKK meetings




    Charles Max Wood:




    It’s a Wonderful Life



    Mr. Kreuger’s Christmas

    • 59 min

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