105 episodes

A history of the lands between India, China and Australia.

History of Southeast Asia Charles Kimball

    • History
    • 4.8 • 6 Ratings

A history of the lands between India, China and Australia.

    Episode 101: Burma, A Ne Win Situation

    Episode 101: Burma, A Ne Win Situation

    With this episode, the second hundred episodes of the podcast will begin! Today we look at Burma from the 1950s to 1988, going up to the point just before the country was renamed Myanmar. During this period, the country had only two leaders, U Nu and Ne Win. U Nu tried unsuccessfully to turn Burma into a socialist state, while Ne Win was a dictator who did some wild things because he was also superstitious.

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    Episode 100: The Philippines, A Dictatorship Made For Two

    Episode 100: The Philippines, A Dictatorship Made For Two

    Turn your clock back an hour (if you are in a place that does that), and tune in to the podcast! After four years and four months, here is the podcast's 100th episode! Today we go to the Philippines, to look at those islands from 1957 to 1981, a period that includes the first part of the Marcos dictatorship. And then listen in to hear how I will celebrate, because completing 100 episodes is a big deal for any podcast.

    (http://xenohistorian.faithweb.com/seasia/Imelda_Ferdinand.jpg)

    Imelda and Ferdinand Marcos.

    (http://xenohistorian.faithweb.com/seasia/FM_martial_law.jpg)

    And here is a 1972 newspaper, announcing the declaration of martial law.

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    Episode 99: Thailand Experiments With Revolution

    Episode 99: Thailand Experiments With Revolution

    This episode looks at Thailand from 1957 to 1976. Here attempts are made to replace the military dictatorship with a true Western-style democracy, but the civilian government is too unstable to last, showing that the Thais still have much to learn.

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    And here is the Podcast Hall of Fame page (http://xenohistorian.faithweb.com/seasia/donors.html), to honor those who have donated already!

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    Episode 98: Malaysia and Singapore Get Organized

    Episode 98: Malaysia and Singapore Get Organized

    For this episode, the narrative goes to Malaya, which was last covered in Episode 69, and to Singapore and the British-ruled areas on the north side of Borneo. We will hear how Singapore became independent, and how Malaya became Malaysia. (http://xenohistorian.faithweb.com/seasia/Malaysia-on-map.png) Here is a simple map of Malaysia showing all the places talked about in this episode, including Singapore and Brunei. Do you think you would like to become a podcaster on Blubrry? Click here for the details on joining. (http://create.blubrry.com/resources/podcast-media-hosting/?code=HSEASIA) Enter my promo code, HSEASIA, to let them know I sent you, and you will get the first month's hosting for free!
    Support this podcast!
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    And here is the Podcast Hall of Fame page (http://xenohistorian.faithweb.com/seasia/donors.html), to honor those who have donated already! Visit the Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/HistoryofSoutheastAsia) to become a long-term supporter of the podcast!

    Episode 97: Indonesia Under Sukarno

    Episode 97: Indonesia Under Sukarno

    Today's episode begins a series of episodes on the recent history of Southeast Asia. We will start by looking at Indonesia from 1950 to 1967, when Sukarno was the country's first president.

    (http://xenohistorian.faithweb.com/seasia/KennedySukarno.jpg)

    In 1961, Indonesia's President Sukarno visited Washington, D.C., to meet with John F. Kennedy. Both presidents were notorious womanizers, but while Sukarno was proud of it, in Kennedy's case the girl-chasing was kept secret until several years after his death.

    (http://xenohistorian.faithweb.com/seasia/non-blok.jpg)

    Under Sukarno, Indonesia helped get the Nonaligned Movement started, by hosting a conference of leaders from 29 neutral Asian and African countries, at Bandung on Java in 1955. Today we usually call the countries in the Nonaligned Movement the "Third World." This photo shows five leaders of the Nonaligned Movement. From left to right: India's Jawaharlal Nehru, Ghana's Kwame Nkrumah, Egypt's Gamal Abdel Nasser, Indonesia's Sukarno, Yugoslavia's Josip Broz Tito.

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    And here is the Podcast Hall of Fame page (http://xenohistorian.faithweb.com/seasia/donors.html), to honor those who have donated already!

    Visit the Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/HistoryofSoutheastAsia) to become a long-term supporter of the podcast!

    Episode 96: The Second Indochina War, Part 23

    Episode 96: The Second Indochina War, Part 23

    This episode is the longest for the podcast yet, because it wraps up the narrative that has continued since Episode 71. Yes, today you will hear how the Second Indochina War ended, in Cambodia, Vietnam, and Laos! So this is also the last episode of what I called "the Unofficial Vietnam War Podcast." For those of you who were listening when the podcast started covering the Vietnam War, thank you for sticking with it to the end.

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    And here is the Podcast Hall of Fame page (http://xenohistorian.faithweb.com/seasia/donors.html), to honor those who have donated already!

    Visit the Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/HistoryofSoutheastAsia) to become a long-term supporter of the podcast!

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

NikNattawat ,

Kob khun kub

Hi Charles, thanks a lot for this podcast. As a south east asian myself. I appreciate your works those give me what is somehow missing from our school education.

Bloom Tom ,

Good so far

Listened to first 10 episodes. Good so far. Looking forward to reaching more modern times. Kimball's dry humor hits home, strangely enough. Lot of names pronounced poorly. If possible a bit more research into correct pronunciations would be good Charles.

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