14 episodes

The astrophysics program at the University of Chicago began with the building of the Yerkes Observatory, in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, where the entire Department was located. By the mid-sixties it had become clear that ties to the intellectual community on campus needed to be strengthened, and there was a shift of the center of mass from Wisconsin to Chicago. All of the academic programs are now on campus. Yerkes still provides laboratory facilities, contains the bulk of the library astronomy holdings outside of Crerar, and offers access to research telescopes and instruments for prototyping and instruction.

Astronomy & Astrophysics The University of Chicago

    • Science

The astrophysics program at the University of Chicago began with the building of the Yerkes Observatory, in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, where the entire Department was located. By the mid-sixties it had become clear that ties to the intellectual community on campus needed to be strengthened, and there was a shift of the center of mass from Wisconsin to Chicago. All of the academic programs are now on campus. Yerkes still provides laboratory facilities, contains the bulk of the library astronomy holdings outside of Crerar, and offers access to research telescopes and instruments for prototyping and instruction.

    • video
    Giant Magellan Telescope enters construction phase

    Giant Magellan Telescope enters construction phase

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    The 11 international partners of the Giant Magellan Telescope Organization, which includes the University of Chicago, announces the commitment of more than $500 million to begin construction of the first of a new generation of extremely large telescopes. This animated video shows the operation of the Giant Magellan Telescope. Announcing the project’s construction phase and commenting on its capabilities are Wendy Freedman, chair of the GMTO Board of Directors; Matthew Colless, vice chair of the GMTO Board; and Edward Moses, GMTO president. (Credit: Giant Magellan Telescope—GMTO Corporation)

    • 1 min
    • video
    The Nora and Edward Ryerson Lecture: Quarks and the Cosmos

    The Nora and Edward Ryerson Lecture: Quarks and the Cosmos

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Pioneering University of Chicago cosmologist Michael S. Turner focuses his remarks on “the Chicago School of Cosmology,” from Edwin Hubble and George Ellery Hale to the present. Hubble, SB 1910, PhD 1917, discovered that the universe consists of billions of galaxies and that it has been expanding since it began in a big bang. Hale was the first chairman of the University’s Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics. He also founded Yerkes Observatory, which under his leadership developed the big reflecting telescopes that are the workhorses of optical astronomy today, making discoveries from the expanding universe to planets orbiting other stars.Turning to more recent times, Turner discusses efforts that started in the 1980s at UChicago to establish the new field of particle astrophysics and cosmology. At that time, the Chicago School, consisting primarily of the late David Schramm, Edward "Rocky" Kolb, the Arthur Holly Compton Distinguished Service Professor in Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Turner, was alone in pushing this idea. “Today this idea that there are deep connections between the very big and the very small is universally accepted, has propelled the field to its current prominence, and underpins our understanding of the universe,” Turner said. “As we say at Chicago, ideas matter!”The Ryerson Lecture grew out of a 1972 bequest to the University by Nora and Edward L. Ryerson, a former chairman of the board of trustees. The lecture honors excellence in academic pursuits. A faculty committee selects the Ryerson Lecturer based on research contributions of lasting significance.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    The Nora and Edward Ryerson Lecture: Quarks and the Cosmos (audio)

    The Nora and Edward Ryerson Lecture: Quarks and the Cosmos (audio)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Pioneering University of Chicago cosmologist Michael S. Turner focuses his remarks on “the Chicago School of Cosmology,” from Edwin Hubble and George Ellery Hale to the present. Hubble, SB 1910, PhD 1917, discovered that the universe consists of billions of galaxies and that it has been expanding since it began in a big bang. Hale was the first chairman of the University’s Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics. He also founded Yerkes Observatory, which under his leadership developed the big reflecting telescopes that are the workhorses of optical astronomy today, making discoveries from the expanding universe to planets orbiting other stars.Turning to more recent times, Turner discusses efforts that started in the 1980s at UChicago to establish the new field of particle astrophysics and cosmology. At that time, the Chicago School, consisting primarily of the late David Schramm, Edward "Rocky" Kolb, the Arthur Holly Compton Distinguished Service Professor in Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Turner, was alone in pushing this idea. “Today this idea that there are deep connections between the very big and the very small is universally accepted, has propelled the field to its current prominence, and underpins our understanding of the universe,” Turner said. “As we say at Chicago, ideas matter!”The Ryerson Lecture grew out of a 1972 bequest to the University by Nora and Edward L. Ryerson, a former chairman of the board of trustees. The lecture honors excellence in academic pursuits. A faculty committee selects the Ryerson Lecturer based on research contributions of lasting significance.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    • video
    The Hunt for Earth-like Planets

    The Hunt for Earth-like Planets

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    UChicago Assistant Professor Daniel Fabrycky explains how his work with the Kepler space telescope is helping to find far-off planets like our own.

    • 3 min
    The Hunt for Earth-like Planets (audio)

    The Hunt for Earth-like Planets (audio)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    UChicago Assistant Professor Daniel Fabrycky explains how his work with the Kepler space telescope is helping to find far-off planets like our own.

    • 3 min
    • video
    Cosmos and Culture

    Cosmos and Culture

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Scholars and researches discuss the interplay between society and science at the Adler Planetarium's high-tech Grainger Sky Theater. The discussion focused on the mysteries of the cosmos and how they have affected our art, entertainment, and education, and the disconnect between society and true scientific knowledge.

    • 1 hr 28 min

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