64 episodes

Foot & Ankle International (FAI), in publication since 1980, is the official journal of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS). This monthly medical journal emphasizes surgical and medical management as it relates to the foot and ankle with a specific focus on reconstructive, trauma, and sports-related conditions utilizing the latest technological advances.

Foot and Ankle Orthopaedics SAGE Publications

    • Science

Foot & Ankle International (FAI), in publication since 1980, is the official journal of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS). This monthly medical journal emphasizes surgical and medical management as it relates to the foot and ankle with a specific focus on reconstructive, trauma, and sports-related conditions utilizing the latest technological advances.

    FAI December 2020: Effect of Metformin on Development of Tendinopathy Due to Mechanical Overloading in an Animal Model

    FAI December 2020: Effect of Metformin on Development of Tendinopathy Due to Mechanical Overloading in an Animal Model

    Tendinopathy is a debilitating tendon disorder that affects millions of Americans and costs billions of health care dollars every year. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a known tissue damage signaling molecule, has been identified as a mediator in the development of tendinopathy due to mechanical overloading of tendons in mice. Metformin (Met), a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, specifically inhibits HMGB1. This study tested the hypothesis that Met would prevent mechanical overloading-induced tendinopathy in a mouse model of tendinopathy created by intensive treadmill running (ITR).
    In conclusion, inhibition of HMGB1 by injections of Met prevented tendinopathy development due to mechanical overloading in the Achilles tendon in mice.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 14 min
    FAI November 2020: Rate of Delayed Union With Early Weightbearing Following Intramedullary Screw Fixation of Jones Fractures

    FAI November 2020: Rate of Delayed Union With Early Weightbearing Following Intramedullary Screw Fixation of Jones Fractures

    Jones fractures of the proximal fifth metatarsal are predisposed to delayed union and nonunion due to a tenuous blood supply. Solid intramedullary (IM) screw fixation is recommended to improve healing, traditionally followed by delayed weightbearing (DWB). However, early weightbearing (EWB) postoperatively may facilitate functional recovery. The purpose of this study was to compare union rates and time to union after solid IM screw fixation of Jones fractures in patients treated with an EWB protocol to those treated with a DWB protocol, as well as to identify any factors that may be predictive of delayed or nonunion.
    In conclusion, postoperative protocols using early weightbearing following solid IM screw fixation of Jones fractures appear to be safe and do not delay fracture healing or increase the risk of delayed union. Older age may be a risk for delayed union, but larger studies are needed to evaluate this with appropriate power in light of possible confounders. EWB protocols may allow better functional recovery without compromising outcomes by increasing the risk of delayed union.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 13 min
    FAI October 2020: Comparison of Patients’ and Surgeons’ Expectations in Foot and Ankle Surgery

    FAI October 2020: Comparison of Patients’ and Surgeons’ Expectations in Foot and Ankle Surgery

    Aligning patient and surgeon expectations may improve patient satisfaction and outcomes. This study aimed to assess differences in expectations of foot and ankle surgery between patients and their surgeons.
    In conclusion, more than two-thirds of patients had significantly higher expectations than their surgeons. Higher BMI was associated with higher patient than surgeon expectations. These results emphasize the importance for foot and ankle surgeons to adequately educate patients preoperatively.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 12 min
    FAI September 2020: Comparison Between Polyvinyl Alcohol Implant and Cheilectomy With Moberg Osteotomy for Hallux Rigidus

    FAI September 2020: Comparison Between Polyvinyl Alcohol Implant and Cheilectomy With Moberg Osteotomy for Hallux Rigidus

    In 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel implant for the surgical management of hallux rigidus. Though recent studies have evaluated the safety and efficacy of the implant, no study has compared outcomes following PVA implantation with those following traditional joint-preserving procedures for hallux rigidus, such as cheilectomy with Moberg osteotomy. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and patient-reported outcomes for patients undergoing cheilectomy and Moberg osteotomy, with or without PVA implant, at a single multisurgeon academic center.
    In conclusion, though our results generally support the safety and utility of the PVA implant as previously established by the clinical trial, at 1 to 2 years of follow-up, CM without a PVA implant may provide equivalent or better relief compared with a PVACM procedure, while avoiding potential risks associated with the implant.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 14 min
    FAI August 2020: Patient Characteristics of Possible Responders and Nonresponders to Total Ankle Arthroplasty

    FAI August 2020: Patient Characteristics of Possible Responders and Nonresponders to Total Ankle Arthroplasty

    Characteristics of responders, or those who achieve a clinical improvement above the level of a minimal clinically important difference, have not been defined for total ankle arthroplasty (TAA). The purpose of this study was to determine patient characteristics that distinguish possible responders from possible nonresponders after TAA using criteria established for other arthroplasty surgeries.
    In conclusion, our data reveal that a higher baseline SF-36 MCS score was associated with increased improvement in SMFA function scores, while rheumatic disease was associated with worse improvement in SMFA function scores after TAA. Patients with rheumatic disease or poor mental health may not achieve as favorable results after TAA and should be counseled appropriately.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 10 min
    FAI July 2020: Comparison of 5-Year Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROMs) of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) to Total Knee Replacement (TKR) and Total Hip Replacement (THR)

    FAI July 2020: Comparison of 5-Year Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROMs) of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) to Total Knee Replacement (TKR) and Total Hip Replacement (THR)

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is becoming a more common alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the improvement of pain and function in end-stage arthritis of the ankle. The effects of end-stage arthritis of the ankle are similar to those of end-stage hip arthritis. There is a paucity of literature on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) following TARs in comparison with total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR). We aimed to study the 1-, 3-, and 5-year outcomes of TAR in comparison with TKR and THR.
    TAR patients had similar outcomes to THR and TKR patients for disease-specific and mental health domains, and lower patient satisfaction rates in terms of pain relief, ADL, and recreation. Further research is warranted including clinical outcomes along with PROMs with a long-term follow-up.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 10 min

Top Podcasts In Science

Listeners Also Subscribed To