187 episodes

Expert insight on health, performance, longevity, critical thinking, and pursuing excellence. Dr. Peter Attia (Stanford/Hopkins/NIH-trained MD) talks with leaders in their fields.

The Peter Attia Driv‪e‬ Peter Attia, MD

    • Medicine
    • 5.0 • 6 Ratings

Expert insight on health, performance, longevity, critical thinking, and pursuing excellence. Dr. Peter Attia (Stanford/Hopkins/NIH-trained MD) talks with leaders in their fields.

    Alex Hutchinson, Ph.D.: Translating the science of endurance and extreme human performance

    Alex Hutchinson, Ph.D.: Translating the science of endurance and extreme human performance

    Alex Hutchinson is a sports science journalist, author of the book Endure—which explores the science of endurance and the real limits of human performance—and former competitive runner for the Canadian national team. In this episode, Alex tells the story of his “aha moment” during a meaningless track meet that catapulted his running career and seeded his interest in the power of the mind. He then explains the science behind VO2 max, the difference between maximum aerobic capacity and efficiency, and extracts insights from examples of extreme human performance, such as the recent attempts to break the 2-hour mark in the marathon. Finally, he brings it back to what this all means for the everyday person: optimal exercise volume for maintaining health, how to avoid acute and chronic injuries, how to diversify your exercise portfolio, HIIT protocols, and much more.

     

    We discuss:
    Alex’s background and passion for running (3:00); The power of the mind: Alex’s “aha moment” that catapulted his running career (9:00); Pursuing a Ph.D. in physics while prioritizing his running career, and doing the hardest thing possible (19:00); Career transition to journalism, tips for improving your writing, and insights from the best writers (26:00); Breaking down VO2 max: Definition, history, why it plateaus, and whether it really matters (38:15); The case study of Oskar Svensson: Why a higher VO2 Max isn’t always better, and the difference between maximum aerobic capacity and efficiency (49:15); The sub 2-hour marathon: The amazing feat by Kipchoge, and what will it take to “officially” run a 2-hour marathon (1:01:00); Comparing the greatest mile runners from the 1950s to today (1:14:45); How the brain influences the limits of endurance (1:20:15); Relationship between exercise volume and health: Minimum dose, optimal dose, and whether too much exercise can shorten lifespan (1:23:45); Age-associated decline in aerobic capacity and muscle mass, and the quick decline with extreme inactivity (1:40:45); Strength or muscle mass—which is more important? (1:47:00); Avoiding acute and chronic injuries from exercise (1:48:45); High intensity interval training: Evolution of the Tabata protocol, pros and cons of HIIT training, and how it fits into a healthy exercise program (1:54:15); The importance of understanding why you are engaging in exercise (2:03:00); How we can encourage better science journalism and reduce the number of sensationalized headlines (2:05:45); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/

    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/AlexHutchinson 

    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/

    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/

    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 2 hrs 13 min
    Senator Bill Frist, M.D.: A modern Renaissance man's journey through science, politics, and business

    Senator Bill Frist, M.D.: A modern Renaissance man's journey through science, politics, and business

    Bill Frist is a nationally acclaimed heart and lung transplant surgeon, former U.S. Senate Majority Leader, and is actively engaged in health policy and education reform. In this episode, Bill takes us through his long and varied career in medicine, politics, and business, which includes establishing the organ transplantation program at Vanderbilt as well as rising from the lowest-ranked member of the U.S. Senate to the Majority Leader in two terms. We discuss some of the most significant moments of his time in the Senate, such as advocating for AIDS prevention programs' funding and addressing complicated issues like stem cell research and the end-of-life issues raised by the Terri Schiavo case. We also hear his first-person account of what happened behind the scenes on September 11, 2001, his frustration with our lack of preparation for the pandemic, and his thoughts about the current state of U.S. politics. Finally, we talk about his current endeavors in health policy and education reform.

    We discuss:
    Bill’s decision to pursue medicine and do organ transplants (3:40); The miraculous nature of organ transplants: History, Bill’s work, and the most exciting things to come (12:00); Frist’s experience building up the heart transplant program at Vanderbilt (21:45); The famous rivalry between surgeons Denton Cooley and Michael DeBakey (29:15); How the medical field can attract bright young people to pursue medicine (33:00); Bill’s decision to leave medicine and run for the US senate (38:00); The value in having scientists and physicians in Congress (47:30); A discussion on whether or not senators should have term limits (55:30); The highly polarized nature of politics, and how we can fix it with empathy (1:00:30); Bill’s time in the Senate and quick rise to Senate Majority Leader (1:05:30); The lifesaving impact of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) under George W. Bush (1:15:15); How Bill reversed course on his view of the value and morality of stem cell research (1:19:45); Complex end-of-life decisions, and Bill’s role in the infamous Terri Schiavo case—a story that captures the conflict among law, morality, and improving technology (1:30:00); Remembering the events of September 11th from Bill’s perspective in the Senate (1:49:45); The coronavirus pandemic: Bill’s accurate 2005 prediction, and a discussion about future preparedness (1:56:45); The divided state of US politics, and how we can come together (2:06:45); How experience in medicine and politics is shaping Bill’s current endeavors in business, reforming education, palliative care, and more (2:12:45); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/
     
    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/BillFrist 
     
    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/
     
    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/
     
    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 2 hrs 23 min
    AMA #20: Simplifying the complexities of insulin resistance: how it's measured, how it manifests in the muscle and liver, and what we can do about it

    AMA #20: Simplifying the complexities of insulin resistance: how it's measured, how it manifests in the muscle and liver, and what we can do about it

    In this “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) episode, Peter and Bob discuss all things related to insulin resistance by revisiting the important points made in the fascinating, yet quite technical, episode of The Drive with Gerald Shulman. They devote the entire discussion to understanding the condition known as insulin resistance, how it’s measured, how it manifests in the muscle and liver, and ultimately, what we can do about it.
    If you’re not a subscriber and listening on a podcast player, you’ll only be able to hear a preview of the AMA. If you’re a subscriber, you can now listen to this full episode on your private RSS feed or on our website at the AMA #20 show notes page. If you are not a subscriber, you can learn more about the subscriber benefits here.

    We discuss:
    Explaining the format of this AMA: Extracting insights from Gerald Shulman’s masterclass on insulin resistance (2:00); The basics of insulin, defining insulin resistance (IR), and gold-standard methods of quantifying IR in the muscle (7:15); Practical ways to test for insulin resistance in a normal clinical setting (15:45); How insulin resistance manifests in the muscle (23:00); The biochemical block in glycogen synthesis—drivers and mechanisms resulting in insulin resistance in the muscle (30:45); The disparity in fat oxidation between insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant individuals (44:45); The fate of the ingested carbohydrate in someone who is insulin resistant (51:00); The prevalence and clinical phenotype of insulin resistance (1:00:15); The role of exercise in mitigating and reversing insulin resistance (1:05:00); How insulin resistance manifests in the liver (1:09:15); Biggest takeaways: what we can do to mitigate and prevent insulin resistance (1:20:45); and More.
    Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/

    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/ama20/ 

    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/

    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/

    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 23 min
    Richard Miller, M.D., Ph.D.: The gold standard for testing longevity drugs: the Interventions Testing Program

    Richard Miller, M.D., Ph.D.: The gold standard for testing longevity drugs: the Interventions Testing Program

    Richard Miller is a professor of pathology and the Director of the Center for Aging Research at the University of Michigan. He is one of the architects of the NIA-funded Interventions Testing Programs (ITPs) animal study test protocol. In this episode, Rich goes through the results of the long list of molecules tested by the ITP—including rapamycin, metformin, nicotinamide riboside, an SGLT-2 inhibitor called canagliflozin, and more. Many of the discussed outcomes have had surprising outcomes—both positive and negative findings.

    We discuss:

    Rich’s interest in aging, and how Hayflick’s hypothesis skewed aging research (3:45); Dispelling the myth that aging can’t be slowed (15:00); The Interventions Testing Program—A scientific framework for testing whether drugs extend lifespan in mice (29:00); Testing aspirin in the first ITP cohort (38:45); Rapamycin: results from ITP studies, dosing considerations, and what it tells us about early- vs. late-life interventions (44:45); Acarbose as a potential longevity agent by virtue of its ability to block peak glucose levels (1:07:15); Resveratrol: why it received so much attention as a longevity agent, and the takeaways from the negative results of the ITP study (1:15:45); The value in negative findings: ITP studies of green tea extract, methylene blue, curcumin, and more (1:24:15); 17α-Estradiol: lifespan effects in male mice, and sex-specific effects of different interventions (1:27:00); Testing ursolic acid and hydrogen sulfide: rationale and preliminary results (1:33:15); Canagliflozin (an SGLT2 inhibitor): exploring the impressive lifespan results in male mice (1:35:45); The failure of metformin: reconciling negative results of the ITP with data in human studies (1:42:30); Nicotinamide riboside: insights from the negative results of the ITP study (1:48:45); The three most important takeaways from the ITP studies (1:55:30); Philosophies on studying the aging process: best model organisms, when to start interventions, which questions to ask, and more (1:59:30); Seven reasons why pigs can't fly (2:08:00); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/
     
    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/RichardMiller 
     
    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/
     
    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/
     
    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 2 hrs 14 min
    Hussein Yassine, M.D.: Deep dive into the “Alzheimer’s gene” (APOE), brain health, and omega-3s

    Hussein Yassine, M.D.: Deep dive into the “Alzheimer’s gene” (APOE), brain health, and omega-3s

    Hussein Yassine is a physician and researcher who studies brain lipid utilization in the context of finding preventative measures for cognitive impairment, specifically Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In my conversation with Hussein, we begin with a fundamental coursework in brain biology—including its architecture and energy systems. We go on to discuss what these systems look like when something goes wrong and cognitive decline ensues. We talk about the evolutionary origins of the ApoE genotype, with specific attention to the ApoE4 allele and its association with AD. We spend time discussing ApoE4 implications for the brain’s fuel utilization, notably omega-3 fatty acids: EPA and DHA. We briefly pivot to the implications of recent omega-3 trials for cardiovascular disease and return to what we currently understand about EPA/DHA and brain health; we contemplate potential dietary interventions across the lifespan to preserve and prolong cognitive function.
    We discuss:

    Hussein’s Background and introduction to brain composition (3:00); The blood-brain barrier and brain filtration (8:00); Lipids and brain function (13:00); How the brain utilizes energy (18:00); Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) structure and function in the periphery (27:30); ApoE function in the brain (38:15); Evolutionary origins of ApoE isoforms (43:45); ApoE4 variant and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) risk (53:30); Dietary fuel preference with the ApoE4 allele (1:03:00); The role of omega-3 fatty acids in the brain (1:13:30); Comparing findings from the REDUCE-IT and STRENGTH trial (1:21:45): The relationship between dietary omega-3 intake and brain health (1:34:15); Preventing cognitive decline: A critical window for DHA in ApoE4 carriers? (1:42:30); Hussein’s ongoing research and recommendations for E4 carriers (1:54:00); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/

    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/HusseinYassine 

    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/

    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/

    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 2 hrs 6 min
    Guy Winch, Ph.D.: Emotional first aid and how to treat psychological injuries

    Guy Winch, Ph.D.: Emotional first aid and how to treat psychological injuries

    Guy Winch is a psychologist, author, and co-host of the Dear Therapist podcast. In this episode, Guy speaks to the commonality of the human condition with relatable stories from his decades of therapy sessions as well as his own experience with incessant rumination in the early days of his private practice. He shares insights on what he sees as an epidemic of rumination that leads to career burnout, the consequences of social comparison heightened by social media, and the psychological impact of not recognizing success. He emphasizes the need for a “psychological medicine cabinet” and provides concrete and practical tools for treating emotional injuries. He concludes with a discussion about the widespread impact of the coronavirus pandemic on emotional health and how we can use experienced psychologists in a time when it’s especially needed.

    We discuss:

    The unique format and impetus for Guy’s podcast with Lori Gottlieb (3:00); How Guy pieced together the many different schools of thought in psychology to develop his own unique approach (7:45); The most important component of successful therapy, and why it sometimes makes sense to “break the rules” (19:30); Insights extracted from Guy’s own battle with extreme stress and anxiety around finishing his education and starting his private practice (28:15); The epidemic of rumination, burnout, and the inability to psychologically leave work (34:15); Antidotes to incessant rumination, and tips for transitioning from work to home to avoid burnout (41:15); The psychology of complaining: The hidden cost of complaining incorrectly and benefits of learning how and when to complain (52:30); The consequences of social comparison, and the impact of “failure” on emotional health (1:02:15); How Guy helps people who struggle to acknowledge any level of success (1:07:30); Emotional first aid: The importance of a psychological medicine cabinet for treating emotional injuries (1:19:00); The role of therapists in normalizing the discussion of emotional injuries and illuminating the commonality of feelings (1:27:45); The widespread impact of the coronavirus pandemic on emotional health (1:35:15); How to properly use affirmations—a tool for treating psychological injuries (1:42:00); The importance of nuanced language and the stories we tell ourselves (1:47:30); Peter’s favorite episode of the Dear Therapist Podcast (1:53:15); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/

    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/guywinch

    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/

    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/

    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 1 hr 57 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

Zeynep Ertan ,

My most favorite podcast

Even tough it gets too technical for me this is really my most favorite podcast on longevity and all things health related. He just induces trust in me

Top Podcasts In Medicine

Listeners Also Subscribed To