1,621 episodes

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance — as well as science and technology.
 

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Economist Podcasts The Economist

    • News
    • 4.7 • 3 Ratings

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Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance — as well as science and technology.
 

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    The Intelligence: No water, no lights, no beds

    The Intelligence: No water, no lights, no beds

    Hardened war-zone doctors say the situation in Gaza is the worst they have witnessed—and that will cost lives long after the current conflict is resolved. Numbers from America’s tight labour market suggest that long-standing gaps between black and white workers are narrowing (09:57). And we speak with the maker of The Economist’s shiny new typeface (18:18).
    Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+
    If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you’ll have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.

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    • 23 min
    Babbage: The hunt for dark matter

    Babbage: The hunt for dark matter

    Dark matter is thought to make up around a quarter of the universe, but so far it has eluded detection by all scientific instruments. Scientists know it must exist because of the ways galaxies move and it also explains the large-scale structure of the modern universe. But no-one knows what dark matter actually is.
    Scientists have been hunting for dark matter particles for decades, but have so far had no luck. At the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, held recently in Denver, a new generation of researchers presented their latest tools, techniques and ideas to step up the search for this mysterious substance. Will they finally detect the undetectable? 
    Host: Alok Jha, The Economist’s science and technology editor. Contributors: Don Lincoln, senior scientist at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory; Christopher Karwin, a fellow at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center; Josef Aschbacher, boss of the European Space Agency; Michael Murra of Columbia University; Jodi Cooley, executive director of SNOLAB; Deborah Pinna of University of Wisconsin and CERN.
    Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+
    If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you’ll have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.

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    • 43 min
    The Intelligence: I’m your private lander, a lander for money

    The Intelligence: I’m your private lander, a lander for money

    If it succeeds—and that is no sure thing—this week’s soft landing of Odysseus will be the first by a private firm. We examine the prospects and the business models of the Moon rush. Our producer visits Ukraine to mark the anniversary of a revolution that helped to shape today’s conflict (11:22). And the rise and coming fall in entertaining British obituaries (21:25).
    Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+
    If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you’ll have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.

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    • 27 min
    The Intelligence: Faith-based reeling

    The Intelligence: Faith-based reeling

    China’s firms are shedding value at pace and foreign investors are starting to look elsewhere. We ask why faith is fading in a market that once looked unstoppable. Slam poetry, an American invention of the 1980s, is now conquering Francophone Africa (08:54). And why there are ever fewer athletes who excel at more than one sport (17:32).
    Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+
    If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you’ll have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.

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    • 23 min
    Drum Tower: New jello, new nail

    Drum Tower: New jello, new nail

    Twenty years ago Bill Clinton, then America’s president, joked that China would never be able to control the internet. “Like nailing jello to the wall” was how he described the party’s attempts to control the web. Yet it largely succeeded in creating an internet that serves its own purposes. Now, there is a new technology that could prove hard to nail too—artificial intelligence.

    Alice Su, our senior China correspondent, and Don Weinland, our China business and finance editor ask: Will China be able to harness the power of generative AI? And can it nail this new jello to the wall?

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    Sign up for a free trial of Economist Podcasts+. If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you’ll have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.

    The Intelligence: Russia after Navalny

    The Intelligence: Russia after Navalny

    At last President Vladimir Putin’s regime has succeeded in silencing the country’s most prominent opposition figure. What happens next? Demand for electric cars is weakening, particularly in Britain; we ask how to recharge the market (11:47). And what is remarkable about a stage production of “The Shawshank Redemption” in China (19:44).
    Get a world of insights for 50% off—subscribe to Economist Podcasts+
    If you’re already a subscriber to The Economist, you’ll have full access to all our shows as part of your subscription. For more information about how to access Economist Podcasts+, please visit our FAQs page or watch our video explaining how to link your account.

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    • 23 min

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