26 episodes

"What’s Going On? Eyes on Africa and the Caribbean" brings a biweekly conversation with people who know and work extensively and at the ground level in African and/or the Caribbean to the people of the African diaspora to keep us connected to the events and the places we love and left behind. Join us as we follow social and economic development issues in and around Africa and the Caribbean, including issues about youth, health, education, business, and emerging entrepreneurs. "What’s Going On? Eyes on Africa and the Caribbean" wants you to stay connected to the people and places that you love. Podcast cover photo by Etty Fidele on Unsplash

What's Going On? Eyes on Africa and the Caribbean Moronke Oshin-Martin & Grace Oshin

    • Society & Culture

"What’s Going On? Eyes on Africa and the Caribbean" brings a biweekly conversation with people who know and work extensively and at the ground level in African and/or the Caribbean to the people of the African diaspora to keep us connected to the events and the places we love and left behind. Join us as we follow social and economic development issues in and around Africa and the Caribbean, including issues about youth, health, education, business, and emerging entrepreneurs. "What’s Going On? Eyes on Africa and the Caribbean" wants you to stay connected to the people and places that you love. Podcast cover photo by Etty Fidele on Unsplash

    Abi Ogunbanjo Talks about the Opportunities and Challenges for Investors and Government in Nigeria

    Abi Ogunbanjo Talks about the Opportunities and Challenges for Investors and Government in Nigeria

    As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to batter economies worldwide, people around the world are reassessing the state of affairs and their country's wellbeing. In November 2021, Mr. Abimbola Ogunbanjo,  the head of Nigerian Exchange Group (NGX), hosted the first annual NGX Capital Markets Conference that brought together leading policymakers, financial experts, business leaders, investors, international development partners, and regulators to brainstorm ways to elevate the capital markets in Nigeria.  Specifically, the conference explored ways to increase the collaboration among key players in the nation’s economy in order to drive productive investments that would accelerate an elevated and digitized capital market. 
    This episode features Mr. Abimbola Ogunbanjo,  Chairman of the Nigerian Exchange Group, formerly the Nigerian Stock Exchange.  Abi, as his friends call him, discusses the opportunities and challenges for business and government in Nigeria, including the growth industries in Nigeria going into the future.   

    Abi recently engineered and oversaw the transition of the 60-year-old Nigerian Stock Exchange into what it is today with the goal of making, access to market easier.  

    As a demutualized entity, NGX, Mr. Ogunbanjo said is looking to: 
    accelerate new growth platforms. invest in new payment platforms. invest in central counterparts, declaring houses. NXE just launched a company called NG Clearing, which is a clearinghouse for derivatives.  
    "There are a number of areas that we're looking to strengthen our core in data and analytics and technology services, and to form strategic partnerships with fintechs."

    According to Abi Ogunbanjo, the conference is "the beginning of the dialogue that the exchange is having with its stakeholders because we believe that it requires a collective effort to improve the fortunes of the exchange on the economy."




     

    • 48 min
    A Dream Fulfilled: Camille Hastick Talks About Her Legendary Father's Legacy As a Caribbean American Business Leader

    A Dream Fulfilled: Camille Hastick Talks About Her Legendary Father's Legacy As a Caribbean American Business Leader

    The story of Roy Hastick is not your typical immigrant story.  On arriving in New York from his native Grenada in the early 1970s, Roy had a dream beyond just improving his own economic status.  His dream was to create access to business opportunities and wealth for people, particularly those in underserved communities so that their families have a chance to grow and to develop successfully.  

    Roy Hastick accomplished his dreams and more before he passed away in April 2020.  In this episode, his daughter, Camille, talks about her father's legacy and the brand new development of commercial and housing space on Flatbush Avenue and Caton Avenue in Brooklyn, New York, which is now the home of the Caribbean American Chamber of Commerce.   As CEO of the Caribbean American Chamber of Commerce, Roy Hastick created the project to be The Caribbean American Chamber of Commerce Trade Center.  Roy Hastick's Trade Center was officially dedicated in his honor on November 24, 2021.

    From starting out as a doorman to leading trade missions to the Caribbean region and representing the U.S. at the UN on economic development and business issues, Roy Hastick's story is a powerful story and one you will want to listen to.

    • 31 min
    Mañana Starts Today! Award-winning author Sandra Elaine Scott shares her joy of reading and writing

    Mañana Starts Today! Award-winning author Sandra Elaine Scott shares her joy of reading and writing

    In this episode, What's Going On? Eyes on Africa and the Caribbean brings you powerful and inspirational messages about life and happiness from Sandra Elaine Scott, an award-winning American author of adult and children’s books.   

    Her much-acclaimed book,  Mañana Starts Today! is an Amazon bestseller. She has appeared on several national and local news shows to discuss her books and other projects. She is a dynamic international speaker and coach who shares her joy of writing and life lessons. And being a boss author. Her best-selling strategies make her a highly sought-after presenter to speak to diverse audiences.
    Sandra Elaine Scott’s mission is to inspire joy and transforms lives with empowering messages and move people to action.   
    If you enjoyed what you heard today, you can learn more about Ms. Scott’s work and services at her website and social media sites:
    Website: sandraelainescott.com 
    Instagram: Sandrasvision 
    Twitter: @SandraElaineSco 
    Facebook: Sandrasvision1
     
    You can purchase her books from her website or at your favorite online bookstore.
     
    If would like to contact Ms. Scott as a keynote speaker, or for coach services, you can reach her at:
    Email: sandra@sandraelainescott.com
     

    • 51 min
    Part 2: The Caribbean Mosaics: A Home Away from Home

    Part 2: The Caribbean Mosaics: A Home Away from Home

    We continue our conversation with Dr. Fiona Vernal about an oral history project on the life and times of early West Indian settlers in the State of Connecticut. Dr. Vernal is an Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies,  and Director of the Center for Engaged, Public, Oral, and Community Histories (EPOCH) at the University of Connecticut.

    In our previous episode, Dr. Vernal talked to us about her research and current exhibit called The Caribbean Mosaic:  A  Home Away From Home, which is an oral history of the Caribbean migration to Connecticut beginning in the 1940s. The exhibit opened on June 23rd in Hartford, Connecticut. 

    In this episode, we're talking about some of the challenges facing this aging community of former migrant workers and their legacy, including:
     
    How to preserve the institutions they created {Fiona Vernal: "the importance of these organizations is now. Let's not wait until these organizations disappear and then we get really romantic about missing them. And let's say, these are the organizations that are on the ground, doing the work in the community that have the legitimacy and the authority to do some of this work and funds need to be flowing to us so that these agencies, subcontract with us to get some things done, [for example] to run tutoring programs that are culturally relevant..."

    Intervention to establish a functional and more updated leadership structure to advocate for and build financial support for the institutions.

    Encouraging the younger generation to embrace and protect the legacy. Dr. Vernal notes: "When we build organizations, whether we're like West Indian people or Nigerian people, or Cubans, whoever we are, [when] we build our community organizations, we have got to do succession planning." 
    Biography
    Dr. Fiona Vernal is Jamaican and grew up in Trenton, New Jersey. She is a graduate of Princeton and Yale, and teaches courses on pre-colonial, and colonial Africa, the history of South Africa, slavery, and the African diaspora. 
    In addition to creating a number of exhibits on her research, including the one we are discussing today, The Caribbean Mosaics, Dr. Vernal has written extensively on her research and consults with the Connecticut Historical Society on oral history projects.  Her current exhibit, “A Home Away From Home” is an oral history of the migration of West Indians to Connecticut.

    • 44 min
    The Caribbean Mosaics: A Home Away from Home

    The Caribbean Mosaics: A Home Away from Home

    This is part one of two episodes on The Caribbean Mosaics: A Home Away from Home in which Fiona Vernal, professor of History and Africana Studies at the University of Connecticut, explains how West Indians became the largest ethnic group in one New England State.  In this episode, Dr. Vernel takes us through the history of the West Indian Social Club and the migrant workers from the West Indies who founded it when they settled in the region in the 1940s. 

    They came as guest workers from all over the Caribbean.  Facing discrimination, they founded their own social, religious, and athletic organizations as autonomous cultural spaces and networks beginning with the West Indian Social Club in 1950, followed by the Caribbean American Society, the Barbados American Society, the Trinidad & Tobago American Society, the Jamaica Progressive League, the St Lucia American Society and the Cricket Hall of Fame among others.

    The Social Club is a veritable treasure trove of memories that documents the lives and experiences of the farmworkers. Dr. Vernal started preserving these memories through an exhibition in collaboration with the Connecticut historical society.

    "It has been a long-term goal of mine to build on that experience from the 1940s and continue the oral history project and then share and showcase the oral histories. So that's what we are doing now, " said Dr. Vernal.

    She added: "This pandemic has demonstrated to us how critical foreign guest workers are to the infrastructure of this country. And I think that with renewed attention on the fact that folks are coming here, a lot of them are invited here and they make really important contributions to our food security and to our economic prosperity and productivity. And I want to do something to showcase the origins of those programs in the 1940s.

    The latest exhibit called the Caribbean Mosaic opens on June 23, 2021, at the West Indian Social Club in Hartford Connecticut. 

    You can also view it online at:  https://www.caribbeanmosaics.com/

    If you are interested in supporting the Oral History project or would like to borrow the exhibit for your own showing, contact:

    Dr. Fiona Vernal
    Associate Professor
    History and Africana Studies
    Director, Engaged, Public, Oral, and Community Histories (EPOCH)
    University of Connecticut
    (203)-687-3479
    http://history.uconn.edu/faculty-by-name/fiona-vernal/

    Let us know what you think.  Leave What's Going On? Eyes on Africa and the Caribbean a review on the podcast platform.
     

    • 1 hr 2 min
    The U.K.'s Hostile Environment: A Conversation with Colin Bobb-Semple, Part 2

    The U.K.'s Hostile Environment: A Conversation with Colin Bobb-Semple, Part 2

    This is Part 2 of two episodes on the British Government's immigration policy called the "Hostile Environment Policy " that targeted UK's Black immigrant population and forced the deportation of thousands of Caribbean and African immigrants.

    In our last episode, British lawyer and University Law Lecturer, Colin Bobb-Semple explained what is now known as the Windrush Scandal, what caused it, and how UK’s Caribbean population from the Windrush Generation became victims of a "Hostile Environment Policy" even though they were legal citizens of the UK. 

    In this episode. we continue our conversation with Colin Bobb-Semple who discusses the devastating impact of the immigration policy on the lives of generations of British citizens from the Caribbean and Africa and explains why the UK's  Hostile Environment Policy remains a threat to Black Britons even as government leaders acknowledge that they were wrong and the policy was bad.



     
     
     

    • 50 min

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