35 個單集

An exploration of British slang for English learners, native speakers and anyone in between. Giving you a chance to hear, understand the origins and meanings of new slang and to use it immediately!

The Slang Podcast - Learn British English Now The Slang Podcast

    • 語言學習
    • 5.0・2 則評分

An exploration of British slang for English learners, native speakers and anyone in between. Giving you a chance to hear, understand the origins and meanings of new slang and to use it immediately!

    Salty - What does "Salty" mean in British slang?

    Salty - What does "Salty" mean in British slang?

    So you have planned three holidays, booked time off work and are totally ready to lay on a beach sipping pina coladas under the sun. This I am sure were many of your summer plans, unfortunately they have been put on hold due to the recent pandemic.

    How do you feel now? Angry? Disappointed? Salty? Yes Salty!

    Let me explain myself, in formal english Salty S-A-L-T-Y is an adjective meaning tasting or containing salt, Of course, you may have assumed that it was in relation to food. For example:

    - "damn you over salted this chicken."
    - "these chips are really too salty"

    In slang we can also say a person is salty. No I do not mean one should go around licking their friends and commenting on their taste.

    In slang salty is an adjective of emotion. Feeling salty is akin to feeling upset or angry. It can be over something minor, like getting teased or sometimes over something larger like your holiday plans being cancelled.

    So where does it come from and why do we use it?
    In fact the term salty comes from US slang and was first attested in 1938. It has the same meaning as today, to be angry and irritated.

    Surprisingly it stemmed from referring to sailors, who were tough and aggressive. In naval terms, the salty guys were the ones who have been on ship for a long time such as sailors and marines. During this time at sea, the ocean waves would knock them around, they would work very hard and while at the top of the ship, the salty sea and air would permeate their clothes and skin, they would feel rough and exhausted and salty.

    Now many of us are not sailors battling against the harsh sea, yet we still use salty to describe our emotions. As such "Man, I can’t believe James didn’t want to date you. Are you sad or just salty?" or "Why are you so damn salty today?"

    That’s the end of our episode of the day so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! So what makes you salty? Let us know! You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.
    Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 3 分鐘
    Sick - What does "Sick" mean in British slang?

    Sick - What does "Sick" mean in British slang?

    My friend Kelly used to work at an Italian Pizzeria in Canterbury. She worked with many Italian chefs and would compliment them on the daily pasta specials looking ‘sick’.

    Their response was usually one of embarrassment or anger, thinking she had insulted their cooking. A basic cardinal sin in Italy. This led to an awkward work environment to say the least, until so explained ‘sick’ was not an insult at all but in fact a compliment!

    Sick S-I-C-K in formal English means to not be in good health. If you are sick you should stay at home and get lots of rest!

    However, as we know slang likes to make every formal word very confusing, just like back slang. If you can’t remember what that is go back and check out episode 3 on our website.

    So in slang sick is an adjective describing something that is cool or excellent. To describe something being sick is to give a compliment. For example:

    - Whoa, your new car is sick!

    This word stems from the US and its early uses have been traced to jazz slang popular in the 1920s onwards. It began to find popularly and was frequently used in the UK from the early 2000s.

    So if someone from the UK comments that you look sick, don’t worry, you don’t need to rush home and check your temperature. You look great!

    That’s the end of our episode so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! You can find us on our website the https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page http://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 2 分鐘
    A Few Sandwiches Short of a Picnic - What does "A Few Sandwiches Short of a Picnic" mean in British slang?

    A Few Sandwiches Short of a Picnic - What does "A Few Sandwiches Short of a Picnic" mean in British slang?

    Today we will be exploring idiomatic phrases that I would say are rare gems of slang. Before we start, I want to give you some context.

    You and your friend have decided to go for a day at the beach, you have been planning this trip for a long time, you have organised everything and finally the morning comes. Just as you are about to set off your friend, who should be driving informs you that his driving license expired one month ago!

    Now what would we say about this friend, that he is stupid? dumb? Oh no we can be much more creative than that!

    How about using some idiomatic phrases?

    We could say that this person is a few two sandwiches short of a picnic. This phrase is used to indicate in a humorous way that you think someone is very stupid or is behaving very strangely. Basically meaning they are almost complete but not fully. 'A few sandwiches short of a picnic' is fairly recent. The first citation of it was documented in a BBC's Christmas Special in December 1987.

    This pejorative phrase meaning not very intelligent or of questionable mental capacity can appear in many different forms and variations .

    There are many phrases of the form 'an X short of a Y'. These all mean the same thing, that is, the person being spoken of is stupid. The 'short of' insult began in Australia and New Zealand in the mid 19th century.

    I have found it can be traced back to 1852 when Colonel Godfrey Mundy wrote:

    - "Let no man having, a shingle short try this country."

    Basically meaning that he did not want anyone stupid to come and live in his country.

    Many of these phrases have been adapted while always including having something loose or missing for example we could say something is A few crumbs short of a biscuit or A few cards short of a full deck. So the next time you want to call someone stupid try to be a bit more creative about it! Remember the form 'an X short of a Y'.

    That’s the end of our episode so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you!

    If you can think of any great Slang insults we would love to hear them.

    You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps.

    Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 3 分鐘
    Bob's your uncle and Fanny’s your aunt - What does "Bob's Your Uncle" and "Fanny’s your aunt" mean in British slang?

    Bob's your uncle and Fanny’s your aunt - What does "Bob's Your Uncle" and "Fanny’s your aunt" mean in British slang?

    Things don’t seem easy these days, whether you're setting up an online bank account, learning how to work i-teach platform to teach your students, or finding the right ingredients in the supermarket to make your boyfriend's favorite cake.

    I hope things feel easier soon, and to prepare you for when they are I have a few phrases to teach you today.

    Imagine it is summer 2019 and you want to go to the beach, well hop in your car, drive for twenty 20 minutes and Bob’s your uncle you are there!

    No no I am not talking about your literal uncle at the beach."Bob's your uncle" is a phrase commonly used in United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries that means "and there it is" or "and there you have it.".

    However a recent article from the New York Magazine asked ten different Brits what the expression means and got ten different answers, ranging from "anything's possible" to "there you are".

    Simply translated we could say that this phrase means that the activity you have done or want to do is simply and easy. Typically someone says it to conclude a set of simple instructions or when a result is reached. The meaning is similar to that of the French expression "et voilà!" or the American phrase "easy as pie".

    This expression was first coined in 1887. The origins are uncertain, but a common theory is that the expression arose after Conservative Prime Minister Robert Cecil known as Bob appointed his nephew Arthur Balfour as Chief Secretary for Ireland in 1887, an act of favoritism which was apparently both surprising and unpopular. Whatever other qualifications Balfour might have had, "Bob's your uncle" was seen as the main one. So "Bob's your uncle" is another way of saying "your success is guaranteed."

    Remember your pronunciation when you use this phrase as it is contracted, we don’t say Bob's your uncle, but it is more fluid such as bobsyauncle.

    A phrase with the same meaning is ‘Fanny’s your aunt’. When used together it means complete or the whole lot. If Bob's your uncle and Fanny's your aunt you've got a full set of relatives and you are complete.

    Today we can use it like this:

    - Where is the post office ?
    - Go straight on until you reach the park, take the first right, and Bob’s your uncle - you're there!

    That’s the end of our episode of the day so remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 3 分鐘
    Beat - What does "Beat" mean in British slang?

    Beat - What does "Beat" mean in British slang?

    As I have been trapped inside for a while now, I have been "face timing" many of my close friends who are far away, as I am sure you have all been doing. While speaking to my closest friend Ella I commented:

    - "woah! Your face looks absolutely beat!"

    You may think this comment is strange as in formal beat BEAT the word beat has negative and strong connotations.

    In formal English beat has many meanings as a verb. Firstly beat can mean to defeat someone in a game or other competitive situation. Used as so:

    - "France beat Portugal in 2000 in a great football match"

    It could also mean to strike someone or something repeatedly and violently. As a noun it is the main accent or rhythmic unit in music or poetry. Finally beat can be used as an adjective meaning completely exhausted. For example:

    - "I'm beat—I need an hour or so to rest"

    However when I commented on the appearance of my friends face I was not referring to any of these meanings. The slang term beat B-E-A-T isn’t as aggressive as it sounds. In slang “Beat” can be used as a verb or adjective, and surprisingly it is about beauty and makeup. The verb to beat refers to the application of one's makeup. As an adjective beat means someone either applied their makeup well, or just applied a lot of it. For example:

    - " You face looks beat! Where are you going out tonight?"

    The term is popular among makeup enthusiasts and the gay community. You can find many examples of ‘beat’ being used in the fantastic ball culture documentary Paris Is Burning created in 1991.

    So to clarify when I commented that Ella’s Face was beat I was telling her that her makeup looked beautiful and very professional.

    So if your feeling bored at home, get your makeup out and beat your face!

    That’s the end of our episode, remember to tune in for our next episode to see what new slang we have in store for you! You can find us on our website http://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 3 分鐘
    Shook - What does "Shook" mean in British slang?

    Shook - What does "Shook" mean in British slang?

    Before we get started I wanted to say a few words about the current global situation.
    In desperate times we feel panicked and scared for many reasons. I want to thank everyone who is helping us during this crisis, especially doctors and nurses tirelessly working against this pandemic.

    All we can do is wait, be kind to each other and most importantly stay inside.

    It's safe to say we are all shook. Shook S-H-O-O-K is a slang term that can be used as an adjective meaning shocked, surprised, or startled. The inner monologue for feeling shook is thinking:

    - ‘Whoa, what just happened?’

    In formal English shook is the past participle of the verb to shake. To shake is to move backwards and forwards or up and down in quick, short movements, or to make something or someone do this. Many things can shake your body and your voice usually, because you are frightened or nervous. For example:

    - ‘Her voice shook as she talked about the person who attacked her.’

    There is a perfect Idiom reflecting the word shook which you may all know as shaking like a leaf. If you say that someone is shaking like a leaf, you mean that their body is shaking a lot, for instance because they are very cold or frightened. If someone says I was shaking like a leaf before the test, it means they were very nervous.

    My guess would be that S-H-O-O-K came from the old phrase “shook up” that was used in the 19th century. Shook up meant to be excited in those times and was revived in 1957 by Elvis Presley.

    So in slang Shook describes feelings ranging from discombobulation and fear to rage and elation, kind of like "all shaken up." We could use it like this:

    - ‘How you feeling about the current social and economical climate?’
    - ‘To be honest Im shook’.

    That’s the end of our episode, remember to tune in for our next episode so see what new slang we have in store for you! You can find us on our website https://theslangpodcast.com and from there you can see our transcript and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and many more apps. Or head over to our facebook page https://facebook.com/theslangpodcast for updates and more slang!

    • 3 分鐘

客戶評論

5.0(滿分 5 分)
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2 則評分

許嗶嘰

love your podcast

Hi, this is Iâu from Taiwan. Thanks for putting the script in the note, this helps me to understand the usage of words much clearly.

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