352 episodes

Crackers and Grape Juice began in the spring of 2016 with a conversation between Jason Micheli and Teer Hardy. In the years since, two shows have been added to the lineup, Strangely Warmed and (Her)Men*You*Tics, but the goal has remained the same: talking about faith without using stained-glass language.

Crackers and Grape Juice Crackers and Grape Juice

    • Religion & Spirituality

Crackers and Grape Juice began in the spring of 2016 with a conversation between Jason Micheli and Teer Hardy. In the years since, two shows have been added to the lineup, Strangely Warmed and (Her)Men*You*Tics, but the goal has remained the same: talking about faith without using stained-glass language.

    Episode 334 : Kenneth Tanner - Our Hardened Hearts: The Plague of School Shootings, the Idolatry of ______, and the Light that IS Winning

    Episode 334 : Kenneth Tanner - Our Hardened Hearts: The Plague of School Shootings, the Idolatry of ______, and the Light that IS Winning

    Back on the podcast is our friend, Father Kenneth Tanner. Ken is the rector of Holy Redeemer in Rochester Hills, Michigan and a writer for Christianity Today, Mockingbird, Clarion, and The Huffington Post. Oxford High School, the site of the latest school shooting in the US, is in Holy Redeemer's parish, and Kenneth joined us on the podcast to talk about his experience of providing pastoral care to the students, families, and teachers in the immediate aftermath of the tragedy.

    • 48 min
    Episode 333 : Kara Slade - The Fullness of Time : Jesus Christ, Science, and Modernity

    Episode 333 : Kara Slade - The Fullness of Time : Jesus Christ, Science, and Modernity

    While human existence in time is determined by the time of Jesus Christ, by the logic of the incarnation, passion, resurrection, and ascension, the predominant accounts of time in the modern West have proceeded from a very different basis. The implications of these approaches are not just a matter of epistemology, or of abstract doctrinal and philosophical claims. Instead, they have had, and continue to have, concrete ramifications for human life together. They have overwhelmingly been death-dealing rather than life-giving, marked by a series of temporal moral errors that this book hopes to address. As a counterexample, this book reads Søren Kierkegaard alongside Karl Barth to highlight the ways that both figures rejected a Hegelian approach to time that was, and is, not coincidentally intertwined with a racialized account of history and the co-opting of Christianity by the modern Western state.

    Our guest for #333 is Dr. Kara Slade.

    Kara serves as associate rector at Trinity Church, associate chaplain of the Episcopal Church at Princeton, and Canon Theologian of the Diocese of New Jersey. A native of Pensacola, Florida and lifelong Southerner, she received her PhD in Christian theology and ethics at Duke University in 2018, with research interests that include Karl Barth, Søren Kierkegaard, and the ethics of science, technology, and medicine. She serves on the Committee for the Priesthood of the Diocese of New Jersey and the General Board of Examining Chaplains, and is also the past chair of the Society of Scholar-Priests.

    • 1 hr
    Episode 332 : Ben Maddison & Keith Voets - A One Step Plan to Revitalize Decline in the Church

    Episode 332 : Ben Maddison & Keith Voets - A One Step Plan to Revitalize Decline in the Church

    Ben Maddison is a priest at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in New Jersey, and Keith Voets is the rector at The Episcopal Church of St. Alban the Martyr, Queens, N.Y. They joined Jason and the Minion in a conversation about re-centering the Church on the Gospel.

    Here's the post that got the conversation started:

    There's some on-going ✨ Discourse ™️✨ in The Episcopal Church about ways to reverse decline. Some ideas are good, some not so good, some the same old nonsense that always comes up in the course of these conversations.
    So here's my one-step plan to revitalize decline:
    Proclaim the Good News of the Gospel: the transformative reality that Jesus Christ—in his life, death, and resurrection—fundamentally changes absolutely every aspect of who we are, how we live, how we love, and how we act in the world—a stark transformation that can only be described as a "death" of the old and resurrection of the new. Forgiveness, mercy, grace, love, and justice flow (by the power and inspiration of the Holy Spirit) from the incomprehensible reality that "we love because he first loved us."
    Nothing comes before this. Everything flows from it. This is the center and ground of who we are.
    If everything we have and are—our structures, bureaucracy, liturgy, teaching, preaching, stewardship, pastoral care, fights for justice—has this at the center, "who can stand against us?"

    • 56 min
    Episode 331: Matthew Milliner - The Everlasting People: G. K. Chesterton and the First Nations

    Episode 331: Matthew Milliner - The Everlasting People: G. K. Chesterton and the First Nations

    What does the cross of Christ have to do with the thunderbird? How might the life and work of Christian writer G. K. Chesterton shed light on our understanding of North American Indigenous art and history? This unexpected connection forms the basis of these discerning reflections by art historian Matthew Milliner. In this fifth volume in the Hansen Lectureship Series, Milliner appeals to Chesterton's life and work―including The Everlasting Man, his neglected poetry, his love for his native England, and his own visits to America―in order to understand and appreciate both Indigenous art and the complex, often tragic history of First Nations peoples, especially in the American Midwest. The Hansen Lectureship series offers accessible and insightful reflections by Wheaton College faculty on the transformative work of the Wade Center authors.

    Friend of the podcast, Dr. Matt Milliner, is back on the program to talk about his new work, The Everlasting People: G. K. Chesterton and the First Nations. Matt is a Professor of Art History at Wheaton College.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Episode 330: Gretchen Purser - Election Day Special

    Episode 330: Gretchen Purser - Election Day Special

    Gretchen Purser is the host of the podcast, The Mess is Mine.

    Gretchen is a recovering evangelical, former political hack and a Republican refugee. She built a 20 year career working for national Republican campaigns, candidates, and committees and their adorable baby brother, the religious right. She’s seen a lot of sh@t. She joins us to talk faith and politics on Election Day 2021.

    https://themessismine.com/

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    • 1 hr 11 min
    Episode 329 : John Archibald - Shaking the Gates of Hell

    Episode 329 : John Archibald - Shaking the Gates of Hell

    On growing up in the American South of the 1960s--an all-American white boy--son of a long line of Methodist preachers, in the midst of the civil rights revolution, and discovering the culpability of silence within the church. By the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and columnist for The Birmingham News.

    "My dad was a Methodist preacher and his dad was a Methodist preacher," writes John Archibald. "It goes all the way back on both sides of my family. When I am at my best, I think it comes from that sermon place."

    Everything Archibald knows and believes about life is "refracted through the stained glass of the Southern church. It had everything to do with people. And fairness. And compassion."

    In Shaking the Gates of Hell, Archibald asks: Can a good person remain silent in the face of discrimination and horror, and still be a good person?

    Archibald had seen his father, the Rev. Robert L. Archibald, Jr., the son and grandson of Methodist preachers, as a moral authority, a moderate and a moderating force during the racial turbulence of the '60s, a loving and dependable parent, a forgiving and attentive minister, a man many Alabamians came to see as a saint. But was that enough? Even though Archibald grew up in Alabama in the heart of the civil rights movement, he could recall few words about racial rights or wrongs from his father's pulpit at a time the South seethed, and this began to haunt him.

    In this moving and powerful book, Archibald writes of his complex search, and of the conspiracy of silence his father faced in the South, in the Methodist Church and in the greater Christian church. Those who spoke too loudly were punished, or banished, or worse. Archibald's father was warned to guard his words on issues of race to protect his family, and he did. He spoke to his flock in the safety of parable, and trusted in the goodness of others, even when they earned none of it, rising through the ranks of the Methodist Church, and teaching his family lessons in kindness and humanity, and devotion to nature and the Earth.

    Archibald writes of this difficult, at times uncomfortable, reckoning with his past in this unadorned, affecting book of growth and evolution.

    • 1 hr 1 min

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