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A podcast for all ancient history fans! The Ancients is dedicated to discussing our distant past. Featuring interviews with historians and archaeologists, each episode covers a specific theme from antiquity. From Neolithic Britain to the Fall of Rome. Hosted by Tristan Hughes. 

The Ancients History Hit Network

    • История

A podcast for all ancient history fans! The Ancients is dedicated to discussing our distant past. Featuring interviews with historians and archaeologists, each episode covers a specific theme from antiquity. From Neolithic Britain to the Fall of Rome. Hosted by Tristan Hughes. 

    Alexander the Great & The Persian Thermopylae (Part Two)

    Alexander the Great & The Persian Thermopylae (Part Two)

    In this second part of Tristan’s explainer, he takes us right into the heart of the battle dubbed the Persian Thermopylae. Listen as Alexander begins a full-blooded assault on the Persian Gates, and find out how this battle for the Persian heartlands ended.
     
    Preorder Tristan’s book today: https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-Perdiccas-Years-323320-BC-Hardback/p/20188
     
    Jona Lendering article: https://www.livius.org/articles/battle/persian-gate-330-bce/
     
    The narrow Yasuj pass.
     
    If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit.
     
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    Further Reading
    Hammond, M. (2013), tr., Arrian: Alexander the Great, the Anabasis and the Indica, Oxford.
    Shepherd, R. (1793), tr., Polyaenus: Stratagems of War, Chicago.
    Waterfield, R. (2019), tr., Diodorus of Sicily: The Library, Books 16-20, Oxford.
    Yardley, J. (2001), tr., The History of Alexander: Quintus Curtius Rufus, Chatham.


    Bosworth, A. B. (1988), Conquest and Empire: The Reign of Alexander the Great, Cambridge.
    Engels, D. W. (1978), Alexander the Great and the Logistics of the Macedonian Army, London.
    Heckel, W. (2006), Who's Who in the Age of Alexander the Great, Oxford.
     
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    • 39 мин.
    Alexander the Great & The Persian Thermopylae (Part One)

    Alexander the Great & The Persian Thermopylae (Part One)

    In January 330 BC, Alexander the Great faced one of his most difficult challenges to date. A small Persian force, entrenched in a formidable defensive position that blockaded Alexander’s route to the Persian heartlands. A narrow pass through the Zagros Mountains that has gone down in history as the Persian, or Susian, Gates. Although nowhere near the size or scale of Alexander’s previous pitched battles against the Persians at the Granicus, Issus and Gaugamela, this clash in the mountains deserves its moment in the spotlight. A clash where the tables were turned and the Persians were outnumbered by their Macedonian counterparts. A battle that has been dubbed the Persian Thermopylae. From the immediate aftermath of Alexander’s victory at Gaugamela to his army’s antics at Babylon. From a merciless, punitive campaign in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains to a detailed run down of the Persian stand the Gates, enjoy as Tristan talks you through the events of late 331 / early 330 BC.


    In this first part, Tristan covers the events that followed Alexander the Great’s victory at Gaugamela and how these culminated with Alexander’s army approaching the Persian heartlands deep in the winter of 331/0 BC.


    Preorder Tristan’s book today: https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/The-Perdiccas-Years-323320-BC-Hardback/p/20188


    Jona Lendering article: https://www.livius.org/articles/battle/persian-gate-330-bce/


    If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit.
     
    To download, go to Android or Apple store.
     
    If you’re enjoying this podcast and looking for more fascinating The Ancients content then subscribe to our Ancients newsletter. Follow this link.


    Quick notes:
    We do hear a small detail about what happened to Bagophanes. Alexander assigned him to become one of Mazaeus' adjutants in the new Babylonian administration.
    Medates is pardoned by Alexander. Whether he retains his position as governor of the lowland Uxians however, is not stated.


    Further Reading
    Hammond, M. (2013), tr., Arrian: Alexander the Great, the Anabasis and the Indica, Oxford.
    Shepherd, R. (1793), tr., Polyaenus: Stratagems of War, Chicago.
    Waterfield, R. (2019), tr., Diodorus of Sicily: The Library, Books 16-20, Oxford.
    Yardley, J. (2001), tr., The History of Alexander: Quintus Curtius Rufus, Chatham.


    Bosworth, A. B. (1988), Conquest and Empire: The Reign of Alexander the Great, Cambridge.
    Engels, D. W. (1978), Alexander the Great and the Logistics of the Macedonian Army, London.
    Heckel, W. (2006), Who's Who in the Age of Alexander the Great, Oxford.
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 38 мин.
    The Birth of the Roman Empire

    The Birth of the Roman Empire

    16 January 27 BC is a date sometimes associated with the beginning of the Roman Empire. It was on that day that Octavian received the name Augustus, effectively becoming the first emperor of Rome. Augustus ordered the gates of Janus to be closed, marking an end to the period of Civil War that had characterised Rome for decades before. Entering into a new era of peace, how did Augustus monopolise peace as a concept, and allow Rome to hold onto this new era and way of life across it's Empire? This week Tristan is joined by Dr Hannah Cornwell, author of Pax and the Politics of Peace, to talk about this transitional period, it's reflections in art and monumental architecture, and ultimately, how the Roman Empire came to be.


    If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit
    https://access.historyhit.com/?utm_source=audio&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Podcast+Campaign&utm_id=Podcast


    To download, go to Android or Apple store:
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.historyhit&hl=en_GB&gl=US
    https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/history-hit/id1303668247


    If you’re enjoying this podcast and looking for more fascinating The Ancients content then subscribe to our Ancients newsletter. Follow the link here:
    https://www.historyhit.com/sign-up-to-history-hit/?utm_source=timelinenewsletter&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Timeline+Podcast+Campaign
     
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    • 50 мин.
    The Seleucid Empire: In the Shadow of Rome

    The Seleucid Empire: In the Shadow of Rome

    At its height, the Seleucid Empire stretched from Thrace (modern day Bulgaria) to the Indus River Valley. Emerging from the tumultuous ‘Successor Wars’ that followed Alexander the Great’s passing, for over a century it was a superpower of the eastern Mediterranean. This, however, ultimately led it into conflict with Rome at the beginning of the 2nd century BC. The result was a devastating defeat for the Seleucid King Antiochus III ‘the Great’ at the Battle of Magnesia, fought around this time of year in either December 190 BC or January 189 BC. Following the battle, the Seleucids were humbled by a damaging treaty, but what happened next? What followed for the Seleucids, having been humbled by the Romans? Did they descend from superpower to suppliant? Or did they experience a resurgence? In today’s podcast, Eduardo Garcia-Molina, a PHD Classics student at the University of Chicago, argues the latter. Focusing in on the reign of Antiochus IV, Eduardo highlights how the Seleucid Empire remained a powerful entity in the wake of Magnesia and their Roman defeat.


    If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit
    https://access.historyhit.com/?utm_source=audio&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Podcast+Campaign&utm_id=Podcast


    To download, go to Android or Apple store:
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.historyhit&hl=en_GB&gl=US
    https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/history-hit/id1303668247


    If you’re enjoying this podcast and looking for more fascinating The Ancients content then subscribe to our Ancients newsletter. Follow the link here:
    https://www.historyhit.com/sign-up-to-history-hit/?utm_source=timelinenewsletter&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Timeline+Podcast+Campaign
     
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    • 1 ч. 3 мин.
    Spinning in the Roman World

    Spinning in the Roman World

    Spinning held an important place in ancient society, and no, we're not talking about ancient exercise classes. A task for women and slaves, it was used to create clothes, ships sails, and ropes, and its products were integral to all parts of society. An unchanging art for centuries and seen across the globe, spinning was an important practice in the ancient world. This week Tristan is joined by Carey Fleiner to discuss spinning's role in myths, the textiles it helped produce, and its importance in antiquity.


    Warning: one case of mild language.


    If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit
    https://access.historyhit.com/?utm_source=audio&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Podcast+Campaign&utm_id=Podcast To download, go to Android or Apple store:
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.historyhit&hl=en_GB&gl=US
    https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/history-hit/id1303668247


    If you’re enjoying this podcast and looking for more fascinating Ancients content then subscribe to our Ancients newsletter. Follow the link here:
    https://www.historyhit.com/sign-up-to-history-hit/?utm_source=timelinenewsletter&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Timeline+Podcast+Campaign
     
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    • 1 ч. 7 мин.
    Cannibalism

    Cannibalism

    It’s a macabre topic to discuss, but also one that has fascinated people for generations. So what has archaeology revealed about cannibalism among prehistoric societies? And if cannibalism does seem to have been practised among certain groups, then why? Appalachian State University’s Dr Marc Kissel dialled in from North Carolina to talk us through several cases of potential cannibalism in prehistory, from Neanderthals to the Neolithic.


    Marc’s Twitter: @MarcKissel


    While you’re here, don’t forget to leave us a rating and review.


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    Music: Ancient Secrets - Storyblocks
     
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    • 49 мин.

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