300 episodes

Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

Outlook BBC

    • Personal Journals
    • 5.0, 2 Ratings

Extraordinary first person stories from around the world

    Students by day and hostage negotiators by night

    Students by day and hostage negotiators by night

    In 1994 Robert Clerx was studying in Colombia, when an old school friend, Miles Hargrove asked him for a very large favour. To help him buy back his father. The boys had been friends since Miles and his family had moved to Colombia from America for his dad’s job. Then Miles’ dad was kidnapped by the Farc guerrilla group, who demanded a six million dollar ransom and would only negotiate with family, or a friend. But the family didn’t feel confident that their Spanish was good enough to take on such a delicate and risky task. So they asked for Robert's help. Miles' film about their ordeal is called: Miracle Fishing.

    Picture: Miles Hargrove and the team planning his dad's hostage negotiations
    Credit: Miles Hargrove

    • 39 min
    The weird world I was warned to keep secret

    The weird world I was warned to keep secret

    Pauline Dakin is a Canadian journalist, broadcaster and a professor of journalism in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Growing up in the 1970s and 1980s, her childhood was marked by many mysterious incidents and unexplained getaways - where her family suddenly had to flee at a moment's notice and she couldn't talk to anyone about what was going on. Pauline tells Jo Fidgen how she managed to uncover her family's extraordinary secret - including a hidden community called the 'weird world'.

    This interview was first broadcast in December 2017

    Presenter: Jo Fidgen
    Producers: Becky Vincent, Thomas Harding-Assinder, Maryam Maruf

    Picture: Pauline Dakin
    Picture credit: Penguin

    • 40 min
    My search for my sister, the "keeper of memories"

    My search for my sister, the "keeper of memories"

    Nakuset only goes by one name and it means "The Sun" in her indigenous Canadian culture. Born into an abusive household, her early days were difficult and it wasn't long before she and her sister Sonya were taken into care by social services. This was the 1970s, and there was a widespread policy of taking indigenous children and putting them up for adoption with white families, removing them from their culture in the process. Nakuset was adopted, her sister wasn't. It was a painful process for Nakuset, but her eventual reunion with Sonya as an adult helped her get in touch with her heritage. The two sisters became close, but sadly their respective childhood experiences had left them scarred, and the reunion didn't have a fairy-tale ending.

    Presenter: Jo Fidgen
    Producer: Harry Graham

    Photo credit: Nakuset

    • 23 min
    The woman in lockdown with 70 spiders

    The woman in lockdown with 70 spiders

    Caitlin Henderson loves spiders. For the last few months, she was working for a travelling spider exhibition in Australia. When the coronavirus pandemic hit, she had reached Queensland – the venues shut down and the spiders needed somewhere to go. Suddenly Caitlin found herself living in lockdown with 70 spiders in her rented bedroom. Welcome to ‘Hotel Arachnid’.

    Presenter: Jo Fidgen
    Producer: Maryam Maruf

    Picture: Caitlin Henderson surrounded by spiders
    Credit: Caitlin Henderson

    • 14 min
    How I created the first Chinese Superman character

    How I created the first Chinese Superman character

    Gene Luen Yang grew up in a Chinese family in the United States, and when his mum bought him his first Superman comic, the story immediately resonated with him. Gene went on to become a cartoonist, and he even helped create the first Chinese Superman character. He is also the first graphic novelist to be a finalist for the National Book Award and his most recent book is called Dragon Hoops.

    Presenter: Emily Webb.
    Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

    Picture: Gene Luen Yang.
    Credit: Courtesy of Gene Luen Yang.

    • 24 min
    The refugee lawyer prosecuting IS war crimes

    The refugee lawyer prosecuting IS war crimes

    Rez Gardi grew up in a refugee camp - the child of Kurdish human rights activists who had fled to Pakistan. For years she was denied an education, but she excelled anyway. Now she is a Harvard educated lawyer and she is fighting to prosecute IS war crimes in Iraq.

    Presenter: Emily Webb.
    Producer: Harry Graham.

    Picture: Rez Gardi.
    Credit: Courtesy of Rez Gardi.

    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

Ntaryebwa Mukama (Uganda) ,

Incredible Stories.

Hi my name is Ntaryebwa Mukama and I am from Uganda.
I listen to outlook live whenever I am up country and download podcasts whenever in Kampala since I'm very busy there.
I must first of all applaud the BBC especially the outlook team for the effort you guys put in to look for humans like the ones that appear live on outlook.
The stories are very incredible, emotional at times, motivational and they just redefine life.
It's very encouraging to know that someone overcame a situation at a time no one thought they would.
You guys have taken journalism to a whole new level.
Thank you and thank you.
I am a very conservative software engineer but bbc outlook has made me start to appreciate each discipline in this life.
I've really learnt more than I thought I'd ever learn from radio.
I'd like to say that I appreciate the effort you guys always put in.
Thank you for redefining radio.
Much love from my motherland Uganda.

Top Podcasts In Personal Journals

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by BBC