1 hr 2 min

#004: An Editor's Insight | Coburn Dukehart Photo Forward

All you younger photographers, all you independent photographers, all you freelancers – break out the notebooks because this episode is not one you’ll want to miss. While we’ve talked in previous episodes about making photographs and crafting stories that are meaningful, we haven’t really looked hard at how to get that work seen by the world. (Don’t worry, in a future episode of Photo Forward, we’ll be talking with an expert on pricing and the financial side of creating your work.) But today we’re taking a brief detour from photographers to take a deep dive into the other side of visual storytelling: photo EDITING, with today’s guest Coburn Dukehart.

Coburn Dukehart is the Digital and Multimedia Director for the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism where she directs its visual strategy, creates visual and audio content, manages digital assets and trains student and professional journalists. Our conversation centered around her decades of distinguished work at national news organizations as a photo editor for National Geographic, National Public Radio, and The Washington Post among others.

Coburn has received numerous multimedia awards from the National Press Photographers Association, POYI and the White House News Photographers Association. Her multimedia work also has been honored with a Webby, a Gracie, a Murrow and duPont awards, not to mention a nomination for a national Emmy.

In this episode, Coburn and I talk extensively about a number of visual storytelling topics like: what to do and what NOT to do when you’re making a story pitch to an editor, why building trust with the individuals in your photo stories is critical to making meaningful visual work, and how understanding the ethics of shooting and publishing photos (even captioning them!) can make a key impact on how visual media is viewed. You can find show notes with photos we talked about and links online at photoforward.media/podcast/Coburn . So, without further ado, our interview with Coburn Dukehart.

All you younger photographers, all you independent photographers, all you freelancers – break out the notebooks because this episode is not one you’ll want to miss. While we’ve talked in previous episodes about making photographs and crafting stories that are meaningful, we haven’t really looked hard at how to get that work seen by the world. (Don’t worry, in a future episode of Photo Forward, we’ll be talking with an expert on pricing and the financial side of creating your work.) But today we’re taking a brief detour from photographers to take a deep dive into the other side of visual storytelling: photo EDITING, with today’s guest Coburn Dukehart.

Coburn Dukehart is the Digital and Multimedia Director for the Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism where she directs its visual strategy, creates visual and audio content, manages digital assets and trains student and professional journalists. Our conversation centered around her decades of distinguished work at national news organizations as a photo editor for National Geographic, National Public Radio, and The Washington Post among others.

Coburn has received numerous multimedia awards from the National Press Photographers Association, POYI and the White House News Photographers Association. Her multimedia work also has been honored with a Webby, a Gracie, a Murrow and duPont awards, not to mention a nomination for a national Emmy.

In this episode, Coburn and I talk extensively about a number of visual storytelling topics like: what to do and what NOT to do when you’re making a story pitch to an editor, why building trust with the individuals in your photo stories is critical to making meaningful visual work, and how understanding the ethics of shooting and publishing photos (even captioning them!) can make a key impact on how visual media is viewed. You can find show notes with photos we talked about and links online at photoforward.media/podcast/Coburn . So, without further ado, our interview with Coburn Dukehart.

1 hr 2 min