12 episodes

Highlights and discussion from the 1st ITOC meeting in Munich, Germany.

1st Immunotherapy of Cancer Conference (ITOC 1) ecancer

    • Medicine

Highlights and discussion from the 1st ITOC meeting in Munich, Germany.

    • video
    Biomarker development for ipilimumab and prostate GVAX treatment

    Biomarker development for ipilimumab and prostate GVAX treatment

    Prof Tanja D. de Gruijl (VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) talks to ecancertv at the 1st Immunotherapy of Cancer Conference ( ITOC ) in Munich about personalising the use of immunotherapeutic approaches by using predictive biomarkers, to avoid unnecessary treatment.

    Immunotherapeutic approaches such as vaccination or immune checkpoint blockade have proven to be clinically active in prostate cancer, but only in certain patients.

    Prof de Gruijl's team has focused on the clinical efficacy in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer of the combination of an allogeneic cell line-based vaccine (Prostate GVAX) and an anti-CTLA4 checkpoint inhibitor (ipilimumab) in a Phase-I/II dose escalation/expansion trial.

    Based on their results they developed an an immune profile to predict clinical outcome. Importantly, cluster analysis revealed pre-treatment expression of CTLA-4 by circulating CD4 T cells and an immune-stimulatory myeloid profile to be dominant predictors for overall survival after Prostate GVAX/ ipilimumab therapy.

    These flowcytometry-based parameters may thus provide potentially useful and easy-to-use biomarkers for patient selection.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Toll like receptor 7 agonists for cancer immunotherapy

    Toll like receptor 7 agonists for cancer immunotherapy

    Prof Stefan Endres (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany) talks to ecancertv at the 1st Immunotherapy of Cancer Conference ( ITOC ) in Munich about toll like receptor 7 agonists for cancer immunotherapy.

    Toll like receptor 7 (TLR7) is from a class of proteins that play a key role in the innate immune system.

    One approach is to combine TLR7 RNA with a chemical from the triphosphate group, inducing interferon and alpha helping the immune system to fight tumour cells.

    Dr Endres covers the different approaches for activating the patient's own immune system to fight cancer.

    • 3 min
    • video
    The 1st Immunotherapy of Cancer Conference (ITOC)

    The 1st Immunotherapy of Cancer Conference (ITOC)

    Prof Heinz Zwierina (Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria), chair of ITOC 2014, talks to ecancertv about the meeting's key points and future.

    Immunotherapy for cancer has taken huge leaps forwards in the last couple of years, and progress is only accelerating, so ITOC is set to become an important fixture.

    • 1 min
    • video
    Molecular pathways associated with immune modulation and thalidomide analogues

    Molecular pathways associated with immune modulation and thalidomide analogues

    Dr Rajesh Chopra (Vice President of Translational and Early Drug Development, Celgene) at the 1st Immunotherapy of Cancer Conference ( ITOC ) in Munich about a newly discovered mechanism of action for immunomodulatory thalidomide analogues.

    These act by modulating the way certain proteins are degraded, thus preventing the growth of certain tumours such as lymphoma.

    This also negatively affects B-Cell development, but in turn activates T-Cells.

    The therapy could be combined with other antibodies and vaccines.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Adoptive cell therapy of melanoma with autologous tumour infiltrating lymphocytes

    Adoptive cell therapy of melanoma with autologous tumour infiltrating lymphocytes

    Prof Inge Marie Svane (Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, Denmark) talks to ecancertv at the 1st Immunotherapy of Cancer Conference ( ITOC ) in Munich about adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) with tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs).

    This is a personalised treatment for cancer whereby T-cells from a patient's tumour are taken out of the body, activated, multiplied, and put back in to tackle the tumour.

    This treatment has achieved impressive clinical results in several single institution phase I/II clinical trials performed outside Europe, and holds the promise to enter the mainstream of standard melanoma care in the near future.

    However, although transient, the toxicities associated with high-dose IL-2 classically administered together with TILs are severe and recent data have questioned its use.

    Despite its clinical efficacy, with impressive response rates and several long surviving completely responding patients, the implementation of TIL based ACT into current practice has been severely hampered by the technical complexity of cell production, the toxicity profile demanding treatment at specialized cancer centres, and lack of investment from the pharmaceutical industry.

    Dr Svane suggests that the next step should be a pivotal phase III trial in melanoma; required for regulatory approval. Further improvement of the therapy could also be pursued through combination treatment.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Maintenance therapy of metastatic colorectal carcinoma with the TLR-9 agonist MGN1703

    Maintenance therapy of metastatic colorectal carcinoma with the TLR-9 agonist MGN1703

    Prof Jorge Riera-Knorrenschild (University Clinic Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany) talks to ecancertv at the 1st Immunotherapy of Cancer Conference ( ITOC ) in Munich about maintenance therapy of metastatic colorectal carcinoma with the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9) agonist MGN1703, including the clinical and immunological predictive pretreatment factors of activity in the IMPACT trial.

    MGN1703 is a synthetic DNA-based immunomodulator acting as TLR-9 agonist which has shown preclinical activity in metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC) as well as a good safety profile in patients with metastatic solid tumours in a Phase 1 trial.

    The IMPACT trial was conducted to assess clinical efficacy, safety, and immunological effects of MGN1703 as maintenance therapy twice weekly s.c. vs. placebo.

    There was evidence of a superior effect of MGN1703 compared with placebo. The hazard ratio (HR) for the primary endpoint PFS on maintenance treatment group was 0.55, (p=0.040) on local assessment and 0.56 (p=0.070) by independent radiological review. Notably, at time of study closure 4 patients receiving MGN1703 were still free of progression and continued treatment in compassionate use protocols.

    After induction chemotherapy for mCRC, maintenance with MGN1703 is associated with improved PFS compared to placebo and low toxicity. The team found preliminary evidence that pretreatment CEA plasma levels, tumour response and activated NKT cells counts may allow identifying patients benefiting most from MGN1703 maintenance therapy.

    A confirmatory clinical study in patients with mCRC is planned to start in 2014.

    • 6 min

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