1 hr 10 min

20: A Court Supreme: Irin Carmon and Jay Wexler on Writing About SCOTUS and Justice in Fiction and Nonfiction fiction/non/fiction

    • News

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, New York Magazine senior correspondent Irin Carmon (co-author of Notorious RBG) and novelist and Boston University law professor Jay Wexler (author of Tuttle in the Balance) talk about news coverage and fictional depictions of the Supreme Court. How partisan is the Court becoming? Why use humor to write fiction about the nine Justices? Ruth Bader Ginsburg was Vladimir Nabokov’s student—what effect has this had on her writing, and how are she and other liberal justices contending with their Trump-appointed colleagues?Guests:●     Irin Carmon●     Jay Wexler Readings for the Episode:●     Irin Carmon’s archive at New York Magazine ●     “Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Clarence Thomas Are Officially at War Over Abortion,” The Cut, May 28, 2019, by Irin Carmon●     “The big cases: Here are the U.S. Supreme Court’s most consequential cases in its current term, which runs from Oct. 2018 to June 2019.” By Han Huang, Lawrence Hurley and Andrew Chung, Reuters Graphics●     Tuttle in the Balance, by Jay Wexler●     The Adventures of Ed Tuttle, Associate Justice, and Other Stories, by Jay Wexler●     Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburgby Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik●     Supreme Courtship by Christopher Buckley●     Our Non-Christian Nation: How Atheists, Satanists, Pagans, and Others Are Demanding Their Rightful Place in Public Lifeby Jay Wexler●     Ari Richter, artist●     “The Census Case Is Shaping Up to Be the Biggest Travesty Since Bush v. Gore,” by Richard L. Hasen, Slate, June 25, 2019Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, New York Magazine senior correspondent Irin Carmon (co-author of Notorious RBG) and novelist and Boston University law professor Jay Wexler (author of Tuttle in the Balance) talk about news coverage and fictional depictions of the Supreme Court. How partisan is the Court becoming? Why use humor to write fiction about the nine Justices? Ruth Bader Ginsburg was Vladimir Nabokov’s student—what effect has this had on her writing, and how are she and other liberal justices contending with their Trump-appointed colleagues?Guests:●     Irin Carmon●     Jay Wexler Readings for the Episode:●     Irin Carmon’s archive at New York Magazine ●     “Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Clarence Thomas Are Officially at War Over Abortion,” The Cut, May 28, 2019, by Irin Carmon●     “The big cases: Here are the U.S. Supreme Court’s most consequential cases in its current term, which runs from Oct. 2018 to June 2019.” By Han Huang, Lawrence Hurley and Andrew Chung, Reuters Graphics●     Tuttle in the Balance, by Jay Wexler●     The Adventures of Ed Tuttle, Associate Justice, and Other Stories, by Jay Wexler●     Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburgby Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik●     Supreme Courtship by Christopher Buckley●     Our Non-Christian Nation: How Atheists, Satanists, Pagans, and Others Are Demanding Their Rightful Place in Public Lifeby Jay Wexler●     Ari Richter, artist●     “The Census Case Is Shaping Up to Be the Biggest Travesty Since Bush v. Gore,” by Richard L. Hasen, Slate, June 25, 2019Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

1 hr 10 min

Top Podcasts In News