54 min

#20 - Stigma, Discrimination, Recovery, and Politics - with Ryan Hampton Stigma Podcast - Mental Health

    • Mental Health

In this episode Stephen Hays chats with Ryan Hampton about Ryan’s personal addiction journey that has led Ryan to the forefront of our national conversation on addiction and recovery.  Ryan shares his story and talks about where we are as a country on combatting addiction, fostering recovery, and defeating stigma.  Ryan really tells it how it is, and if you are at all concerned about how the government is dealing with (or not dealing with) drugs or addiction, you will feel better when you hear that Ryan is on our side (and when you hear what he’s doing).
Ryan is a former white house staffer (Clinton Administration) and is leading the national conversation about addiction and recovery.  He is the author of the book, American Fix – Inside the Opioid Addiction Crisis and How to End it.  He’s also part of a team that released the first-ever U.S. Surgeon Generals Report on Addiction (2016) and has been called a “top social entrepreneur” by Forbes.  He’s appeared on countless broadcasts on Fox News, CNN, NPR, HLN, and in the Wall Street Journal, The Hill, Vice, HuffPost and many other publications.  He is an authoritative figure on addiction and recovery in America.
Ryan has been instrumental in getting addiction legislation drafted, and passed both in California, and at the Federal level including HR 4684, also known as “Tyler’s Law” or the “Ensuring Access to Quality Sober Living Act of 2018.”
You can connect with Ryan Hampton and learn more about his work here: Ryan Hampton’s Website, Book: American Fix, Ryan’s Twitter,

SOME OF THE THINGS WE TALKED ABOUT:
Ryan tells his story of addiction, and recovery.   Just after Thanksgiving of 2014 Ryan was in drug treatment.  It was a place he never thought he would end up.  Certainly not after being stranded and homeless on the streets of Los Angeles.  Ryan had a very promising future career in politics, he worked in the Clinton White House, then worked for the Democratic National Committee through 2003.  After a hiking accident in 2003, he was prescribed an opioid based pain killer which ultimately led him to addiction to not only pain killers bur heroin and other addictions.

Addiction journey:  From 2003 to 2014, Ryan spent years living in addiction to opioids and later heroin.  After multiple attempts at treatment, rehab, sober living, and struggling with uncertainty about what to do, he found himself homeless in Los Angeles at Thanksgiving of 2014.  Ryan spent Thanksgiving Day of 2014 on the corner of Hollywood Blvd and Highland with no food, no place to sleep, and no insurance, begging for help.  That week someone helped him and got him to a treatment center.
After treatment, he moved into a sober house, and plugged into a peer community that lifted him up when he couldn’t lift himself up.  He focused on his recovery, went to meetings every day, drove Uber, and worked odd jobs.  He was still incredibly ashamed though.  He didn’t want to talk about addiction and recovery outside of the recovery community. 
What made you start speaking out, taking action, and coming out of the shadows?  13 months into recovery, while still living in a sober living home, Ryan experienced the death of several of his friends in the recovery community.  These were people he lived with or went to treatment with.  These were people who got sober, but then relapsed, and could not get care, some of which went to hospitals and were denied care or left out on the street and died as a result.
Ryan soon started to look outside of his local recovery community to see why people were dying and why nobody cared.  This is when he started to get more involved and connect with the recovery community and recovery movement nationally.   Leveraging his former political activist roots, he started using the cause of addiction to organize people and get people registered to vote, call their congress person, etc.
Comparing the AIDS crisis to the addic

In this episode Stephen Hays chats with Ryan Hampton about Ryan’s personal addiction journey that has led Ryan to the forefront of our national conversation on addiction and recovery.  Ryan shares his story and talks about where we are as a country on combatting addiction, fostering recovery, and defeating stigma.  Ryan really tells it how it is, and if you are at all concerned about how the government is dealing with (or not dealing with) drugs or addiction, you will feel better when you hear that Ryan is on our side (and when you hear what he’s doing).
Ryan is a former white house staffer (Clinton Administration) and is leading the national conversation about addiction and recovery.  He is the author of the book, American Fix – Inside the Opioid Addiction Crisis and How to End it.  He’s also part of a team that released the first-ever U.S. Surgeon Generals Report on Addiction (2016) and has been called a “top social entrepreneur” by Forbes.  He’s appeared on countless broadcasts on Fox News, CNN, NPR, HLN, and in the Wall Street Journal, The Hill, Vice, HuffPost and many other publications.  He is an authoritative figure on addiction and recovery in America.
Ryan has been instrumental in getting addiction legislation drafted, and passed both in California, and at the Federal level including HR 4684, also known as “Tyler’s Law” or the “Ensuring Access to Quality Sober Living Act of 2018.”
You can connect with Ryan Hampton and learn more about his work here: Ryan Hampton’s Website, Book: American Fix, Ryan’s Twitter,

SOME OF THE THINGS WE TALKED ABOUT:
Ryan tells his story of addiction, and recovery.   Just after Thanksgiving of 2014 Ryan was in drug treatment.  It was a place he never thought he would end up.  Certainly not after being stranded and homeless on the streets of Los Angeles.  Ryan had a very promising future career in politics, he worked in the Clinton White House, then worked for the Democratic National Committee through 2003.  After a hiking accident in 2003, he was prescribed an opioid based pain killer which ultimately led him to addiction to not only pain killers bur heroin and other addictions.

Addiction journey:  From 2003 to 2014, Ryan spent years living in addiction to opioids and later heroin.  After multiple attempts at treatment, rehab, sober living, and struggling with uncertainty about what to do, he found himself homeless in Los Angeles at Thanksgiving of 2014.  Ryan spent Thanksgiving Day of 2014 on the corner of Hollywood Blvd and Highland with no food, no place to sleep, and no insurance, begging for help.  That week someone helped him and got him to a treatment center.
After treatment, he moved into a sober house, and plugged into a peer community that lifted him up when he couldn’t lift himself up.  He focused on his recovery, went to meetings every day, drove Uber, and worked odd jobs.  He was still incredibly ashamed though.  He didn’t want to talk about addiction and recovery outside of the recovery community. 
What made you start speaking out, taking action, and coming out of the shadows?  13 months into recovery, while still living in a sober living home, Ryan experienced the death of several of his friends in the recovery community.  These were people he lived with or went to treatment with.  These were people who got sober, but then relapsed, and could not get care, some of which went to hospitals and were denied care or left out on the street and died as a result.
Ryan soon started to look outside of his local recovery community to see why people were dying and why nobody cared.  This is when he started to get more involved and connect with the recovery community and recovery movement nationally.   Leveraging his former political activist roots, he started using the cause of addiction to organize people and get people registered to vote, call their congress person, etc.
Comparing the AIDS crisis to the addic

54 min